Charity Nebbe

Talk of Iowa Host

Charity Nebbe grew up in rural Iowa just outside of Cedar Falls.  She began her career in public radio at WOI Radio in Ames, Iowa when she was a student at Iowa State University and has been working in public radio ever since.  Early in her career she created Chinwag Theater a nationally syndicated public radio show that she produced and co-hosted with well known author Daniel Pinkwater.  She spent ten years at Michigan Radio in Ann Arbor and in 2010 returned to Iowa. 

Charity is now the host of Iowa Public Radio’s Talk of Iowa, heard weekday mornings at 10.  She is also the host of Iowa Ingredient on Iowa Public Television and the author of the children's book “Our Walk in the Woods,” published in 2008. Charity is the chair of the advisory board for Let Me Run Eastern Iowa Corridor, a character development and running program for boys. 

Aaron Burden / Unsplash

For those who identify as spiritual or religious, faith may offer comfort and support in a time of overwhelming uncertainty. But with houses of worship shuttered and group meetings restricted, faith groups are being forced to get creative and focus on remote accessibility. 

Lester Graham

While schools are closed, we're creating a series of "Talk of Iowa" episodes that will be fun and educational for learners of all ages. Every Tuesday, we'll learn about Iowa wildlife, and every Thursday, we'll learn about Iowa history.  

Annie Spratt / Unsplash

 

Educators, parents and students are all struggling to find their way through distance learning, but the challenges can be even greater for special education students.

Krzysztof Niewolny / Unsplash

They’re slimy, gray, hungry and love to eat holes in the leaves of your hostas.

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe speaks with Entomologist Donald Lewis, Horticulturist Richard Jauron and Forester Mark Vitosh about slugs and their fellow gastropods – snails. Listeners also get their questions answered about plants and trees.

Guests:

Courtesy of Library of Congress

While schools are closed, we're creating a series of "Talk of Iowa" episodes that will be fun and educational for learners of all ages. Every Tuesday, we'll learn about Iowa wildlife, and every Thursday, we'll learn about Iowa history.

Jeannine St-Amour / Flickr

While schools are closed, we're creating a series of "Talk of Iowa" episodes that will be fun and educational for learners of all ages. Every Tuesday, we'll learn about Iowa wildlife, and every Thursday, we'll learn about Iowa history.  

Annie Spratt / Unsplash

Schools are scrambling to figure out how to teach their students from afar.

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe and her guests talk about education in the age of COVID-19. Nebbe speaks with Linn-Mar high school teacher Steve Meeker about his experiences with online teaching. Mark McDermott of the University of Iowa has some advice for parents trying to find enrichment activities for their children and retired elementary school counselor Jane Balvanz provides understanding for the the social and emotional needs of students.

National Park Service

April is upon us, and Iowa is beginning to bloom. On this horticulture day edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe is joined by Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist Richard Jauron and Deb Lewis, curator of the Ada Hayden Herbarium at Iowa State University for an exploration of spring blooms.

Associated Press

While schools are closed, we're creating a series of "Talk of Iowa" episodes that will be fun and educational for learners of all ages. Every Tuesday, we'll learn about Iowa wildlife, and every Thursday, we'll learn about Iowa history.  

TL/Unsplash

"A Sand County Almanac" was first published in 1949, but Aldo Leopold’s contemplative musings on conservation and land stewardship remain poignantly relevant.

Iowa DNR

While schools are closed, we're creating a series of  "Talk of Iowa" episodes that will be fun and educational for learners of all ages. Every Tuesday, we'll learn about Iowa wildlife, and every Thursday, we'll learn about Iowa history.  

Claudia McGehee Illustration

This program originally aired on June 21, 2018.  

Discussions about endangered species in Iowa often focus on the bigger, showier species that make headlines, like the bald eagle; but there are many species at risk that fly under the radar.

For instance, the Topeka Shiner, a small minnow that lives in Midwestern streams.

Ochir-Erdene Oyunmedeg / Unsplash

The grass is starting to turn green… but is your lawn following suit?

Photo courtesy of the Iowa Department of Transportation Historic Archives

While schools are closed, we're creating a series of "Talk of Iowa" episodes that will be fun and educational for learners of all ages. Every Tuesday, we'll learn about Iowa wildlife, and every Thursday, we'll learn about Iowa history.  

Our series continues with a look at the history of the good roads movement and the Lincoln Highway in Iowa. The guides for this hour of history will be Tom Morain of Graceland University and former director of the State Historical Society of Iowa and Drake Hokanson, author of The Lincoln Highway: Main Street Across America.

Courtesy of Lisa Fender

Most of us are spending a lot more time at home these days. Many people have been motivated to dig into a thorough spring cleaning and still others find the familiarity of home is breeding contempt. Or, at least discontent with some past decorating choices. 

