© 2022 Iowa Public Radio
IPR20012_Website_Header_Option2_NewsNavy.png
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Iowa's meat processing workforce is incredibly diverse. COVID-19 outbreaks at the plants last year exposed many vulnerabilities in this group.

COVID struck the nation's meatpacking plants more than a year ago. But worker safety is still a contentious issue

_DSC6652.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
The Storm Lake Tyson pork plant was the site of a COVID-19 outbreak in May 2020 that affected one-quarter of its workforce.

COVID le pegó duro a las plantas procesadoras de carne del país hace más de un año. Pero la seguridad de los trabajadores sigue siendo un tema polémico

English
Español
Karen
English

In late October, Debbie Berkowitz, a worker safety and health expert and former senior policy advisor for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, sat in front of a Congressional House Subcommittee on the coronavirus and delivered some shocking statistics.

Hearing: How the Meatpacking Industry Failed the Workers Who Feed America

“More workers have died from COVID-19 in the last 18 months in the meat and poultry industry, than died from all work-related causes in the industry in the past 15 years,” she said. “And I bet it's more than that now that we have better numbers.”

Berkowitz testified at a congressional hearing following the release of a report that found more than 59,000 workers at the nation’s top meat processing companies’ plants were infected with the coronavirus in the first year of the pandemic and at least 269 workers died.

These figures were three times higher than previous estimates.

The report is one of the few documents that has offered some insight into the tragic outbreaks that swept through the nation’s meatpacking plants last year.

The virus swept through processing facilities across Iowa, the nation’s top pork producing state, and much of the Midwest and the nation, sending ripples through the $200 billion meatpacking industry.

But a year and a half into the pandemic, many are still searching for answers on the outbreaks while pushing for change.

The nation’s major meatpacking companies have been at the center of concerns over worker safety.

They’ve long maintained they’ve done a lot during this pandemic to protect their workers.

“We've invested hundreds of millions of dollars to transform our facilities with protective measures, everything from temperature scanners, workstation dividers, social distance monitors, masking, and our always on testing program,” said Claudia Coplein, the chief medical officer for Tyson Foods.

Gary Walters, the senior safety director at Smithfield Foods, said they’ve made a long list of changes made under his watch. That includes everything from mandatory masks and social distancing to in-house testing and vaccine clinics.

“We redesigned our plants, in some cases even built additional facilities,” Walters said.

_DSC6666.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
Iowa Public Radio
Top meatpacking companies, including Tyson, have generated record profits during the pandemic due to increased prices and increased consumer demand, according to federal government reports.

Prioritizing profits over worker safety

But the congressional report released in late October painted the companies’ responses in a very different light.

The investigation concluded the top five meat processing companies, which includes JBS, Tyson Foods, Smithfield Foods, Cargill and National Beef, could have done a lot more to prevent worker infections and deaths.

It found companies pushed back against state and federal recommendations for coronavirus precautions early in the pandemic and “prioritized profits and production over worker safety, continuing to employ practices that led to crowded facilities in which the virus spread easily.” That’s while it said federal regulators like OSHA failed to enact regulatory standards.

Following the release of the report, Smithfield Foods reached a settlement with the U.S. Department of Labor, agreeing to make systemic changes to its health procedures and policies relating to infectious diseases. The other companies have yet to reach such settlements.

At the hearing, Berkowitz said companies failed to enact basic health precautions like social distancing as recommended by health officials.

GOP Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks took office in January after the Iowa State Board of Canvassers certified her victory over Democratic candidate Rita Hart. She won by just six votes out of the nearly 400,000 total votes cast, following a recount of the entire district.
Kate Payne
/
IPR File
Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks, a Republican who represents eastern Iowa, pushed back against Berkowitz and the report’s findings.

“What is stunning is that despite CDC recommendations to the public and businesses about using social distancing to slow the spread of COVID, the meat industry decided to thumb their noses at this first recommendation, and just keep those crowded conditions in place,” she said.

Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks, a Republican who represents eastern Iowa, pushed back against Berkowitz and the report’s findings.

She argued plants, like the JBS pork facility in her district of Ottumwa, took aggressive protective measures early on and pointed to the impact that closing the plants had on the food supply chain.

“Do any of you know how many farmers had to euthanize their herds? Do any of you how many farmers committed suicide? Because that happened in my district when farmers had no place to take their hogs or their beef or their chickens,” Miller-Meeks said.

Other top Republicans like former President Donald Trump and Gov. Kim Reynolds also emphasized concerns about the food supply chain.

As the outbreaks swept the nation in the first half of 2020, Trump invoked the Defense Production Act to order the plants to stay open as critical infrastructure to the nation’s food supply chain.

Reynolds strongly supported this.

During a press conference in May 2020 -- where state health officials confirmed an outbreak at a Storm Lake pork processing plant affecting nearly a quarter of its workforce -- Reynolds expressed concern that the state’s pork and beef industry could lose more than $2.7 billion due to short-term plant closures.

“This is devastating for Iowa farmers and producers and it will be felt at all levels. Consumers are already seeing it at the grocery stores with higher prices of meats and limits of how much they can buy, which disproportionately affects lower income Iowans,” she said.

At the same time, Tyson Foods took out full page ads in the nation’s largest newspapers claiming closing the plants was “breaking” the food supply chain and aired national ads that thanked frontline workers for their services, saying their safety was their priority.

But these financial concerns don’t appear to have played out. Top meatpacking companies, including Tyson, have generated record profits during the pandemic due to increased prices and increased consumer demand, according to federal government reports.

Kim Reynolds
Charlie Neibergall
/
AP File
As the outbreaks swept the nation in the first half of 2020, Trump invoked the Defense Production Act to order the plants to stay open as critical infrastructure to the nation’s food supply chain. Reynolds, pictured here in Oct. 2021, strongly supported this.

Recently, Reynolds has defended the need to keep the plants running, adding that meatpacking companies and the state took many measures to properly protect workers like conducting mass testing.

“I was also one of the governors that led with testing surveillance, and so I was able to go into these processing plants and do testing and identify who was testing positive and not,” Reynolds said on a Republican National Committee podcast in September.

“So that the workers that were going in there not only had the appropriate PPE -- protection equipment -- but also knew that the people that they were working with had tested negative.”

‘OSHA needs to prepare for the next pandemic’


Melissa Perry, the chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at George Washington University, has many concerns over worker safety at the plants early on in the pandemic.

Perry said public health officials weren’t always getting the information they needed from companies about the outbreaks to make decisions.

“In epidemiology and public health surveillance, it's data that you need, first and foremost as your bedrock foundation to address any kind of outbreak or any kind of health problem, and so that those systems weren't in place,” she said.

It’s still unclear from state data how many of Iowa’s plant workers were affected.

Iowa state health department data on meatpacking plants outbreaks provided to IPR still lists infection rates that frequently contradict reports from local officials, OSHA inspection reports and even numbers reported in Tyson press releases at the time.

Perry said plants could have taken other measures to prevent the outbreaks, like slowing line speeds so workers could space further apart, which would also have allowed them to keep operating.

Additionally, she said the outbreaks also emphasized the need for OSHA to enact an airborne pathogen standard, which would require establishments, like meatpacking plants, to issue protective measures preventing worker exposure to airborne pathogens, like the coronavirus.

“So much is known about how to prevent the spread of airborne pathogens,” Perry said. “It's just a matter of the will and the organization and the consensus to implement them in plants.”

OSHA currently has a standard only for bloodborne pathogens that was created in the early 1990s during the height of the AIDS epidemic.

Other workers’ rights advocates agree with Perry that there was a severe lack of government oversight at the plants that still needs to be addressed by lawmakers.

