© 2022 Iowa Public Radio
IPR20012_Website_Header_Option2_NewsNavy.png
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Iowa's meat processing workforce is incredibly diverse. COVID-19 outbreaks at the plants last year exposed many vulnerabilities in this group.

How one small Iowa city continues to deal with the effects of a major outbreak

Cómo una pequeña ciudad de Iowa sigue lidiando con los efectos de un grande brote de COVID-19

English
Español
Karen
English

Emilia Marroquin has experienced first hand just how much Storm Lake has changed in the past two decades.

On a driving tour of the town, she points to a building out the window of her car.

“The only Mexican restaurant that was in town was on this corner, [and] there were white people running the restaurant,” she said.

Marroquin, a native of El Salvador, moved to Storm Lake with her family in the 1990s from California to escape increasing crime rates. They were tipped off about the small western Iowa town by a friend’s mother.

When Marroquin, her husband and her young son arrived during a snowstorm in November, Marroquin summed up her experience in one word.

“Horrible!”

Marroquin said at first, the family lived in a hotel as they struggled to find housing in Storm Lake.

She knew no one else who spoke Spanish, so she learned to order by number at the Burger King by the hotel.

“I knew the numbers,” she said, with a laugh. “I knew number 8 was for the chicken nuggets for the kids.”

storm-lake-marroquin-daniels.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Di Daniels (left) and Emilia Marroquin are members of Salud, a community-based health organization. Marroquin, a native of El Salvador, moved to Storm Lake from California in the 1990s.

Marroquin and her husband got jobs at the Tyson Foods plant, a job they were able to secure even before leaving California.

She lasted just a few days in the harsh work environment.

“I remember the second day I was crying, saying ‘I’m not coming back to this place. I don’t like it. I hate it,’” she said.

But the family stayed in Storm Lake. Marroquin left Tyson, started a new job, learned English, eventually picked up high school and college degrees, and got involved in many aspects of community life.

She’s now one of many immigrants who proudly call Storm Lake home.

Marroquin points out her window to Chautauqua Park alongside the town’s namesake lake, describing the town’s big Fourth of July celebration.

storm-lake-tree.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Storm Lake sits on its namesake lake, which attracts tourists in the summer to its city-owned resort.

“This is the main area for diverse foods,” she said. “If you want to come, Fourth of July, you can find Mexican food, Ecuadorian food, Asian food, in one place, one spot.”

In a state like Iowa where 85 percent of the population identifies as white alone, according to the most recent census, Storm Lake stands out.

Buena Vista County, where Storm Lake is located, is considered the most diverse county in the state, according to the most recent census.

The town’s official population is 11,269. But most town officials agree it’s likely higher, due to the high number of transient workers and lower than average census turnout rate.

According to the 2020 Census, 37 percent of city residents identify as Hispanic or Latino, nearly the same percentage who identify as white. Nearly one in five identify as Asian.

“It is probably the most unique community in the state of Iowa,” said Mike Porsch, the mayor of Storm Lake.

storm-lake-mike-porsch.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Mike Porsch is the mayor of Storm Lake. Porsch spent much of his childhood in Storm Lake and graduated high school when the town was mostly white. He’s welcomed the demographic shift.

He remembers his graduating class in the 1970s being almost exclusively white. He’s welcomed the change.

“It's so beneficial to the kids that graduate from here because they know what the real world is like,” Porsch said. “I mean it isn’t an all white real world out there.”

Storm Lake’s demographics have shifted dramatically in the past 30 years. According to the 1990 Census, 95 percent of the town identified as white. Just 3.5 percent identified as Asian, and 1 percent identified as Hispanic.

The driving force behind the diversification of Storm Lake is the town’s pork and turkey meatpacking plants. They’re currently owned by Tyson Foods, but have existed in the community under different ownerships for decades.

The plants have pulled in thousands of immigrant workers over the past two decades. They’re the economic center of the town, employing around 3,000 workers.

Immigrant families are vital to smaller, rural communities like Storm Lake that have seen their populations shrink in recent years.

Storm-Lake-Photo-Storm-Fronts.jpg
Storm Lake is home to a population where more than a third identify as Latino or Hispanic and nearly one in five identify as Asian.

