Lindsey Moon

Talk Show Producer

Lindsey Moon started as a talk show producer with Iowa Public Radio in May of 2014. She comes to IPR by way of Illinois Public Media, an NPR/PBS dual licensee in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, and Wisconsin Public Radio where she’s worked as a producer and a general assignment reporter.

Lindsey is an Iowa native and a 2012 graduate of the University of Iowa with degrees in Anthropology and Journalism. Her work has earned awards from the Wisconsin Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated and the Northwest Broadcast News Association and has aired on NPR’s All Things Considered.

In her free time, she’s a bookworm, and enjoys running half marathons, seeing live music and scuba diving whenever there’s time and money to plan a trip. Lindsey’s favorite public radio programs are Wait, Wait… Don’t Tell Me! and Talk of Iowa

At a recent Iowa high school basketball game, the visiting team had to endure racist chants by rival students in the stands. During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with a school superintendent about how the immigration debate is impacting one of Iowa's most diverse communities. 

Karsten Moran / Redux Pictures

New York Times Magazine Staff Writer Nikole Hannah-Jones is no stranger to hard conversations about race. She grew up in Waterloo, Iowa, being bused to a school across town that was mostly white, compared to her majority black neighborhood. She says she grew up spending about two hours on the bus each day. 

Gisela Giardino/Flickr

"Wine is to women as duck tape is to men: it fixes everything. " "I make wine disappear, what's your super power?" "I'm dreaming of a white Christmas, but if the white runs out, I'll drink red."

These are supposed to be jokes, but they may also be indicative of a growing problem. During this hour on Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks with Ann Dowsett-Johnson, author of "Drink: The Intimate Relationship Between Women and Alcohol," about women's relationship with drinking culture. 

Martin Falbisoner/Wikimedia Commons

The government shutdown lasted three days. What did it accomplish, and what will be the way forward on immigration? 

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Wayne Moyer, Rosenfield professor of political science at Grinnell College and Rachel Caufield, associate professor of political science at Drake University about the shutdown, the Russia investigation, Trump's visit to Davos, and Vice President Mike Pence's trip the Middle East. 

State Capitol Ceiling
John Pemble / IPR

Iowa legislators have said that addressing the state's water quality is a priority.  During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Mary Skopec, who is executive director of Iowa's Lakeside Laboratory. She says that the problem with nutrient run-off from the state's 29 million acres of agricultural land is not the only issue to be addressed—it is a part of the problem. 

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Watching the local evening news on television was once routine in nearly every household. Increasingly, that is no longer the case according to a study by the Pew Research Center. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with KCRG-TV's News Director Adam Carros about how his newsroom is handling a decline in viewership. 

He says many networks are working to cut deals with streaming services like Apple TV, Roku, Hulu and Netflix. 

Clayton Treloar/Flickr

It starts as a minor inconvenience with no water coming out of the tap, but frozen pipes can quickly turn into a major crisis. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, home improvement expert Bill McAnally joins host Charity Nebbe to talk about caring for and inspecting your pipes. 

Daniel R. Blume / http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

Obituaries are not what they used to be. They have gone through many changes since they first started appearing in newspapers, but in recent years they have been radical and rapid. 

Iowa writer Mary Kay Shanley has been studying obituaries and how they've changed; she also teaches people how to write them. During this Talk of Iowa conversation, she talks with host Charity Nebbe. 

Shanley is also the author of Our State Fair: Iowa's Blue Ribbon Story, The Memory Box, and She Taught Me to Eat Artichokes. 

Photo Courtesy of Justin Roberts

There is a lot of children's music out there, and some of it is really bad. But over the course of the last two decades, children's music as a genre has become a home for many smart, funny, and talented musicians. Iowa native Justin Roberts is one of them. 

During this hour of Talk of Iowa, he talks with host Charity Nebbe about his newest album Lemonade, which has been nominated for a Grammy this year. It's his third time being nominated. 

On this album, he has several laugh out loud funny songs, including one called "Valentine."  

African American Museum of Iowa

The African American Museum of Iowa will offer free admission from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. CST on Monday, January 15 in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. 

During this Talk of Iowa interview, host Charity Nebbe talks with LaNisha Cassell, the museum's executive director, and Felicite Wolfe, the museum's curator. 

Michelle Hoover

This program originally aired on April 20, 2016.

In her new novel "Bottomland," (Grove Press), Ames native Michelle Hoover writes about a family's struggles after the disappearance of two of their daughters.  She tells host Charity Nebbe that the story was inspired by a long forgotten photograph of her own family.

In her book "White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide," professor Carol Anderson writes about what she says is a trend as old as the nation itself: "white rage."

The book takes readers back to Reconstruction, which was when Americans were rebuilding after the Civil War.  Instead of creating an inclusive and vibrant democracy, she argues the country chose to go a different route. In her book, she talks about the terrorism waged by the Ku Klux Klan but also talks about the subtler and systematic way in which policy makers discriminated against African-Americans.

Iowa capitol
John Pemble / Iowa Public Radio

Lawmakers gavel in for the 2018 legislative session Monday, January 8 in Des Moines at the statehouse. After several controversial bills made it through in 2017, Republicans remain in control of both chambers and the governor's office. What are their plans for the 2018 session?

Iowans should keep an eye on the statehouse with regard to tax reform, according to Radio Iowa's News Director Kay Henderson. 

Till Westermayer / Flickr, Creative Commons

A lot of people in 2017 have heard that "it's hard to listen to the news." Between natural disasters, political developments, and acts of violence, it's been an eventful year. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks about good news, acts of kindness, and thankfulness. 