Mark Lauritsen, the International Vice President at the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, which represents 260,000 of the nation’s meatpacking and food processing workers, also pointed to OSHA for failing to oversee safety at the plants.

He called their oversight during the outbreaks “non-existent,” and blames leaders like Trump and Reynolds for disempowering the federal and state regulatory agencies during the pandemic.

DSC_2363.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Iowa runs its own federally-approved OSHA program under the state’s Division of Labor, which covers the state’s meatpacking plants. According to records obtained by IPR, Iowa OSHA conducted COVID-19 inspections in six plants that state health officials reported having outbreaks affecting more than 100 workers in spring of 2020.

“They were more concerned about forcing plants to stay open and doing anything they could to keep production up at the expense of, you know, infecting and ultimately killing people that work in those facilities,” Lauritsen said.

Lauritsen said OSHA should have issued an Emergency Temporary Standard, which would have created enforceable regulatory standards requiring employers to protect workers during the pandemic.

This was something echoed in the congressional report, which found last year, federal OSHA issued just nine citations to three meatpacking companies with severe outbreaks, despite receiving over 100 complaints, and significantly scaled back inspections in 2020.

It issued one fine of $13,500 to a plant in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, where more than 1,300 workers were infected. It was the maximum allowed under federal law.

Iowa runs its own federally-approved OSHA program under the state’s Division of Labor, which covers the state’s meatpacking plants.

According to records obtained by IPR, Iowa OSHA conducted COVID-19 inspections in six plants that state health officials reported as having outbreaks affecting more than 100 workers in spring of 2020.

It issued just one citation for $1,914 to the Iowa Premium beef plant in Tama for failing to keep and supply government officials with logs of work-related injuries.

“OSHA needs to prepare for the next pandemic, or the next event that takes place,” Lauritsen said. “And that doesn't matter if it's in healthcare, if it's in meatpacking, or if it's in retail. OSHA needs to be ready, and they need to learn from this.”

‘COVID’s shined a bright spotlight on the conditions of meatpacking workers’

Going forward, some Democrats have said they want to make worker safety a priority.

When President Joe Biden took office in January, he immediately issued an executive order to protect worker health and safety, calling it a “national priority and moral imperative.” This included reviewing OSHA enforcement efforts related to COVID-19

The Biden administration also declined to fight a March federal court ruling that struck down a Trump-era U.S. Department of Agriculture rule allowing pork processing facilities to speed up production lines.

Unions like UFCW and workplace safety experts supported this move, saying that slower lines are safer overall for workers and allow them to be properly socially distanced.

However, the USDA announced in November it will allow nine pork processing facilities, including a JBS plant in Ottumwa, to increase speed lines to determine if it can boost production without endangering worker safety.

In September, the USDA announced it is investing $700 million in grants to farm and food workers impacted by COVID-19 with health and safety costs.

In Iowa, state Rep. Ras Smith, a Democrat from Waterloo, who’s running for governor next year, said he’s introducing legislation in the 2022 session called the Workers Bill of Rights.

Smith said the bill would review Iowa OSHA standards during an infectious disease emergency and also addresses issues like minimum wage requirements for essential workers.

“We also laid out standards of what a safe working environment should look like, making sure there's paid leave for employees who are sick because they work in close quarters and are forced to have to take time off from work,” he said.

Smith introduced a similar bill last session, but it never got a hearing in the Republican-dominated legislature.

Union leaders like Lauritsen say one silver lining from the plant outbreaks is that they’ve brought a lot of interest to an industry that has long remained hidden from the public’s eye.

_DSC6653.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
In August, Tyson Foods became one of the nation’s first major employers and the only major meatpacking company to mandate COVID-19 vaccination for frontline workers. The company announced in late October that more than 96 percent of its active workforce was fully vaccinated.

“It's led to a lot more discussions about longer term fixes to the problems that were plaguing the meatpacking industry, and those discussions are going on now,” he said. “So COVID’s shined a bright spotlight on the conditions of meatpacking workers.”

