© 2022 Iowa Public Radio
IPR20012_Website_Header_Option2_NewsNavy.png
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
IPR News
Iowa's meat processing workforce is incredibly diverse. COVID-19 outbreaks at the plants last year exposed many vulnerabilities in this group.

It didn't kill them, it made them stronger. An Iowa meatpacking family's battle with COVID

12162021-Meatpacking-Family
Kassidy Arena
/
IPR
(From left to right) Isabel Djaroun, her daughter Nadia, Alejandro Murguia-Ortiz and Micaela and Martín pose for a family photo in their home in Sioux City. Both Ortiz parents were working in meat packing plants when COVID-19 became widespread.
English
Español
English

Isabel Djaroun stood with her mother in the living room in her home in Sioux City. Isabel’s one-month-old daughter Nadia sat in her purple and white baby swing nearby. The two older women leaned over a giant silver-plated pot that’s usually reserved for pozole, a kind of Mexican stew.

Isabel and Micaela Ortiz held a brown blanket over their heads. It was Isabel’s first marital comforter, and it was the largest piece of fabric they owned. It worked perfectly to make a sauna over the large pot. And instead of stew, the giant pot held an old family recipe of spices and herbs to help clear out their lungs. Occasionally Isabel would stir the steaming hot concoction with a wooden spoon. That spoon still gives her flashback to this day.

The three generations of women had been exposed to COVID-19. And the makeshift sauna provided some relief, just enough to be able to breathe easier.

Isabel believes her husband Massi initially brought home the virus from a meatpacking facility in Dakota City, Nebraska, where he works as a translator. She said it also could also have been her brother-in-law, who was also putting in long hours at the same plant. Or, come to think of it, it could have been her mother who worked at a different meatpacking plant in Sioux City.

What Isabel knows for sure is that all the adults in her home tested positive. She had been home on maternity leave when one day, Massi walked in the door complaining of a few symptoms. He could no longer smell the aromas of Mexican cooking from the kitchen. Oddly, he couldn’t taste the spicy chili Isabel had packed him for lunch that day.

Isabel knew that was a symptom of the virus that had already killed a number of her friends, clients and their loved ones. And she did the only thing she could do. She took a COVID test that week.

And waited for two days.

When her phone rang, it was the urgent care with news of her positive results for COVID-19.

It felt like a tidal wave had hit the family.

Isabel quarantined herself in her room. Her mother took care of baby Nadia. Her father Martín was in the hospital with pneumonia. And she couldn’t do anything.

Isabel wrung her hands, alone in her room, while her newborn cried just on the other side of the wall. The closed door silently mocked her. It was so easy to open, but if she did, she risked putting her daughter at risk.

All the worrying was taking a toll. She felt her throat was closing. Even as her family called the hospital to let them know a COVID-infected person was on the way, images of Nadia growing up without a mother flooded Isabel’s mind.

Isabel learned at the hospital that she had suffered from a severe anxiety attack. She thanked God it wasn’t caused by COVID-19.

12162021-Holding-Baby-With-Gloves
Isabel Djaroun
/
Massi Djaroun had to hold his newborn daughter Nadia with loads of personal protection equipment on. He works in a meatpacking facility as a translator and ended up testing positive for COVID-19.

Even recalling the memories, tears fell down Isabel’s cheeks and on to her long brown hair. She still struggles with anxiety— for her, that’s one of the underlying, long-term conditions of surviving COVID-19.

While COVID made its way from Isabel’s husband, to herself, to Micaela, the family relied on the other three siblings to run errands, bring them medicine and distract them from the fact that they had a disease that had killed thousands in the state, and in their community. Many of its victims had been immigrants and meat processing plant workers.

Meat packing plants in Iowa saw some of the worst mass outbreaks of COVID-19 in the state. The federal government declared meat packing plants among essential facilities that needed to stay open. Iowa started gaining national attention when plants started shutting down after too many of their employees were infected. Meatpacking facilities in the state were among those included in a federal investigation into coronavirus outbreaks in such facilities.

Hundreds of meatpacking workers have died from the disease and tens of thousands have tested positive, according to the Food & Environment Reporting Network. Most of the cases are heavily concentrated across Iowa and into Nebraska and South Dakota. Most of the positive cases and deaths among meatpacking workers in Iowa was at Tyson Foods. That’s where Martín worked. (He has since stopped working and is on long-term disability leave.)

Micaela works at the Smithfield plant in Sioux City. Several of the company’s other plants shut down temporarily amid COVID-19 hotspot designations. Smithfield also faced an OSHA violations and earlier this year, reached a settlement with the federal government to change a number of health procedures relating to infectious diseases.

12162021-Smithfield-Foods-Outbreak
Stephen Groves
/
AP file
In this 2020 file photo, residents cheer and hold thank you signs to greet employees of a Smithfield pork processing plant as they begin their shift in Sioux Falls, S.D.

The family relied heavily on the youngest Ortiz, Alejandro.

At 25 years old, Alejandro Murguia-Ortiz felt like he was balancing the world on his shoulders. Knowing that he was his family’s “only option,” Alejandro drove the almost three hours from Des Moines to Sioux City to care for his dad while everyone else was quarantined with COVID in Isabel’s home. He remembers waving to his mom from the front window of the little blue home. Her from the inside and him from the outside with a sheet of glass as their protection.

One night, Alejandro admits he cried. He wiped away tears induced by stress and worry for his family. His mother didn’t go to the doctor because she felt the health system is too complicated for people who aren’t U.S. citizens. She is still studying for her U.S. citizenship exam.

He said the simple thought of ordering food seemed like too much, with the bills increasing due to hospital care for Martín.

12162021-Alejandro-Walking
Kassidy Arena
/
IPR
Alejandro works as a community organizer for Iowa Migrant Movement for Justice, a nonprofit agency that advocates for immigrants and other underrepresented people in the state. Alejandro didn't realize community organizing was a job until the organization reached out to him about the opening, after seeing his work in the community.

And his family was just one of the cases Alejandro had taken on. He had just taken on a new job as a community organizer for a nonprofit that helps immigrants and other underserved communities in Iowa. So when he cried, the tears weren’t just for his family, but also for the families dealing with immigration agents, the families whose loved ones died, the families struggling financially.

Alejandro’s shoulders fall as he remembers the utter exhaustion that took over him.

12162021-ICE-Rally
Kassidy Arena
/
IPR
Alejandro Murguia-Ortiz leads a rally against unfair treatment from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in downtown Des Moines the summer of 2020.

Martín knew it wasn’t easy for his youngest son, but Alejandro taking on more responsibilities didn’t surprise him.

Growing up in Jalisco, in Mexico, it was always work, work, work.

After a short hesitation, Martín adds “and school.”

Life wasn’t much different for Micaela, who is also from the west coast Mexican state of Jalisco. Although she didn’t go to school after fourth grade, Micaela remembers a childhood that was beautiful. She and her siblings didn’t always get what they wanted, but she got what she needed.

And they both remember Alejandro as not the one to give up easily, even as a child. One time, Micaela remembers, Alejandro was riding his bike. He loved playing outdoors. But, he and his siblings weren’t supposed to get too far from the house. This time, he rode his bike too far away.