Courtesy of Bob Dorr

Rock and roll babies, here's your best of list for 2017, according to Bob Dorr! He talked about his favorite releases and re-releases of the year with Talk of Iowa host Charity Nebbe. 

Elvin Bishop - Big Fun Trio

Elvin Bishop's Big Fun Trio combines Elvin's signature good humor song writing and guitar playing with Bob Welsh, the keys player in Elvin's regular band and Willy Jordan on Cajon, a South American percussion instrument. That disc came out in early 2017, I expect it to win some major awards.

Tony Dehner / Iowa Public Radio

Lots of new music was released in 2017; here at Iowa Public Radio, we received more than 2,000 albums. If wading through all of that sounds overwhelming, never fear. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Tony Dehner and Mark Simmet of Iowa Public Radio's Studio One about their favorite albums of the year. 

We've also had our most musically-minded staff curate their top five favorite albums of this year, including Morning Edition host Clay Masters. Check out our Spotify playlist and read album reviews below. 

John Pemble / Iowa Public Radio

Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medical treatment that's been around for thousands of years.  It has become more mainstream over the course of the last twenty years, and in this hour on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Deb van Latenstein who is a licensed acupuncturist at the Acupuncture Wellness Center and Allergy Clinic of Iowa in Des Moines. She says acupuncture isn't magic, and it's easiest to understand if you think about the body about a piece of meat. 

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The president and CEO of the conservative advocacy group The Family Leader says Americans have a right to know if President Trump engaged in past sexual misconduct. Bob Vander Plaats says the allegations made by a number of women against the president should not be ignored simply because he says he’s innocent.

"A lot of these ladies came forth in the election, and for whatever reason, the American people said 'we're going to give the presidency to Donald Trump.' That doesn't mean their issue went away because he became president." 

Open Minded in Alabama / Flickr

Today, Democrats are celebrating Doug Jones' victory in Alabama, and Republicans are picking through the wreckage. During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Steffen Schmidt, professor of political science at Iowa State University and Rachel Caufield, associate professor of political science at Drake University.  They discuss how voters are feeling about sexual assault and harassment by men in leadership positions. 

Charity Nebbe / Iowa Public Radio

UI Writer's Workshop graduate Reza Aslan has been writing and talking about God for most of his career. His newest book God: A Human History follows his last title Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth.

"If we can learn to stop hoisting our own emotions upon God, I think we can pave the path for a much more peaceful religiosity," he says. 

City of Cedar Rapids

During the 1930s, there was a mural commissioned by a depression-era arts program in what was then a district courthouse. Today, that mural has been restored and is now on display in Cedar Rapids' city hall. During a recent city council election, that mural became the center of a conversation about what kinds of art are appropriate to display. 

Photo Courtesy of NASA

On September 3, Iowan Peggy Whitson returned from her most recent mission to the International Space Station. She has spent a total of 665 days in space during three separate missions. That's more than any other woman worldwide and more than any other American. 

Whitson grew up in Beaconsfield where her parents farm, and she says she's still proud to be an Iowan. During this River to River conversation, she talks with host Ben Kieffer. 

During this hour of River to River, it's a special Pints and Politics edition of the program, recorded before a live audience at CSPS in Cedar Rapids on Thursday, November 30. 

The medical and mental health communities are doing their best to learn about and treat post traumatic stress disorder more effectively. Historically, the term "shell shocked" immediately comes to mind, and a new play by Combined Efforts Theatre in Iowa City raises some questions about the kinds of trauma that soldiers who fought in World War I experienced when the term was first introduced. 

There are 2.2 billion Christians in the world, and there's a whole lot of diversity under the umbrella of that religion. Pastor Lillian Daniel, who lives in Dubuque and is senior pastor at First Congregational Church, is frustrated by the stereotypes that have developed about Christians and other people who attend church. 

Ken Lund / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

President Trump is rapidly reshaping the judiciary. On this River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with guests about how Republicans are systematically filling vacancies in the federal court system with young, conservative judges.

Joining the conversation is former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Iowa Kevin Techau and Todd Pettys of the University of Iowa College of Law. 

Food Bank of Iowa

Around the holidays, there are a lot of organizations hosting food drives, collecting canned and non-perishable foods to send to food banks and pantries across the state. That's a worthy effort, and those donations are appreciated by food banks. But food banks want people to also consider that they have more purchasing power for a dollar than you do. 

During this segment of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Michelle Book, who is CEO of the Food Bank of Iowa. Book says her organization distributes one million pounds of food a month to more than 75,000 Iowans. 

benjamin sTone/flickr

The Tuesday after Thanksgiving has been dubbed #GivingTuesday, and in light of that fairly recent development, many end-of-year fundraising campaigns are getting a boost. This hour on Talk of Iowa, we hear from a few community foundations in Iowa about the work they are doing. 

"Community foundations serve a specific geographic area. In the state of Iowa, we have at least one, and sometimes more than one in each of our ninety-nine counties," explains Kari McCann Boutell, who is president of the Iowa Council of Foundations. 

Didriks / Flickr

For many, listening to StoryCorps on Friday mornings has become routine—a few minutes to listen, learn, reflect, and often shed a few tears.

When StoryCorps debuted in 2003, it sounded unlike anything else on public radio.  They were stories not driven by news or cultural events, and they were stories that didn’t feature news-makers. These were stories of normal people sharing their memories. We quickly learned that those normal people were extraordinary, and that we all have stories to share.

robertsharp

We go through life surrounded by other people, but for many people, the isolation of the modern world takes a serious toll on health and happiness. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy about what he sees as an epidemic of loneliness in the U.S. 

"If you're not lonely, and you're listening to this radio segment, there are people around you who are," he says.

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