Lauritsen said thanks to new safety measures at plants and the availability of the vaccine, COVID-19 outbreaks at meatpacking plants are no longer happening.

In August, Tyson Foods became one of the nation’s first major employers and the only major meatpacking company to mandate COVID-19 vaccination for frontline workers.

The company announced in late October that more than 96 percent of its active workforce was fully vaccinated.

Other large meatpacking companies will likely fall under the Biden administration’s requirement that companies with at least 100 employees ensure they are fully vaccinated by Jan. 4 or tested weekly.

Iowa is one of ten states that is part of a lawsuit challenging this requirement, claiming the federal government lacks the constitutional authority to issue the requirement. The mandate is currently on hold pending the challenge.

Lauritsen said going forward, he’s concerned other safety protocols might be slipping in plants due to all the focus on the pandemic for the past year and a half.

“I'm kind of nervous to see how much we've slipped back, just because COVID has taken up all the space,” he said.

Perry said she’s afraid meatpacking worker safety will fall back off the public’s radar entirely as the pandemic dies down.

“I'm concerned that...the new attention won't endure,” she said. “So I think it's something to really emphasize and try to make the public aware of how hidden this industry is.”

Perry said there are many changes in government regulations and industry standards that need to be made — before the next pandemic hits.

This is part one of a three-part series.

This project was produced as part of the 2021 National Fellowship with USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism.

With support from Hola Iowa with Spanish translations.

Español

A finales de octubre, Debbie Berkowitz, experta en seguridad y salud de los trabajadores y ex asesora principal de políticas de la Administración de Seguridad y Salud Ocupacional, se presentó ante un subcomité de la Cámara de Representantes del Congreso sobre el coronavirus y ofreció algunas estadísticas impactantes.

Hearing: How the Meatpacking Industry Failed the Workers Who Feed America

"En los últimos 18 meses han muerto más trabajadores a causa del COVID-19 en la industria cárnica y avícola, que los que han muerto por todas las causas relacionadas con el trabajo en la industria en los últimos 15 años", dijo. "Y apuesto a que es más que eso ahora que tenemos mejores cifras".

Berkowitz testificó en una audiencia en el Congreso tras la publicación de un informe en el que se descubría que más de 59,000 trabajadores de las plantas de las principales empresas procesadoras de carne del país se infectaron con el coronavirus en el primer año de la pandemia y que al menos 269 trabajadores murieron. Cifras que triplicaban las estimaciones anteriores.

El informe es uno de los pocos documentos que ha ofrecido alguna información sobre los trágicos brotes que arrasaron las plantas empacadoras de carne del país el año pasado.

El virus se extendió por las instalaciones de procesamiento de Iowa, el principal estado productor de carne de cerdo del país, así como por gran parte del Medio Oeste y del país, provocando un efecto dominó en la industria empacadora de carne de 200 mil millones de dólares.

Pero un año y medio después de la pandemia, muchos siguen buscando respuestas sobre los brotes, al tiempo que presionan para que se produzcan cambios.

Las principales empresas empacadoras de carne del país han estado en el centro de las preocupaciones sobre la seguridad de los trabajadores.

Hace tiempo que sostienen que han hecho mucho durante esta pandemia para proteger a sus trabajadores.

"Hemos invertido cientos de millones de dólares para transformar nuestras instalaciones con medidas de protección, desde escáneres de temperatura, divisores de puestos de trabajo, monitores de distancia social, enmascaramiento y nuestro programa de pruebas siempre en marcha", dijo Claudia Coplein, directora médica de Tyson Foods.

Gary Walters, director de seguridad de Smithfield Foods, dijo que han realizado una larga lista de cambios bajo su supervisión. Eso incluye todo, desde mascarillas obligatorias y distanciamiento social hasta pruebas internas y clínicas de vacunación.

"Hemos rediseñado nuestras plantas, en algunos casos incluso hemos construido instalaciones adicionales", dijo Walters.

