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St. Ansgar man is the first Iowan to plead guilty for involvement in Capitol insurrection

In this photo from an FBI criminal complaint, investigators identified Daryl Johnson (circled in red) and his son Daniel in the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021.
FBI criminal affidavit
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In this photo from an FBI criminal complaint, investigators identified Daryl Johnson (circled in red) and his son Daniel in the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.

Nearly one year after hundreds of rioters broke into the U.S. Capitol and interrupted the certification of the 2020 presidential election, one of the six Iowans charged with federal crimes for taking part in the attack has pleaded guilty.

Daryl Johnson of St. Ansgar and his son Daniel Johnson from Austin, Minnesota were initially charged with five counts each for joining the insurrection on Jan. 6. Both ended up pleading guilty Tuesday to one count of civil disorder.

Federal prosecutor Laura Hill said in a D.C. District Court hearing held remotely over video that the Johnsons climbed into the building through a broken window and were in the Capitol for 26 minutes.

She said video shows the men joining others to break through Capitol Police in the Rotunda so that more people could force their way into the building.

“Along with a group of other rioters, the Johnsons rushed the line of officers helping to push through the officers and open those east Rotunda doors. This allowed rioters outside of the building to enter the Capitol,” Hill said.

The FBI was first tipped off to their identities after Daniel posted about it on Snapchat.

Investigators also found Facebook posts and comments in which Daniel and Daryl boasted about being part of the mob in the Capitol.

A sentencing hearing was set for April 12. Both men are free on bond until then. An estimate made as part of the plea agreement suggests they could receive up to six months in prison, but the charge allows up to five years and a fine between $2,000-$20,000.