He fell and hurt his knee. He cried for a bit, but then he got up. And, he never stopped riding his bike.

Another time, Micaela said, he was jumping on the trampoline and fell off. He broke his hand. He still loves jumping on the trampoline today.

As time passed and his family healed physically from the virus, Alejandro began focusing on vaccine outreach and making sure his community members had access to COVID information, in a language they understand. Most times, he said the state was severely lacking.

For the first few months of COVID-19, Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds didn’t have Spanish interpreters for her weekly press conferences. When the vaccine was introduced, meatpacking workers weren’t considered in “tier one” in the rollout. And in almost all counties, some workers were excluded from pandemic relief funding due to their immigration status. (Johnson County recently agreed to using some of their American Rescue Plan Act funds for these excluded workers.)

12162021-Micaela-And-Nadia
Isabel Djaroun
/
Micaela Ortiz poses for a photo with her first granddaughter Nadia (Isabel's daughter). Nadia loves snacks and saying hello during interviews. Isabel and Massi are raising Nadia to be trilingual.

When vaccines were available to workers, meat packing plants organized vaccination clinics. But some people didn’t sign up. Tyson Foods ended up returning vaccines to local health departments. The Tyson Foods Perry plant in Dallas County returned enough to double the county’s vaccinations one week, a spokesperson for the county health department said.

“I think much of that is just because of the trust that has been lost in trying to get adequate information,” Alejandro said. “I think people are seeing, you know, our structures or systems for what they truly are. And that they are oppressive and that they exist to be that way in many cases.”

Micaela, his mom, hesitated when talking about her bout of COVID-19. Eventually, she said “Well, I didn’t get too bad…” She didn’t lose her smell or her taste. It was the isolation that she remembers as being the worst part. Despite being hospitalized, Martín felt the same way.

But Isabel remembers it differently. As her parents spoke, her eyes widened and she gripped the armrest of her La-Z-Boy chair. She shook her head almost imperceptibly. The soft yellow light of the room glinted off her glasses.

That just shows from, you know, them being immigrants to this country is, they have to be okay with what they have. You know? And I think that’s why they don’t feel like they need to speak up.
Isabel Djaroun

“I was kind of getting really annoyed when my parents were getting interviewed, especially with my dad,” she admitted. “They both were treating it like, ‘oh, it was not hard, no big deal.’ But it was hard! Super super hard.”

They can all agree though, Alejandro, Isabel, their siblings and parents, that somehow, they came out the other side stronger. They visit each other more often. They laugh together more often.

Alejandro chuckles as he remembers the video conference calls between family members during the separation. They used Facebook Messenger, which allows users to digitally change their faces. So when they talked about how bad COVID was getting and how they would keep hospital bills low, it was a conversation among a concerned crocodile, rainbow-cheeked fashion mogul and shiny-auraed unicorn.

Alejandro and Isabel see their parents in a new light. They’re not invincible. But that’s what makes them human.

They realized they can take their fate in their own hands and take care of one another across the three generations of their family.

A few weeks ago, Alejandro retweeted a post from his job about worker strikes at Smithfield and John Deere factories. He included the comment “proud of my mom for walking out of her job in solidarity with her coworkers even though she's set to retire in a few months!!”

Isabel was also proud. She said it’s because her mom is finally showing people the reason why the Ortiz children are so strong. They learned it from their mom and their family.

“And it's because at the end of the day, communities will come together to solve the issues that leadership aren't going to solve, or at least to do what we can,” Alejandro said.

A clinical psychologist at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte named Richard Tedeschi has studied families and individuals that have shown the same reactions as the Ortiz family after a traumatic event. Tedeschi said traumatic events can be anything from severe isolation to contracting deadly viruses during a time of high economic stress.

Tedeschi found some people respond to trauma in a positive way, exhibiting a sense of post-traumatic growth--a term he and a colleague coined in 1995. It means a traumatic event has caused a positive change in a person’s life. And one thing Tedeschi found to be integral to an individual experiencing post-traumatic growth is the existence of an expert companion. This can be anyone who listens and offers empathy to the person going through a traumatic event--like a group of family members.

On the cover of one of his most recent books, Transformed by Trauma: Stories of Posttraumatic Growth, there’s a blue pot on the cover. There are gold seams trailing up and around the bowl that are holding its pieces together. It’s showing the Japanese art of Kintsugi pottery.

“[It’s] the underlying philosophy that what is broken can be put together in a more beautiful form. And that's sort of what we're talking about with people here. And people's lives. Their lives have been broken up in some way. But then pieced back together in a way that's different, obviously different, but has greater beauty to it,” Tedeschi explained.

12162021-Ortiz-Family
Isabel Djaroun
/
The Ortiz children and grandchildren dressed as the Flintstones for Halloween one year. The tight-knit family tends to find humor and a way to laugh for any situation.

It wasn’t an easy journey, but now everyone in the Ortiz family is now vaccinated, except for baby Nadia, who is too young. Isabel said one day she’ll tell her young daughter about her first year on earth, and how important family is in overcoming life’s changeups.

Vaccines are widely available and Tyson Foods said nearly all of its employees have gotten vaccinated, but that doesn’t mean Alejandro’s job has gotten any easier.

You know, it’s a learning process and a lot of it was a struggle. I still feel very proud of what's happened and…I've learned so much. And I think a lot of people have learned so much. And I don't think we're in the same world as we were back then. And to a large extent, we've learned a lot of good lessons.
Alejandro Murguia-Ortiz

Almost every day, Alejandro makes and receives calls about other injustices still present in Iowa. At times, he admits he has to shut off his phone to have time to breathe. But he’s found a way to have balance in his life.

His latest project is running for Iowa State Senate in District 17.

“One of the biggest things that I learned about leadership is that, if you’re a leader, but you’re making top-down decisions, you’re not actually going to address the needs. You’re just going to try to put a Band-Aid on something. If you’re a leader, and you’re not having conversations with people and you’re not letting that guide the work that you’re doing, then you’re not actually a leader,” he said.

At a letter-to-the-editor training, Alejandro gave his “students” pointers on what to include in letters to get people’s attention. His last piece of advice before ending the hour-long session: If you care, other people probably do too. They just haven’t spoken up yet.

*Micaela and Martín’s interviews were translated from Spanish

Español

Isabel Djaroun está con su madre en el salón de su casa de Sioux City. La hija de Isabel, Nadia, de un mes de edad, estaba sentada en su columpio morado y blanco. Las dos mujeres mayores se inclinaban sobre una enorme olla plateada que suele reservarse para el pozole, un tipo de guiso mexicano.

Isabel y Micaela Ortiz sostenían una manta marrón sobre sus cabezas. Era el primer edredón matrimonial de Isabel, y era la pieza de tela más grande que poseían. Funcionaba perfectamente para hacer una sauna sobre la gran olla. Y en lugar de estofado, la olla gigante contenía una vieja receta familiar de especias y hierbas para ayudar a limpiar sus pulmones. De vez en cuando, Isabel removía el humeante brebaje caliente con una cuchara de madera. Esa cuchara todavía le produce recuerdos.