_DSC6666.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
Iowa Public Radio
Top meatpacking companies, including Tyson, have generated record profits during the pandemic due to increased prices and increased consumer demand, according to federal government reports.

Priorizando las ganancias sobre la seguridad de los trabajadores

Sin embargo, el informe del Congreso publicado a finales de octubre pintó las respuestas de las empresas bajo una luz muy diferente.

La investigación concluyó que las cinco principales empresas de procesamiento de carne, entre las que se encuentran JBS, Tyson Foods, Smithfield Foods, Cargill y National Beef, podrían haber hecho mucho más para evitar las infecciones y muertes de los trabajadores.

El informe concluyó que las empresas se opusieron a las recomendaciones estatales y federales de tomar precauciones contra el coronavirus al principio de la pandemia y "dieron prioridad a los beneficios y a la producción por encima de la seguridad de los trabajadores, y siguieron empleando prácticas que condujeron a unas instalaciones abarrotadas en las que el virus se propagó con facilidad". Además, dijo que los reguladores federales, como la OSHA, no promulgaron normas reglamentarias.

Tras la publicación del informe, Smithfield Foods llegó a un acuerdo con el Departamento de Trabajo de EE.UU., aceptando realizar cambios sistémicos en sus procedimientos y políticas sanitarias relacionadas con las enfermedades infecciosas. Las demás empresas aún no han llegado a un acuerdo.

En la audiencia, Berkowitz dijo que las empresas no adoptaron las precauciones sanitarias básicas, como el distanciamiento social, tal como recomiendan las autoridades sanitarias.

GOP Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks took office in January after the Iowa State Board of Canvassers certified her victory over Democratic candidate Rita Hart. She won by just six votes out of the nearly 400,000 total votes cast, following a recount of the entire district.
Kate Payne
/
IPR File
Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks, a Republican who represents eastern Iowa, pushed back against Berkowitz and the report’s findings.

"Lo sorprendente es que, a pesar de las recomendaciones de los CDC al público y a las empresas sobre el uso del distanciamiento social para frenar la propagación del COVID, la industria cárnica decidió hacer caso omiso de esta primera recomendación y mantener esas condiciones de hacinamiento", dijo.

La diputada Mariannette Miller-Meeks, republicana que representa al este de Iowa, se opuso a Berkowitz y a las conclusiones del informe.

Argumentó que las plantas, como la de carne de cerdo de JBS en su distrito de Ottumwa, tomaron medidas de protección agresivas desde el principio y señaló el impacto que el cierre de las plantas tuvo en la cadena de suministro de alimentos.

"¿Sabe alguno de ustedes cuántos ganaderos tuvieron que practicar la eutanasia a sus rebaños? ¿Alguno de ustedes sabe cuántos agricultores se suicidaron? Porque eso ocurrió en mi distrito cuando los granjeros no tenían dónde llevar sus cerdos o su carne o sus pollos", dijo Miller-Meeks.

Otros republicanos de alto nivel, como el ex presidente Donald Trump y la gobernadora Kim Reynolds, también hicieron hincapié en la preocupación por la cadena de suministro de alimentos.

Cuando los brotes barrieron la nación en la primera mitad de 2020, Trump invocó la Ley de Producción de Defensa para ordenar que las plantas permanecieran abiertas como infraestructura crítica para la cadena de suministro de alimentos de la nación.

Reynolds apoyó firmemente esto.

Durante una conferencia de prensa en mayo de 2020 -donde los funcionarios de salud del estado confirmaron un brote en una planta de procesamiento de carne de cerdo de Storm Lake que afectaba a casi una cuarta parte de su fuerza de trabajo- Reynolds expresó su preocupación de que la industria de carne de cerdo y carne de res del estado podría perder más de $ 2.7 mil millones debido a los cierres de plantas a corto plazo.