They start small businesses and fill vacant positions across town, Porsch said.

“They provide the workforce for our restaurants or cashiers out of, you know, Hy-Vees and Fairways, and they’re receptionists at the clinics,” he said. “I mean, they've filled the job void throughout the community.”

The Tyson plants’ impact is clear just from driving through Storm Lake. The plants can be seen throughout town, poking out behind preschool and cemeteries.

Large steel trucks full of pigs regularly pass through the main roads, just blocks from shores of Storm Lake where Tyson sponsors things like lakeside snack stands.

Tyson signs advertising generous sign on bonuses and starting wages appear everywhere from the lawn in front of City Hall to billboards on Hwy. 71, just across from the lighthouse-themed sign welcoming visitors to Storm Lake.

When Tyson’s pork plant experienced a COVID-19 outbreak in spring of 2020, it sent large ripples through the community.

On May 28, 2020, Tyson announced it was shutting down its pork processing facility for several days after state health officials confirmed the outbreak.

storm-lake-tyson-plant.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
The Tyson facilities can be seen throughout Storm Lake. The first plant opened in the town in the 1930s.

The company put out a press release several days later stating internal testing found 591 of its 2,303 employees at the pork plant tested positive for the virus — or one-quarter of all employees — with 75 percent not showing any symptoms.

Porsch said, at the time, finding the balance between protecting workers and keeping the food supply and the economy going was challenging for Tyson and the community.

“[It’s] kind of a Catch-22,” he said. “You'd really love to have time off work to try to get it under control and then bring workers back. But then the other part is, then you're not providing food for the country.”

‘It was just out of this world’

st-marys-storm-lake.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
St. Mary’s Catholic Church has many parishioners from the immigrant community. Father Brent Lingle (right) and Deacon Hector Mora, who used to work in the Tyson turkey plant, comforted many meatpacking workers during the outbreaks.

Research has shown the spread of COVID-19 was significantly greater in meatpacking communities across the country like Storm Lake.

According to a study in Food Policy, counties with large pork processing facilities saw per capita transmission rates increase 160 percent when compared to counties that didn’t have plants.

Counties with large beef processing plants saw per capita transmission rates increase by 110 percent, while those with chicken processing facilities transmission rates increased 20 percent.

Deacon Hector Mora worked in the Tyson turkey processing plant for more than a decade before he left to work for St. Mary’s Catholic Church in May of last year, the same month as the outbreak at the pork plant.

Mora, who’s originally from Mexico, moved to Storm Lake from nearby Denison after his wife first made the move to work in a Tyson plant. When he quit, he had been a supervisor for three years.

He said he felt Tyson took many precautions to protect workers, but said many workers confided in him at the time that they were really scared.

DSC_2585.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Signs around town advertises higher wages and sign on bonuses to attract more workers as the industry is experiencing a workforce shortage.

“I used to tell them, ‘just calm down, I know we have a bad situation. But don't let these fears be controlling you all the time,’” he said.

The outbreak hit the town’s Microneasian and Latino communities particularly hard, said Father Brent Lingle, who’s been the pastor at the church for two years.

“I would look back at the burials that I did of COVID-related deaths, and a majority of those were from our Micronesian community. Second would be in our Hispanic community,” he said.

The outbreak strained Storm Lake’s health care infrastructure.

At the United Community Health Center, Dr. Natalie Schaller recalls how the federally-qualified health clinic, which services many uninsured patients and underserved communities, made a makeshift COVID clinic out of a conference room.

natalie-schaller-storm-lake.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Natalie Schaller is a doctor at the United Community Health Center in Storm Lake. She works with many meat packing plant workers and their families.

“It was just out of this world. It was unlike anything that I've ever experienced outside of, like, traveling and working in underserved third world countries, I guess,” she said.

Schaller has worked at the clinic for about eight years. Her patients come from a wide variety of cultures. Many are meatpacking workers and their families.

One way she said she’s learned to bridge cultural gaps and build trust with her immigrant patients is to embed herself in their communities and create long-lasting relationships with whole families.

“I might coach some of their children in soccer. And we're there on the weekends together, building a bond and getting to know each other better,” she said.

Schaller said the time period around the outbreak was physically and emotionally draining.