Las tres generaciones de mujeres habían estado expuestas al COVID-19. Y la sauna improvisada les proporcionaba cierto alivio, el suficiente para poder respirar mejor.

Isabel cree que su marido Massi trajo inicialmente el virus de una empacadora de carne en Dakota City, Nebraska, donde trabaja como traductor. Dice que también podría haber sido su cuñado, que también trabajaba muchas horas en la misma planta. O, pensándolo bien, podría haber sido su madre, que trabajaba en otra empacadora de carne en Sioux City.

Lo que Isabel sabe con seguridad es que todos los adultos de su casa dieron positivo. Ella había estado en casa de baja por maternidad cuando un día, Massi entró por la puerta quejándose de algunos síntomas. Ya no podía oler los aromas de la cocina mexicana desde la cocina. Curiosamente, no podía saborear el chile picante que Isabel le había preparado para comer ese día.

Isabel sabía que eso era un síntoma del virus que ya había matado a varios de sus amigos, clientes y seres queridos. E hizo lo único que podía hacer. Se hizo una prueba de COVID esa semana.

Y esperó dos días.

Cuando sonó su teléfono, era el servicio de urgencias con la noticia de sus resultados positivos de COVID-19.

Fue como si un maremoto hubiera golpeado a la familia.

Isabel se encerró en su habitación. Su madre se ocupó de la pequeña Nadia. Su padre, Martín, estaba en el hospital con neumonía. Y ella no podía hacer nada.

Isabel se retorcía las manos, sola en su habitación, mientras su recién nacida lloraba justo al otro lado de la pared. La puerta cerrada se burlaba silenciosamente de ella. Era tan fácil de abrir, pero si lo hacía, se arriesgaba a poner en peligro a su hija.

Tanta preocupación le estaba pasando factura. Sentía que se le cerraba la garganta. Mientras su familia llamaba al hospital para informarles de que una persona infectada por COVID estaba en camino, las imágenes de Nadia creciendo sin madre inundaban la mente de Isabel.

Isabel se enteró en el hospital de que había sufrido un grave ataque de ansiedad. Dio gracias a Dios de que no fuera causado por COVID-19.

Incluso recordando los recuerdos, las lágrimas cayeron por las mejillas de Isabel y sobre su largo pelo castaño. Sigue luchando contra la ansiedad; para ella, es una de las condiciones subyacentes a largo plazo de haber sobrevivido al COVID-19.

Mientras el COVID se abría paso desde el marido de Isabel, hasta ella misma, hasta Micaela, la familia dependía de los otros tres hermanos para hacer recados, llevarles medicinas y distraerlos del hecho de que tenían una enfermedad que había matado a miles de personas en el estado, y en su comunidad. Muchas de sus víctimas habían sido inmigrantes y trabajadores de plantas de procesamiento de carne.

Las plantas de envasado de carne de Iowa sufrieron algunos de los peores brotes masivos de COVID-19 en el estado. El gobierno federal declaró a las plantas empacadoras de carne entre las instalaciones esenciales que debían permanecer abiertas. Iowa comenzó a ganar la atención nacional cuando las plantas comenzaron a cerrar después de que demasiados de sus empleados se infectaran. Las instalaciones empacadoras de carne del estado se encontraban entre las incluidas en una investigación federal sobre los brotes de coronavirus en dichas instalaciones.

Cientos de trabajadores de las empacadoras de carne han muerto a causa de la enfermedad y decenas de miles han dado positivo, según la Red de Información sobre Alimentación y Medio Ambiente. La mayoría de los casos se concentran en Iowa y en Nebraska y Dakota del Sur. La mayor parte de los casos positivos y de las muertes entre los trabajadores de la empacadora de carne en Iowa se produjeron en Tyson Foods. Allí es donde trabajaba Martín. (Desde entonces ha dejado de trabajar y está de baja por incapacidad prolongada).

Micaela trabaja en la planta de Smithfield en Sioux City. Varias de las otras plantas de la empresa cerraron temporalmente en medio de las designaciones de puntos calientes de COVID-19. Smithfield también se enfrentó a una infracción de la OSHA y, a principios de este año, llegó a un acuerdo con el gobierno federal para cambiar una serie de procedimientos sanitarios relacionados con las enfermedades infecciosas.

La familia dependía en gran medida del menor de los Ortiz, Alejandro.

A los 25 años, Alejandro Murguia-Ortiz se sentía como si tuviera el mundo sobre sus hombros. Sabiendo que era la “única opción” de su familia, Alejandro condujo las casi tres horas que separan Des Moines de Sioux City para cuidar de su padre mientras todos los demás estaban en cuarentena con COVID en casa de Isabel. Recuerda haber saludado a su madre desde la ventana delantera de la pequeña casa azul. Ella desde dentro y él desde fuera con una lámina de cristal como protección.

Una noche, Alejandro reconoce que lloró. Se secó las lágrimas inducidas por el estrés y la preocupación por su familia. Su madre no iba al médico porque consideraba que el sistema sanitario es demasiado complicado para quienes no son ciudadanos estadounidenses. Todavía está estudiando para su examen de ciudadanía estadounidense.

Dijo que la simple idea de pedir comida le parecía demasiado, con el aumento de las facturas por la atención hospitalaria de Martín.

Y su familia era sólo uno de los casos que Alejandro había tenido que asumir. Acababa de aceptar un nuevo trabajo como organizador comunitario para una organización sin fines de lucro que ayuda a los inmigrantes y a otras comunidades desatendidas en Iowa. Por eso, cuando lloraba, las lágrimas no eran sólo por su familia, sino también por las familias que se enfrentaban a los agentes de inmigración, las familias cuyos seres queridos habían muerto, las familias con dificultades económicas.

Los hombros de Alejandro caen al recordar el agotamiento total que se apoderó de él.

Martín sabía que no era fácil para su hijo menor, pero que Alejandro asumiera más responsabilidades no le sorprendió.

Al crecer en Jalisco, en México, siempre fue trabajo, trabajo, trabajo.

Tras un breve titubeo, Martín añade “y la escuela”.

La vida no fue muy diferente para Micaela, que también es del estado mexicano de Jalisco, en la costa oeste. Aunque no fue a la escuela a partir de cuarto de primaria, Micaela recuerda una infancia muy bonita. Ella y sus hermanos no siempre consiguieron lo que querían, pero ella consiguió lo que necesitaba.

Y ambos recuerdan a Alejandro como alguien que no se rendía fácilmente, ni siquiera de niño. Una vez, recuerda Micaela, Alejandro iba en bicicleta. Le encantaba jugar al aire libre. Pero él y sus hermanos no debían alejarse demasiado de la casa. Esta vez, se alejó demasiado con la bicicleta.

Se cayó y se hizo daño en la rodilla. Lloró un rato, pero luego se levantó. Y nunca dejó de montar en bicicleta.

En otra ocasión, dijo Micaela, estaba saltando en el trampolín y se cayó. Se rompió la mano. Todavía hoy le gusta saltar en la cama elástica.