"Esto es devastador para los agricultores y productores de Iowa y se notará a todos los niveles. Los consumidores ya lo están viendo en las tiendas de comestibles con precios más altos de las carnes y límites de la cantidad que pueden comprar, lo que afecta desproporcionadamente a los habitantes de Iowa con menores ingresos", dijo.

Al mismo tiempo, Tyson Foods publicó anuncios a página completa en los periódicos más importantes del país afirmando que el cierre de las plantas estaba "rompiendo" la cadena de suministro de alimentos y emitió anuncios nacionales en los que agradecía a los trabajadores de primera línea sus servicios, diciendo que su seguridad era su prioridad.

Pero estas preocupaciones financieras no parecen haber dado resultado. Las principales empresas empacadoras de carne, incluida Tyson, han generado ganancias récord durante la pandemia debido al aumento de los precios y a la mayor demanda de los consumidores, según informes del gobierno federal.

Kim Reynolds
Charlie Neibergall
/
AP File
As the outbreaks swept the nation in the first half of 2020, Trump invoked the Defense Production Act to order the plants to stay open as critical infrastructure to the nation’s food supply chain. Reynolds, pictured here in Oct. 2021, strongly supported this.

Recientemente, Reynolds ha defendido la necesidad de mantener las plantas en funcionamiento, diciendo que las empresas empacadoras de carne y el estado tomaron muchas medidas para proteger adecuadamente a los trabajadores, como la realización de pruebas masivas.

"También fui uno de los gobernadores que lideró la vigilancia de las pruebas, y así pude ir a estas plantas de procesamiento y hacer pruebas e identificar quiénes daban positivo y quiénes no", dijo Reynolds en un podcast del Comité Nacional Republicano en septiembre.

"De modo que los trabajadores que entraban allí no sólo tenían el EPP adecuado -equipo de protección- sino que también sabían que las personas con las que trabajaban habían dado negativo en las pruebas".

“La OSHA debe prepararse para la próxima pandemia”

Melissa Perry, presidenta del Departamento de Salud Ambiental y Ocupacional de la Universidad George Washington, tiene muchas preocupaciones sobre la seguridad de los trabajadores en las plantas al principio de la pandemia.

Perry dijo que los funcionarios de salud pública no siempre recibían la información que necesitaban de las empresas sobre los brotes para tomar decisiones.

"En la epidemiología y la vigilancia de la salud pública, lo que se necesita son datos, en primer lugar, como base fundamental para abordar cualquier tipo de brote o cualquier tipo de problema de salud, por lo que esos sistemas no estaban en funcionamiento", dijo.

Todavía no está claro, a partir de los datos estatales, cuántos trabajadores de la planta de Iowa se vieron afectados.

Los datos del departamento de salud del estado de Iowa sobre los brotes de las plantas empacadoras de carne proporcionados a IPR siguen indicando tasas de infección que a menudo contradicen los informes de los funcionarios locales, los informes de inspección de la OSHA e incluso las cifras comunicadas por Tyson en su momento.

Perry dijo que las plantas podrían haber tomado otras medidas para prevenir los brotes, como reducir la velocidad de las líneas para que los trabajadores pudieran espaciarse más, lo que también les habría permitido seguir operando.

Dijo que los brotes también ponen de relieve la necesidad de que la OSHA promulgue una norma sobre patógenos transportados por el aire, que exigiría a los establecimientos, como las empacadoras de carne, la adopción de medidas de protección para evitar la exposición de los trabajadores a patógenos transportados por el aire, como el coronavirus.

"Se sabe mucho sobre cómo prevenir la propagación de patógenos en el aire", dijo Perry. "Sólo es cuestión de voluntad, organización y consenso para aplicarlas en las plantas".

En la actualidad, la OSHA sólo dispone de una norma para los agentes patógenos transmitidos por la sangre, que se creó a principios de la década de 1990, durante el apogeo de la epidemia de sida.