“You know, honestly, just a part of being in this community is knowing and loving some of the people who struggled the most, and ultimately passed away,” she said.

'It does take more time and dollars'

But many say the fallout from seeing so much illness in a small community is ongoing.

storm-lake-high-school-musical.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Students at Storm Lake High School rehearse the fall musical, South Pacific. The school district is one of the most diverse in the state of Iowa.

The Storm Lake School District is one of the most diverse in the state. About 87 percent of students are people of color. Most are immigrants, and 57 percent are English language learners.

“I have to be honest, I think this is the hardest start to the school year I've ever seen,” said Stacey Cole, the district’s superintendent.

She said she’s only beginning to see the long-term impact of the pandemic on students and that many are showing signs of extended trauma.

“We know our kids are reporting anxiety, depression -- all of those types of things that you see when people are struggling with their mental health. We are seeing that at a very increased rate,” she said.

stacey-cole-storm-lake.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Stacey Cole is the superintendent of Storm Lake’s school district. She said many students are struggling with mental health issues related to the pandemic.

Cole said the district has invested more into mental health resources, like virtual therapy options, this year.

Meanwhile, public health officials said the pandemic has really highlighted the need for more funding and support for local departments that serve diverse populations, like Buena Vista County.

“I'm not gonna say we're special, but we are special. We have a very diverse community when you look at the rest of the state, and it does take more time and more dollars,” said Julie Sather, who heads the Buena Vista County Health Department.

Sather said the 13-person department could use more resources like interpreters, instead of relying on outside language lines.

But many in Storm Lake say the community ultimately is full of incredibly resilient people.

julie-sather-storm-lake.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Julie Sather is the head of the Buena Vista County health department. She took the job in February of this year after the previous head retired.

“I look at immigrants and refugees, and I see resilience and stamina and strength,” said Di Daniels, one of the founding members of SALUD, a community health organization.

“I wonder sometimes this is just one more thing, one more hurdle they have to get over?”

Marroquin, who’s also a member of SALUD, agreed that many immigrants like herself have learned resilience through overcoming many challenges, like starting life in a new country.

“If you have been going through the worst things, adapting to COVID will be something that you find a way,” she said.

This project was produced as part of the 2021 National Fellowship with USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism.

With support from Hola Iowa with Spanish translations.

Español

Emilia Marroquín ha experimentado de primera mano lo mucho que ha cambiado Storm Lake en las últimas dos décadas.

En un recorrido por la ciudad, señala un edificio por la ventanilla de su coche.

"El único restaurante mexicano que había en la ciudad estaba en esta esquina, [y] había gente blanca dirigiendo el restaurante", dice.

Marroquín, originaria de El Salvador, se trasladó a Storm Lake con su familia en la década de 1990 desde California para huir de los crecientes índices de delincuencia. La madre de un amigo les habló de la pequeña ciudad del oeste de Iowa.

Cuando Marroquín, su marido y su hijo pequeño llegaron durante una tormenta de nieve en noviembre, Marroquín resumió su experiencia en una palabra.

"¡Horrible!"

Marroquín dijo que al principio, la familia vivió en un hotel mientras que batallaban por encontrar alojamiento en Storm Lake.

No conocía a nadie que hablara español, así que aprendió a pedir por número en el Burger King que había junto al hotel.

"Me sabía los números", dice riendo. "Sabía que el número 8 era para los nuggets de pollo para los niños".

storm-lake-marroquin-daniels.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Di Daniels (left) and Emilia Marroquin are members of Salud, a community-based health organization. Marroquin, a native of El Salvador, moved to Storm Lake from California in the 1990s.

Marroquín y su marido consiguieron trabajo en la planta de Tyson Foods, un empleo que consiguieron incluso antes de salir de California.

Ella duró apenas unos días en el duro ambiente de trabajo.

"Recuerdo que el segundo día estaba llorando, diciendo 'No voy a volver a este lugar. No me gusta. Lo odio'", dijo.

Pero la familia se quedó en Storm Lake. Marroquín dejó Tyson, empezó un nuevo trabajo, aprendió inglés, acabó obteniendo títulos de preparatoria y universidad, y se involucró en muchos aspectos de la vida comunitaria.

Ahora es una de las muchas inmigrantes que con orgullo llaman a Storm Lake su hogar.