A medida que pasaba el tiempo y su familia se curaba físicamente del virus, Alejandro empezó a centrarse en la divulgación de la vacuna y en asegurarse de que los miembros de su comunidad tuvieran acceso a la información sobre el COVID, en un idioma que entendieran. La mayoría de las veces, dijo, el estado era muy deficiente.

Durante los primeros meses de COVID-19, la gobernadora de Iowa, Kim Reynolds, no contó con intérpretes de español para sus conferencias de prensa semanales. Cuando se introdujo la vacuna, los trabajadores de las empacadoras de carne no fueron considerados en el “nivel uno” en el despliegue. Y en casi todos los condados, algunos trabajadores fueron excluidos de los fondos de ayuda para la pandemia debido a su condición de inmigrantes. (El condado de Johnson recientemente lo aceptó )

Cuando las vacunas estaban disponibles para los trabajadores, las plantas empacadoras de carne organizaron clínicas de vacunación. Pero algunos no se apuntaron. Tyson Foods acabó devolviendo las vacunas a los departamentos de salud locales. La planta de Tyson Foods Perry, en el condado de Dallas, devolvió lo suficiente para duplicar las vacunas del condado en una semana, dijo un portavoz del departamento de salud del condado.

“Creo que gran parte de esto se debe a la confianza que se ha perdido al tratar de obtener información adecuada”, dijo Alejandro. “Creo que la gente está viendo, ya sabes, nuestras estructuras o sistemas por lo que realmente son. Y que son opresivos y que existen para ser así en muchos casos”.

Micaela, su madre, dudó al hablar de su episodio de COVID-19. Finalmente, dijo: “Bueno, no me puse muy mal…”. No perdió el olfato ni el gusto. Lo que recuerda como lo peor fue el aislamiento. A pesar de estar hospitalizado, Martín se sentía igual.

Pero Isabel lo recuerda de forma diferente. Mientras sus padres hablaban, sus ojos se abrieron de par en par y se agarró al reposabrazos de su silla La-Z-Boy. Sacudió la cabeza casi imperceptiblemente. La suave luz amarilla de la habitación brillaba en sus gafas.

Eso demuestra que, al ser inmigrantes en este país, tienen que estar bien con lo que tienen. ¿Sabes? Y creo que por eso no sienten la necesidad de hablar.

Isabel Djaroun

“Me molestaba mucho cuando entrevistaban a mis padres, especialmente a mi padre”, admitió. ” a ambos lo trataban como si, ‘oh, no fue difícil, no es gran cosa’. Pero fue difícil. Súper difícil”.

Sin embargo, todos están de acuerdo, Alejandro, Isabel, sus hermanos y sus padres, en que, de alguna manera, salieron fortalecidos del otro lado. Se visitan más a menudo. Se ríen juntos más a menudo.

Alejandro se ríe al recordar las videoconferencias entre los miembros de la familia durante la separación. Utilizaban Facebook Messenger, que permite a los usuarios cambiar digitalmente sus rostros. Así que cuando hablaban de lo mal que se estaba poniendo el COVID y de cómo iban a mantener bajas las facturas del hospital, era una conversación entre un cocodrilo preocupado, un magnate de la moda con mejillas de arco iris y un unicornio con aureolas brillantes.

Alejandro e Isabel ven a sus padres bajo una nueva luz. No son invencibles. Pero eso es lo que les hace humanos.

Se han dado cuenta de que pueden tomar su destino en sus manos y cuidarse mutuamente a través de las tres generaciones de su familia.

Hace unas semanas, Alejandro retuiteó un post de su trabajo sobre las huelgas de trabajadores en las fábricas de Smithfield y John Deere. Incluyó el comentario “¡¡¡Orgulloso de mi madre por haber abandonado su trabajo en solidaridad con sus compañeros aunque se vaya a jubilar en unos meses!!!”

Isabel también estaba orgullosa. Dijo que es porque su mamá finalmente está mostrando a la gente la razón por la que los niños Ortiz son tan fuertes. Lo aprendieron de su mamá y de su familia.

“Y es porque al final del día, las comunidades se unen para resolver los problemas que el liderazgo no va a resolver, o al menos para hacer lo que podamos”, dijo Alejandro.

Un psicólogo clínico de la Universidad de Carolina del Norte en Charlotte llamado Richard Tedeschi ha estudiado a familias e individuos que han mostrado las mismas reacciones que la familia Ortiz después de un evento traumático. Tedeschi dijo que los eventos traumáticos pueden ser cualquier cosa, desde el aislamiento severo hasta contraer virus mortales durante una época de alto estrés económico.

Tedeschi descubrió que algunas personas responden al trauma de forma positiva, mostrando una sensación de crecimiento postraumático, un término que él y un colega acuñaron en 1995. Significa que un acontecimiento traumático ha provocado un cambio positivo en la vida de una persona. Y algo que Tedeschi descubrió que es fundamental para que una persona experimente un crecimiento postraumático es la existencia de un compañero experto. Éste puede ser cualquier persona que escuche y ofrezca empatía a la persona que está pasando por un acontecimiento traumático, como un grupo de familiares.

En la portada de uno de sus libros más recientes, Transformed by Trauma: Stories of Posttraumatic Growth, hay una maceta azul en la portada. Hay unas líneas doradas que se extienden alrededor de la vasija y que mantienen sus piezas unidas. Muestra el arte japonés de la cerámica Kintsugi.

“La filosofía subyacente es que lo que se rompe se puede unir de forma más bella. Y de eso es de lo que hablamos con la gente aquí. Y de la vida de la gente. Sus vidas se han roto de alguna manera. Pero luego se recomponen de una forma diferente, obviamente diferente, pero con mayor belleza”, explicó Tedeschi.

No fue un camino fácil, pero ahora todos los miembros de la familia Ortiz están vacunados, excepto la bebé Nadia, que es demasiado pequeña. Isabel dijo que un día le contará a su hija pequeña su primer año en la tierra, y lo importante que es la familia para superar los contratiempos de la vida.

Las vacunas están ampliamente disponibles y Tyson Foods dijo que casi todos sus empleados se han vacunado, pero eso no significa que el trabajo de Alejandro sea más fácil.

Ya sabes, es un proceso de aprendizaje y gran parte fue una lucha. Sigo sintiéndome muy orgulloso de lo que ha pasado y… he aprendido mucho. Y creo que mucha gente ha aprendido mucho. Y no creo que estemos en el mismo mundo que entonces. Y en gran medida, hemos aprendido un montón de buenas lecciones.

Alejandro Murguía-Ortiz

Casi todos los días, Alejandro hace y recibe llamadas sobre otras injusticias aún presentes en Iowa. A veces, admite que tiene que apagar el teléfono para tener tiempo de respirar. Pero ha encontrado la manera de tener un equilibrio en su vida.

Su último proyecto es presentarse como candidato al Senado del Estado de Iowa en el Distrito 17.

“Una de las cosas más importantes que he aprendido sobre el liderazgo es que, si eres un líder, pero tomas decisiones de arriba abajo, no vas a atender realmente las necesidades. Sólo vas a tratar de poner una tirita en algo. Si eres un líder y no mantienes conversaciones con la gente y no dejas que eso guíe el trabajo que haces, entonces no eres realmente un líder”, dijo.