Otros defensores de los derechos de los trabajadores coinciden con Perry en que hubo una grave falta de supervisión gubernamental en las plantas que aún debe ser abordada por los legisladores.

Mark Lauritsen, vicepresidente internacional del sindicato United Food and Commercial Workers Union, que representa a 260,000 trabajadores del sector de la empacadora de carne y del procesamiento de alimentos del país, también señaló a la OSHA por no haber supervisado la seguridad en las plantas.

Calificó su supervisión durante los brotes como "inexistente", y culpa a líderes como Trump y Reynolds de restar poder a las agencias reguladoras federales y estatales durante la pandemia.

DSC_2363.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
Iowa Public Radio
Iowa runs its own federally-approved OSHA program under the state’s Division of Labor, which covers the state’s meatpacking plants. According to records obtained by IPR, Iowa OSHA conducted COVID-19 inspections in six plants that state health officials reported having outbreaks affecting more than 100 workers in spring of 2020.

"Estaban más preocupados por obligar a las plantas a permanecer abiertas y hacer todo lo posible para mantener la producción a expensas de, ya sabes, infectar y, en última instancia, matar a las personas que trabajan en esas instalaciones", dijo Lauritsen.

Lauritsen dijo que la OSHA debería haber emitido una Norma Temporal de Emergencia, que habría creado normas reglamentarias aplicables que exigieran a los empleadores proteger a los trabajadores durante la pandemia.

Esto fue algo de lo que se hizo eco el informe del Congreso, que encontró que el año pasado, la OSHA federal emitió sólo nueve notificaciones a tres empresas empacadoras de carne con brotes graves a pesar de haber recibido más de 100 quejas y de haber reducido significativamente las inspecciones en 2020.

Esto incluye una multa de 13,500 dólares a una planta en Sioux Falls, Dakota del Sur, donde se infectaron más de 1,300 trabajadores. Era el máximo permitido por la ley federal.

Iowa tiene su propio programa OSHA aprobado por el gobierno federal bajo la División de Trabajo del estado, que cubre las plantas empacadoras de carne del estado.

Según los registros obtenidos por IPR, Iowa OSHA llevó a cabo inspecciones COVID-19 en seis plantas que los funcionarios de salud del estado informaron que tenían brotes que afectaban a más de 100 trabajadores en la primavera de 2020.

Sólo emitió una citación por 1,914 dólares a la planta de carne de res Iowa Premium en Tama por no mantener y suministrar a los funcionarios del gobierno los registros de las lesiones relacionadas con el trabajo.

"La OSHA tiene que prepararse para la próxima pandemia o el próximo evento que tenga lugar", dijo Lauritsen. "Y eso no importa si es en la atención sanitaria, si es en la empacadora de carne o si es en el comercio minorista. La OSHA tiene que estar preparada, y tiene que aprender de esto".

‘El COVID ha puesto de manifiesto las condiciones de los trabajadores de las empacadoras de carne’

De cara al futuro, algunos demócratas han dicho que quieren hacer de la seguridad de los trabajadores una prioridad.

Cuando el presidente Joe Biden tomó posesión de su cargo en enero, emitió inmediatamente una orden ejecutiva para proteger la salud y la seguridad de los trabajadores, calificándola de "prioridad nacional e imperativo moral". Esto incluía la revisión de los esfuerzos de aplicación de la OSHA relacionados con el COVID-19

El gobierno de Biden también se negó a luchar contra un fallo de la corte federal de marzo que anuló una norma del Departamento de Agricultura de los Estados Unidos de la era Trump que permitía a las instalaciones de procesamiento de carne de cerdo acelerar las líneas de producción.

Sindicatos como la UFCW y expertos en seguridad laboral apoyaron esta medida, afirmando que las líneas más lentas son más seguras en general para los trabajadores y les permiten una distancia social adecuada.