Courtesy of Siobhan Spain

As the coronavirus spreads every one of us will know someone who is infected, if we don’t already. But right now it can still be difficult to wrap our minds around what is going on and many people are, understandably, reluctant to share that they are infected with COVID-19. On this segment of Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe speaks with Siobhan Spain, director of Mainframe Studios in Des Moines to share her story. She and her husband have both tested positive for COVID-19.

Carl Kurtz

 

While schools are closed, we're creating a series of  "Talk of Iowa" episodes that will be fun and educational for learners of all ages. Every Tuesday, we'll learn about Iowa wildlife, and every Thursday, we'll learn about Iowa history.  

CoWomen / Unsplash

During this dark and scary time there are some points of light. We’ve seen neighborhoods come together virtually. People have been decorating in themes for families to enjoy when they go out for walks, coordinating support for elderly neighbors, organizing socially distant birthday surprises for people who are stuck at home, and swapping home schooling or entertainment ideas.

Markus Spiske / Unsplash

The new crisis the world is facing is reviving an old idea: The Victory Garden.

Victory gardens first emerged during World War I, and in World War II Americans were once again urged to plant gardens to provide food for their families and neighbors.

Matthew Henry / Unsplash

Guest host Charity Nebbe speaks with several mental health experts about how to navigate mental health in times of crisis. They offer tips and share information about mental health resources that are available in Iowa.

Hannon Family

While schools are closed, we're creating a series of "Talk of Iowa" episodes that will be fun and educational for learners of all ages. Every Tuesday, we'll learn about Iowa wildlife, and every Thursday, we'll learn about Iowa history.  

Our series continues with a difficult time in Iowa history. With COVID-19 spreading world-wide, you’ve probably heard people talking about the flu pandemic of 1918 – also referred to as the Spanish Flu. 

Iowa PBS

Dean Borg passed away this week at the age of 81. Borg was a broadcasting legend in the state of Iowa. He is best known for his work on the Iowa PBS program Iowa Press, a position he held for more than 40 years. During that period he interviewed every president from John F. Kennedy to Barack Obama. Borg also spent 20 years as a correspondent with Iowa Public Radio.

Craig Meyers

While schools are closed, we're creating a series of  "Talk of Iowa" episodes that will be fun and educational for learners of all ages. Every Tuesday, we'll learn about Iowa wildlife, and every Thursday, we'll learn about Iowa history.  

Claudio Schwarz / Unsplash

With classes canceled or moving online, college students are moving back home. They’ll be joined by their parents, siblings and anyone one else who is working from home as the country practices social distancing to stop the spread of COVID-19.

Sharon McCutcheon / Unsplash

Iowa Public Radio listeners love to learn. While schools are closed, we're creating a series of  "Talk of Iowa" episodes that will be fun and educational for learners of all ages.

Emily Woodbury / IPR

It's a very simple idea. A boy, a dog and a short story.

Migrate this simple idea to Twitter, and it becomes a phenomenon. As of this writing, @IvePetThatDog has more than 90-thousand followers. Gideon Kidd is the star of "I've Pet That Dog." He's a normal nine-year-old boy from Cedar Falls, who is anything but typical.

Constancia Huff Roling

*This program originally aired on June 14, 2018

An extended voyage down the Mississippi River in a kayak hasn't always been high on Barb Geiger's list of things she wanted to do. But one Sunday morning in 2013, after weeks of preparation, Barb and her husband set off in a self-built kayak for an epic five month journey of paddling and service work. 

Mikhail Vasilyev / Unsplash

On this 'Horticulture Day' edition of Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe speaks with Donald Lewis and Richard Jauron of Iowa State University extension and Mark Vitosh of the Iowa DNR to answer listener questions about the bugs, plants, trees and prairies in their lives.

Matt Alvarez / IPR

Dr. Francois Abboud describes his coming to the United States as serendipitous.

In 1955, as a young up and coming doctor in Egypt, he had little knowledge of the United States' medical offerings. But after a family friend filled out an application for a fellowship at the University of Milwaukee, without his knowledge, he received an acceptance letter. He soon got married and within a few short months was on his way to America. This was the beginning of a medical career that has spanned more than six decades in the midwest

Courtesy of Rachel Cox

Rachel Cox’s grandmother was a woman with a big personality and a keen sense of fashion. When Cox, a photographer and assistant professor of photography at the University of Iowa, first started taking pictures of her grandmother, she didn’t have any particular projects in mind. But as her grandmother declined over the course of a decade, suffering from a degenerative brain disease, she felt compelled to photograph her life and death. The result is the book Shiny Ghost.

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