En un curso de redacción de cartas, Alejandro dio a sus “alumnos” consejos sobre qué incluir en las cartas para llamar la atención de la gente. Su último consejo antes de terminar la sesión de una hora: Si a ti te importa, probablemente a otras personas también. Sólo que aún no se han manifestado.

La traducción de Hola Iowa.

English
Español
English

Isabel Djaroun stood with her mother in the living room in her home in Sioux City. Isabel’s one-month-old daughter Nadia sat in her purple and white baby swing nearby. The two older women leaned over a giant silver-plated pot that’s usually reserved for pozole, a kind of Mexican stew.

Isabel and Micaela Ortiz held a brown blanket over their heads. It was Isabel’s first marital comforter, and it was the largest piece of fabric they owned. It worked perfectly to make a sauna over the large pot. And instead of stew, the giant pot held an old family recipe of spices and herbs to help clear out their lungs. Occasionally Isabel would stir the steaming hot concoction with a wooden spoon. That spoon still gives her flashback to this day.

The three generations of women had been exposed to COVID-19. And the makeshift sauna provided some relief, just enough to be able to breathe easier.

Isabel believes her husband Massi initially brought home the virus from a meatpacking facility in Dakota City, Nebraska, where he works as a translator. She said it also could also have been her brother-in-law, who was also putting in long hours at the same plant. Or, come to think of it, it could have been her mother who worked at a different meatpacking plant in Sioux City.

What Isabel knows for sure is that all the adults in her home tested positive. She had been home on maternity leave when one day, Massi walked in the door complaining of a few symptoms. He could no longer smell the aromas of Mexican cooking from the kitchen. Oddly, he couldn’t taste the spicy chili Isabel had packed him for lunch that day.

Isabel knew that was a symptom of the virus that had already killed a number of her friends, clients and their loved ones. And she did the only thing she could do. She took a COVID test that week.

And waited for two days.

When her phone rang, it was the urgent care with news of her positive results for COVID-19.

It felt like a tidal wave had hit the family.

Isabel quarantined herself in her room. Her mother took care of baby Nadia. Her father Martín was in the hospital with pneumonia. And she couldn’t do anything.

Isabel wrung her hands, alone in her room, while her newborn cried just on the other side of the wall. The closed door silently mocked her. It was so easy to open, but if she did, she risked putting her daughter at risk.

All the worrying was taking a toll. She felt her throat was closing. Even as her family called the hospital to let them know a COVID-infected person was on the way, images of Nadia growing up without a mother flooded Isabel’s mind.

Isabel learned at the hospital that she had suffered from a severe anxiety attack. She thanked God it wasn’t caused by COVID-19.

12162021-Holding-Baby-With-Gloves
Isabel Djaroun
/
Massi Djaroun had to hold his newborn daughter Nadia with loads of personal protection equipment on. He works in a meatpacking facility as a translator and ended up testing positive for COVID-19.

Even recalling the memories, tears fell down Isabel’s cheeks and on to her long brown hair. She still struggles with anxiety— for her, that’s one of the underlying, long-term conditions of surviving COVID-19.

While COVID made its way from Isabel’s husband, to herself, to Micaela, the family relied on the other three siblings to run errands, bring them medicine and distract them from the fact that they had a disease that had killed thousands in the state, and in their community. Many of its victims had been immigrants and meat processing plant workers.

Meat packing plants in Iowa saw some of the worst mass outbreaks of COVID-19 in the state. The federal government declared meat packing plants among essential facilities that needed to stay open. Iowa started gaining national attention when plants started shutting down after too many of their employees were infected. Meatpacking facilities in the state were among those included in a federal investigation into coronavirus outbreaks in such facilities.

Hundreds of meatpacking workers have died from the disease and tens of thousands have tested positive, according to the Food & Environment Reporting Network. Most of the cases are heavily concentrated across Iowa and into Nebraska and South Dakota. Most of the positive cases and deaths among meatpacking workers in Iowa was at Tyson Foods. That’s where Martín worked. (He has since stopped working and is on long-term disability leave.)

Micaela works at the Smithfield plant in Sioux City. Several of the company’s other plants shut down temporarily amid COVID-19 hotspot designations. Smithfield also faced an OSHA violations and earlier this year, reached a settlement with the federal government to change a number of health procedures relating to infectious diseases.

12162021-Smithfield-Foods-Outbreak
Stephen Groves
/
AP file
In this 2020 file photo, residents cheer and hold thank you signs to greet employees of a Smithfield pork processing plant as they begin their shift in Sioux Falls, S.D.

The family relied heavily on the youngest Ortiz, Alejandro.

At 25 years old, Alejandro Murguia-Ortiz felt like he was balancing the world on his shoulders. Knowing that he was his family’s “only option,” Alejandro drove the almost three hours from Des Moines to Sioux City to care for his dad while everyone else was quarantined with COVID in Isabel’s home. He remembers waving to his mom from the front window of the little blue home. Her from the inside and him from the outside with a sheet of glass as their protection.

One night, Alejandro admits he cried. He wiped away tears induced by stress and worry for his family. His mother didn’t go to the doctor because she felt the health system is too complicated for people who aren’t U.S. citizens. She is still studying for her U.S. citizenship exam.

He said the simple thought of ordering food seemed like too much, with the bills increasing due to hospital care for Martín.

12162021-Alejandro-Walking
Kassidy Arena
/
IPR
Alejandro works as a community organizer for Iowa Migrant Movement for Justice, a nonprofit agency that advocates for immigrants and other underrepresented people in the state. Alejandro didn't realize community organizing was a job until the organization reached out to him about the opening, after seeing his work in the community.

And his family was just one of the cases Alejandro had taken on. He had just taken on a new job as a community organizer for a nonprofit that helps immigrants and other underserved communities in Iowa. So when he cried, the tears weren’t just for his family, but also for the families dealing with immigration agents, the families whose loved ones died, the families struggling financially.

Alejandro’s shoulders fall as he remembers the utter exhaustion that took over him.

12162021-ICE-Rally
Kassidy Arena
/
IPR
Alejandro Murguia-Ortiz leads a rally against unfair treatment from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in downtown Des Moines the summer of 2020.

Martín knew it wasn’t easy for his youngest son, but Alejandro taking on more responsibilities didn’t surprise him.

Growing up in Jalisco, in Mexico, it was always work, work, work.

After a short hesitation, Martín adds “and school.”

Life wasn’t much different for Micaela, who is also from the west coast Mexican state of Jalisco. Although she didn’t go to school after fourth grade, Micaela remembers a childhood that was beautiful. She and her siblings didn’t always get what they wanted, but she got what she needed.

And they both remember Alejandro as not the one to give up easily, even as a child. One time, Micaela remembers, Alejandro was riding his bike. He loved playing outdoors. But, he and his siblings weren’t supposed to get too far from the house. This time, he rode his bike too far away.

He fell and hurt his knee. He cried for a bit, but then he got up. And, he never stopped riding his bike.

Another time, Micaela said, he was jumping on the trampoline and fell off. He broke his hand. He still loves jumping on the trampoline today.