Sin embargo, el USDA anunció en noviembre que permitirá a nueve instalaciones de procesamiento de carne de cerdo, incluida una planta de JBS en Ottumwa, aumentar la velocidad de las líneas para determinar si puede aumentar la producción sin poner en peligro la seguridad de los trabajadores.

En septiembre, el USDA anunció que está invirtiendo 700 millones de dólares en subsidios para los trabajadores agrícolas y alimentarios afectados por el COVID-19 con los costos de salud y seguridad.

En Iowa, el representante estatal Ras Smith, demócrata de Waterloo, que se presenta como candidato a gobernador el año que viene, dijo que va a presentar una ley en esta sesión llamada "Carta de Derechos de los Trabajadores".

Smith dijo que el proyecto de ley revisaría las normas de Iowa OSHA durante una emergencia de enfermedad infecciosa y también aborda cuestiones como los requisitos de salario mínimo para los trabajadores esenciales.

"También establecimos las normas de lo que debe ser un entorno de trabajo seguro, asegurándose de que hay licencia pagada para los empleados que están enfermos porque trabajan en espacios cerrados y se ven obligados a tener que tomar tiempo libre del trabajo", dijo.

Smith presentó un proyecto de ley similar en la pasada legislatura, pero nunca llegó a ser escuchado en una cámara legislativa dominada por los republicanos.

Líderes sindicales como Lauritsen afirman que uno de los aspectos positivos de los brotes en las plantas es que han suscitado un gran interés en un sector que durante mucho tiempo ha permanecido oculto a los ojos del público.

_DSC6653.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
Iowa Public Radio
In August, Tyson Foods became one of the nation’s first major employers and the only major meatpacking company to mandate COVID-19 vaccination for frontline workers. The company announced in late October that more than 96 percent of its active workforce was fully vaccinated.

"Ha dado lugar a muchos más debates sobre las soluciones a largo plazo de los problemas que aquejaban a la industria empacadora de carne, y esos debates se están llevando a cabo ahora", dijo. "El COVID ha puesto de relieve las condiciones de los trabajadores de las empacadoras de carne".

Lauritsen dijo que gracias a las nuevas medidas de seguridad en las plantas y a la disponibilidad de la vacuna, los brotes de COVID-19 en las empacadoras de carne ya no se producen.

En agosto, Tyson Foods se convirtió en uno de los primeros empleadores importantes del país y en la única gran empresa empacadora de carne en imponer la vacunación contra la COVID-19 a los trabajadores de primera línea.

La empresa anunció a finales de octubre que más del 96% de su plantilla activa estaba totalmente vacunada.

Otras grandes empresas empacadoras de carne probablemente se acogerán a la exigencia de la administración Biden de que las empresas con al menos 100 empleados se aseguren de que están totalmente vacunados antes del 4 de enero o se sometan a pruebas semanales.

Iowa es uno de los diez estados que forman parte de una demanda que desafía este requisito, alegando que el gobierno federal carece de autoridad constitucional para emitirlo.

Lauritsen dijo que, de cara al futuro, le preocupa que otros protocolos de seguridad se desvíen de las plantas debido a toda la atención prestada a la pandemia durante el último año y medio.

"Me pone nervioso ver cuánto hemos retrocedido, sólo porque COVID ha ocupado todo el espacio", dijo.

Perry dijo que teme que la seguridad de los trabajadores de las empacadoras de carne desaparezca por completo del radar de la opinión pública a medida que la pandemia se extinga.

"Me preocupa que... la nueva atención no perdure", dijo. "Así que creo que es algo en lo que hay que hacer hincapié e intentar que el público sea consciente de lo oculta que está esta industria".

Perry dijo que hay muchos cambios en las regulaciones gubernamentales y en las normas de la industria que deben hacerse, antes de que llegue la próxima pandemia.

This is part one in a three part series.

This project was produced as part of the 2021 National Fellowship with USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism.

Con el apoyo de Hola Iowa con las traducciones al español.

Karen

Natalie Krebs is IPR's Health Reporter