As time passed and his family healed physically from the virus, Alejandro began focusing on vaccine outreach and making sure his community members had access to COVID information, in a language they understand. Most times, he said the state was severely lacking.

For the first few months of COVID-19, Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds didn’t have Spanish interpreters for her weekly press conferences. When the vaccine was introduced, meatpacking workers weren’t considered in “tier one” in the rollout. And in almost all counties, some workers were excluded from pandemic relief funding due to their immigration status. (Johnson County recently agreed to using some of their American Rescue Plan Act funds for these excluded workers.)

12162021-Micaela-And-Nadia
Isabel Djaroun
/
Micaela Ortiz poses for a photo with her first granddaughter Nadia (Isabel's daughter). Nadia loves snacks and saying hello during interviews. Isabel and Massi are raising Nadia to be trilingual.

When vaccines were available to workers, meat packing plants organized vaccination clinics. But some people didn’t sign up. Tyson Foods ended up returning vaccines to local health departments. The Tyson Foods Perry plant in Dallas County returned enough to double the county’s vaccinations one week, a spokesperson for the county health department said.

“I think much of that is just because of the trust that has been lost in trying to get adequate information,” Alejandro said. “I think people are seeing, you know, our structures or systems for what they truly are. And that they are oppressive and that they exist to be that way in many cases.”

Micaela, his mom, hesitated when talking about her bout of COVID-19. Eventually, she said “Well, I didn’t get too bad…” She didn’t lose her smell or her taste. It was the isolation that she remembers as being the worst part. Despite being hospitalized, Martín felt the same way.

But Isabel remembers it differently. As her parents spoke, her eyes widened and she gripped the armrest of her La-Z-Boy chair. She shook her head almost imperceptibly. The soft yellow light of the room glinted off her glasses.

That just shows from, you know, them being immigrants to this country is, they have to be okay with what they have. You know? And I think that’s why they don’t feel like they need to speak up.
Isabel Djaroun

“I was kind of getting really annoyed when my parents were getting interviewed, especially with my dad,” she admitted. “They both were treating it like, ‘oh, it was not hard, no big deal.’ But it was hard! Super super hard.”

They can all agree though, Alejandro, Isabel, their siblings and parents, that somehow, they came out the other side stronger. They visit each other more often. They laugh together more often.

Alejandro chuckles as he remembers the video conference calls between family members during the separation. They used Facebook Messenger, which allows users to digitally change their faces. So when they talked about how bad COVID was getting and how they would keep hospital bills low, it was a conversation among a concerned crocodile, rainbow-cheeked fashion mogul and shiny-auraed unicorn.

Alejandro and Isabel see their parents in a new light. They’re not invincible. But that’s what makes them human.

They realized they can take their fate in their own hands and take care of one another across the three generations of their family.

A few weeks ago, Alejandro retweeted a post from his job about worker strikes at Smithfield and John Deere factories. He included the comment “proud of my mom for walking out of her job in solidarity with her coworkers even though she's set to retire in a few months!!”

Isabel was also proud. She said it’s because her mom is finally showing people the reason why the Ortiz children are so strong. They learned it from their mom and their family.

“And it's because at the end of the day, communities will come together to solve the issues that leadership aren't going to solve, or at least to do what we can,” Alejandro said.

A clinical psychologist at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte named Richard Tedeschi has studied families and individuals that have shown the same reactions as the Ortiz family after a traumatic event. Tedeschi said traumatic events can be anything from severe isolation to contracting deadly viruses during a time of high economic stress.

Tedeschi found some people respond to trauma in a positive way, exhibiting a sense of post-traumatic growth--a term he and a colleague coined in 1995. It means a traumatic event has caused a positive change in a person’s life. And one thing Tedeschi found to be integral to an individual experiencing post-traumatic growth is the existence of an expert companion. This can be anyone who listens and offers empathy to the person going through a traumatic event--like a group of family members.

On the cover of one of his most recent books, Transformed by Trauma: Stories of Posttraumatic Growth, there’s a blue pot on the cover. There are gold seams trailing up and around the bowl that are holding its pieces together. It’s showing the Japanese art of Kintsugi pottery.

“[It’s] the underlying philosophy that what is broken can be put together in a more beautiful form. And that's sort of what we're talking about with people here. And people's lives. Their lives have been broken up in some way. But then pieced back together in a way that's different, obviously different, but has greater beauty to it,” Tedeschi explained.

12162021-Ortiz-Family
Isabel Djaroun
/
The Ortiz children and grandchildren dressed as the Flintstones for Halloween one year. The tight-knit family tends to find humor and a way to laugh for any situation.

It wasn’t an easy journey, but now everyone in the Ortiz family is now vaccinated, except for baby Nadia, who is too young. Isabel said one day she’ll tell her young daughter about her first year on earth, and how important family is in overcoming life’s changeups.

Vaccines are widely available and Tyson Foods said nearly all of its employees have gotten vaccinated, but that doesn’t mean Alejandro’s job has gotten any easier.

You know, it’s a learning process and a lot of it was a struggle. I still feel very proud of what's happened and…I've learned so much. And I think a lot of people have learned so much. And I don't think we're in the same world as we were back then. And to a large extent, we've learned a lot of good lessons.
Alejandro Murguia-Ortiz

Almost every day, Alejandro makes and receives calls about other injustices still present in Iowa. At times, he admits he has to shut off his phone to have time to breathe. But he’s found a way to have balance in his life.

His latest project is running for Iowa State Senate in District 17.

“One of the biggest things that I learned about leadership is that, if you’re a leader, but you’re making top-down decisions, you’re not actually going to address the needs. You’re just going to try to put a Band-Aid on something. If you’re a leader, and you’re not having conversations with people and you’re not letting that guide the work that you’re doing, then you’re not actually a leader,” he said.

At a letter-to-the-editor training, Alejandro gave his “students” pointers on what to include in letters to get people’s attention. His last piece of advice before ending the hour-long session: If you care, other people probably do too. They just haven’t spoken up yet.

*Micaela and Martín’s interviews were translated from Spanish

Español

Isabel Djaroun está con su madre en el salón de su casa de Sioux City. La hija de Isabel, Nadia, de un mes de edad, estaba sentada en su columpio morado y blanco. Las dos mujeres mayores se inclinaban sobre una enorme olla plateada que suele reservarse para el pozole, un tipo de guiso mexicano.

Isabel y Micaela Ortiz sostenían una manta marrón sobre sus cabezas. Era el primer edredón matrimonial de Isabel, y era la pieza de tela más grande que poseían. Funcionaba perfectamente para hacer una sauna sobre la gran olla. Y en lugar de estofado, la olla gigante contenía una vieja receta familiar de especias y hierbas para ayudar a limpiar sus pulmones. De vez en cuando, Isabel removía el humeante brebaje caliente con una cuchara de madera. Esa cuchara todavía le produce recuerdos.

Las tres generaciones de mujeres habían estado expuestas al COVID-19. Y la sauna improvisada les proporcionaba cierto alivio, el suficiente para poder respirar mejor.

Isabel cree que su marido Massi trajo inicialmente el virus de una empacadora de carne en Dakota City, Nebraska, donde trabaja como traductor. Dice que también podría haber sido su cuñado, que también trabajaba muchas horas en la misma planta. O, pensándolo bien, podría haber sido su madre, que trabajaba en otra empacadora de carne en Sioux City.

Lo que Isabel sabe con seguridad es que todos los adultos de su casa dieron positivo. Ella había estado en casa de baja por maternidad cuando un día, Massi entró por la puerta quejándose de algunos síntomas. Ya no podía oler los aromas de la cocina mexicana desde la cocina. Curiosamente, no podía saborear el chile picante que Isabel le había preparado para comer ese día.

Isabel sabía que eso era un síntoma del virus que ya había matado a varios de sus amigos, clientes y seres queridos. E hizo lo único que podía hacer. Se hizo una prueba de COVID esa semana.

Y esperó dos días.

Cuando sonó su teléfono, era el servicio de urgencias con la noticia de sus resultados positivos de COVID-19.

Fue como si un maremoto hubiera golpeado a la familia.

Isabel se encerró en su habitación. Su madre se ocupó de la pequeña Nadia. Su padre, Martín, estaba en el hospital con neumonía. Y ella no podía hacer nada.

Isabel se retorcía las manos, sola en su habitación, mientras su recién nacida lloraba justo al otro lado de la pared. La puerta cerrada se burlaba silenciosamente de ella. Era tan fácil de abrir, pero si lo hacía, se arriesgaba a poner en peligro a su hija.

Tanta preocupación le estaba pasando factura. Sentía que se le cerraba la garganta. Mientras su familia llamaba al hospital para informarles de que una persona infectada por COVID estaba en camino, las imágenes de Nadia creciendo sin madre inundaban la mente de Isabel.

Isabel se enteró en el hospital de que había sufrido un grave ataque de ansiedad. Dio gracias a Dios de que no fuera causado por COVID-19.

Incluso recordando los recuerdos, las lágrimas cayeron por las mejillas de Isabel y sobre su largo pelo castaño. Sigue luchando contra la ansiedad; para ella, es una de las condiciones subyacentes a largo plazo de haber sobrevivido al COVID-19.

Mientras el COVID se abría paso desde el marido de Isabel, hasta ella misma, hasta Micaela, la familia dependía de los otros tres hermanos para hacer recados, llevarles medicinas y distraerlos del hecho de que tenían una enfermedad que había matado a miles de personas en el estado, y en su comunidad. Muchas de sus víctimas habían sido inmigrantes y trabajadores de plantas de procesamiento de carne.

Las plantas de envasado de carne de Iowa sufrieron algunos de los peores brotes masivos de COVID-19 en el estado. El gobierno federal declaró a las plantas empacadoras de carne entre las instalaciones esenciales que debían permanecer abiertas. Iowa comenzó a ganar la atención nacional cuando las plantas comenzaron a cerrar después de que demasiados de sus empleados se infectaran. Las instalaciones empacadoras de carne del estado se encontraban entre las incluidas en una investigación federal sobre los brotes de coronavirus en dichas instalaciones.

Cientos de trabajadores de las empacadoras de carne han muerto a causa de la enfermedad y decenas de miles han dado positivo, según la Red de Información sobre Alimentación y Medio Ambiente. La mayoría de los casos se concentran en Iowa y en Nebraska y Dakota del Sur. La mayor parte de los casos positivos y de las muertes entre los trabajadores de la empacadora de carne en Iowa se produjeron en Tyson Foods. Allí es donde trabajaba Martín. (Desde entonces ha dejado de trabajar y está de baja por incapacidad prolongada).

Micaela trabaja en la planta de Smithfield en Sioux City. Varias de las otras plantas de la empresa cerraron temporalmente en medio de las designaciones de puntos calientes de COVID-19. Smithfield también se enfrentó a una infracción de la OSHA y, a principios de este año, llegó a un acuerdo con el gobierno federal para cambiar una serie de procedimientos sanitarios relacionados con las enfermedades infecciosas.

La familia dependía en gran medida del menor de los Ortiz, Alejandro.

A los 25 años, Alejandro Murguia-Ortiz se sentía como si tuviera el mundo sobre sus hombros. Sabiendo que era la “única opción” de su familia, Alejandro condujo las casi tres horas que separan Des Moines de Sioux City para cuidar de su padre mientras todos los demás estaban en cuarentena con COVID en casa de Isabel. Recuerda haber saludado a su madre desde la ventana delantera de la pequeña casa azul. Ella desde dentro y él desde fuera con una lámina de cristal como protección.

Una noche, Alejandro reconoce que lloró. Se secó las lágrimas inducidas por el estrés y la preocupación por su familia. Su madre no iba al médico porque consideraba que el sistema sanitario es demasiado complicado para quienes no son ciudadanos estadounidenses. Todavía está estudiando para su examen de ciudadanía estadounidense.

Dijo que la simple idea de pedir comida le parecía demasiado, con el aumento de las facturas por la atención hospitalaria de Martín.

Y su familia era sólo uno de los casos que Alejandro había tenido que asumir. Acababa de aceptar un nuevo trabajo como organizador comunitario para una organización sin fines de lucro que ayuda a los inmigrantes y a otras comunidades desatendidas en Iowa. Por eso, cuando lloraba, las lágrimas no eran sólo por su familia, sino también por las familias que se enfrentaban a los agentes de inmigración, las familias cuyos seres queridos habían muerto, las familias con dificultades económicas.

Los hombros de Alejandro caen al recordar el agotamiento total que se apoderó de él.

Martín sabía que no era fácil para su hijo menor, pero que Alejandro asumiera más responsabilidades no le sorprendió.

Al crecer en Jalisco, en México, siempre fue trabajo, trabajo, trabajo.

Tras un breve titubeo, Martín añade “y la escuela”.

La vida no fue muy diferente para Micaela, que también es del estado mexicano de Jalisco, en la costa oeste. Aunque no fue a la escuela a partir de cuarto de primaria, Micaela recuerda una infancia muy bonita. Ella y sus hermanos no siempre consiguieron lo que querían, pero ella consiguió lo que necesitaba.

Y ambos recuerdan a Alejandro como alguien que no se rendía fácilmente, ni siquiera de niño. Una vez, recuerda Micaela, Alejandro iba en bicicleta. Le encantaba jugar al aire libre. Pero él y sus hermanos no debían alejarse demasiado de la casa. Esta vez, se alejó demasiado con la bicicleta.

Se cayó y se hizo daño en la rodilla. Lloró un rato, pero luego se levantó. Y nunca dejó de montar en bicicleta.

En otra ocasión, dijo Micaela, estaba saltando en el trampolín y se cayó. Se rompió la mano. Todavía hoy le gusta saltar en la cama elástica.

A medida que pasaba el tiempo y su familia se curaba físicamente del virus, Alejandro empezó a centrarse en la divulgación de la vacuna y en asegurarse de que los miembros de su comunidad tuvieran acceso a la información sobre el COVID, en un idioma que entendieran. La mayoría de las veces, dijo, el estado era muy deficiente.

Durante los primeros meses de COVID-19, la gobernadora de Iowa, Kim Reynolds, no contó con intérpretes de español para sus conferencias de prensa semanales. Cuando se introdujo la vacuna, los trabajadores de las empacadoras de carne no fueron considerados en el “nivel uno” en el despliegue. Y en casi todos los condados, algunos trabajadores fueron excluidos de los fondos de ayuda para la pandemia debido a su condición de inmigrantes. (El condado de Johnson recientemente lo aceptó )

Cuando las vacunas estaban disponibles para los trabajadores, las plantas empacadoras de carne organizaron clínicas de vacunación. Pero algunos no se apuntaron. Tyson Foods acabó devolviendo las vacunas a los departamentos de salud locales. La planta de Tyson Foods Perry, en el condado de Dallas, devolvió lo suficiente para duplicar las vacunas del condado en una semana, dijo un portavoz del departamento de salud del condado.

“Creo que gran parte de esto se debe a la confianza que se ha perdido al tratar de obtener información adecuada”, dijo Alejandro. “Creo que la gente está viendo, ya sabes, nuestras estructuras o sistemas por lo que realmente son. Y que son opresivos y que existen para ser así en muchos casos”.

Micaela, su madre, dudó al hablar de su episodio de COVID-19. Finalmente, dijo: “Bueno, no me puse muy mal…”. No perdió el olfato ni el gusto. Lo que recuerda como lo peor fue el aislamiento. A pesar de estar hospitalizado, Martín se sentía igual.

Pero Isabel lo recuerda de forma diferente. Mientras sus padres hablaban, sus ojos se abrieron de par en par y se agarró al reposabrazos de su silla La-Z-Boy. Sacudió la cabeza casi imperceptiblemente. La suave luz amarilla de la habitación brillaba en sus gafas.

Eso demuestra que, al ser inmigrantes en este país, tienen que estar bien con lo que tienen. ¿Sabes? Y creo que por eso no sienten la necesidad de hablar.

Isabel Djaroun

“Me molestaba mucho cuando entrevistaban a mis padres, especialmente a mi padre”, admitió. ” a ambos lo trataban como si, ‘oh, no fue difícil, no es gran cosa’. Pero fue difícil. Súper difícil”.

Sin embargo, todos están de acuerdo, Alejandro, Isabel, sus hermanos y sus padres, en que, de alguna manera, salieron fortalecidos del otro lado. Se visitan más a menudo. Se ríen juntos más a menudo.

Alejandro se ríe al recordar las videoconferencias entre los miembros de la familia durante la separación. Utilizaban Facebook Messenger, que permite a los usuarios cambiar digitalmente sus rostros. Así que cuando hablaban de lo mal que se estaba poniendo el COVID y de cómo iban a mantener bajas las facturas del hospital, era una conversación entre un cocodrilo preocupado, un magnate de la moda con mejillas de arco iris y un unicornio con aureolas brillantes.

Alejandro e Isabel ven a sus padres bajo una nueva luz. No son invencibles. Pero eso es lo que les hace humanos.

Se han dado cuenta de que pueden tomar su destino en sus manos y cuidarse mutuamente a través de las tres generaciones de su familia.

Hace unas semanas, Alejandro retuiteó un post de su trabajo sobre las huelgas de trabajadores en las fábricas de Smithfield y John Deere. Incluyó el comentario “¡¡¡Orgulloso de mi madre por haber abandonado su trabajo en solidaridad con sus compañeros aunque se vaya a jubilar en unos meses!!!”

Isabel también estaba orgullosa. Dijo que es porque su mamá finalmente está mostrando a la gente la razón por la que los niños Ortiz son tan fuertes. Lo aprendieron de su mamá y de su familia.

“Y es porque al final del día, las comunidades se unen para resolver los problemas que el liderazgo no va a resolver, o al menos para hacer lo que podamos”, dijo Alejandro.

Un psicólogo clínico de la Universidad de Carolina del Norte en Charlotte llamado Richard Tedeschi ha estudiado a familias e individuos que han mostrado las mismas reacciones que la familia Ortiz después de un evento traumático. Tedeschi dijo que los eventos traumáticos pueden ser cualquier cosa, desde el aislamiento severo hasta contraer virus mortales durante una época de alto estrés económico.

Tedeschi descubrió que algunas personas responden al trauma de forma positiva, mostrando una sensación de crecimiento postraumático, un término que él y un colega acuñaron en 1995. Significa que un acontecimiento traumático ha provocado un cambio positivo en la vida de una persona. Y algo que Tedeschi descubrió que es fundamental para que una persona experimente un crecimiento postraumático es la existencia de un compañero experto. Éste puede ser cualquier persona que escuche y ofrezca empatía a la persona que está pasando por un acontecimiento traumático, como un grupo de familiares.

En la portada de uno de sus libros más recientes, Transformed by Trauma: Stories of Posttraumatic Growth, hay una maceta azul en la portada. Hay unas líneas doradas que se extienden alrededor de la vasija y que mantienen sus piezas unidas. Muestra el arte japonés de la cerámica Kintsugi.

“La filosofía subyacente es que lo que se rompe se puede unir de forma más bella. Y de eso es de lo que hablamos con la gente aquí. Y de la vida de la gente. Sus vidas se han roto de alguna manera. Pero luego se recomponen de una forma diferente, obviamente diferente, pero con mayor belleza”, explicó Tedeschi.

No fue un camino fácil, pero ahora todos los miembros de la familia Ortiz están vacunados, excepto la bebé Nadia, que es demasiado pequeña. Isabel dijo que un día le contará a su hija pequeña su primer año en la tierra, y lo importante que es la familia para superar los contratiempos de la vida.

Las vacunas están ampliamente disponibles y Tyson Foods dijo que casi todos sus empleados se han vacunado, pero eso no significa que el trabajo de Alejandro sea más fácil.

Ya sabes, es un proceso de aprendizaje y gran parte fue una lucha. Sigo sintiéndome muy orgulloso de lo que ha pasado y… he aprendido mucho. Y creo que mucha gente ha aprendido mucho. Y no creo que estemos en el mismo mundo que entonces. Y en gran medida, hemos aprendido un montón de buenas lecciones.

Alejandro Murguía-Ortiz

Casi todos los días, Alejandro hace y recibe llamadas sobre otras injusticias aún presentes en Iowa. A veces, admite que tiene que apagar el teléfono para tener tiempo de respirar. Pero ha encontrado la manera de tener un equilibrio en su vida.

Su último proyecto es presentarse como candidato al Senado del Estado de Iowa en el Distrito 17.

“Una de las cosas más importantes que he aprendido sobre el liderazgo es que, si eres un líder, pero tomas decisiones de arriba abajo, no vas a atender realmente las necesidades. Sólo vas a tratar de poner una tirita en algo. Si eres un líder y no mantienes conversaciones con la gente y no dejas que eso guíe el trabajo que haces, entonces no eres realmente un líder”, dijo.

En un curso de redacción de cartas, Alejandro dio a sus “alumnos” consejos sobre qué incluir en las cartas para llamar la atención de la gente. Su último consejo antes de terminar la sesión de una hora: Si a ti te importa, probablemente a otras personas también. Sólo que aún no se han manifestado.

*Las entrevistas de Micaela y Martín fueron traducidas del español