Marroquín señala por su ventana el parque Chautauqua, junto al lago que lleva el nombre de la ciudad, y describe la gran celebración del 4 de julio.

storm-lake-tree.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Storm Lake sits on its namesake lake, which attracts tourists in the summer to its city-owned resort.

"Esta es la principal zona de comidas variadas", dice. "Si quieres venir, el 4 de julio, puedes encontrar comida mexicana, ecuatoriana, asiática, en un solo lugar, en un solo sitio".

En un estado como Iowa, donde el 85% de la población se identifica únicamente como blanca, según el censo más reciente, Storm Lake destaca.

El condado de Buena Vista, donde se encuentra Storm Lake, se considera el más diverso del estado, según el censo más reciente.

La población oficial de la ciudad es de 11,269 habitantes. Pero la mayoría de los funcionarios de la ciudad coinciden en que probablemente sea mayor, debido al elevado número de trabajadores transeúntes y a una tasa de participación en el censo inferior a la media.

Según el censo, el 37% de los residentes de la ciudad se identifican como hispanos o latinos, casi el mismo porcentaje que se identifica como blanco. Casi uno de cada cinco se identifica como asiático.

"Es probablemente la comunidad más singular del estado de Iowa", afirma Mike Porsch, alcalde de Storm Lake.

storm-lake-mike-porsch.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Mike Porsch is the mayor of Storm Lake. Porsch spent much of his childhood in Storm Lake and graduated high school when the town was mostly white. He’s welcomed the demographic shift.

Recuerda que su clase de graduados en los años 70 era casi exclusivamente blanca. Ha acogido con satisfacción el cambio.

"Es muy beneficioso para los chicos que se gradúan aquí porque saben cómo es el mundo real", dijo Porsch. "Quiero decir que no es un mundo real exclusivamente blanco el que hay ahí fuera".

La demografía de Storm Lake ha cambiado drásticamente en los últimos 30 años. Según el censo de 1990, el 95% de la población se identificaba como blanca. Sólo el 3.5% se identificaba como asiático y el 1% como hispano.

El motor de la diversificación de Storm Lake son las plantas empacadoras de carne de cerdo y pavo de la ciudad. Actualmente son propiedad de Tyson Foods, pero han existido en la comunidad bajo diferentes propietarios durante décadas.

Las plantas han atraído a miles de trabajadores inmigrantes en las últimas dos décadas. Son el centro económico de la ciudad, ya que emplean a unos 3,000 trabajadores.

Las familias inmigrantes son vitales para las comunidades rurales más pequeñas, como Storm Lake, que han visto disminuir su población en los últimos años.

Storm-Lake-Photo-Storm-Fronts.jpg
Storm Lake is home to a population where more than a third identify as Latino or Hispanic and nearly one in five identify as Asian.

Crean pequeñas empresas y cubren los puestos vacantes en toda la ciudad, dijo Porsch.

"Proporcionan la mano de obra para nuestros restaurantes o cajeros de, ya sabes, HyVees y Fairways, y son recepcionistas en las clínicas", dijo. "Es decir, han llenado el vacío de trabajo en toda la comunidad".

El impacto de las plantas de Tyson es evidente con sólo conducir por Storm Lake. Las plantas se pueden ver por toda la ciudad, asomando detrás de preescolares y cementerios.

Grandes camiones de acero llenos de cerdos pasan regularmente por las carreteras principales, a pocas manzanas de las orillas de Storm Lake, donde Tyson patrocina cosas como puestos de comida junto al lago.

Los carteles de Tyson en los que se anuncian generosas primas y salarios iniciales aparecen por todas partes, desde el césped frente al Ayuntamiento hasta las vallas publicitarias de la autopista 71, justo enfrente del cartel temático del faro que da la bienvenida a Storm Lake.

Cuando la planta de carne de cerdo de Tyson experimentó un brote de COVID-19 en la primavera de 2020, provocó enormes consecuencias en la comunidad.

El 28 de mayo de 2020, Tyson anunció que cerraría su planta de procesamiento de carne de cerdo durante varios días después de que los funcionarios de salud del estado confirmaran el brote.

storm-lake-tyson-plant.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
The Tyson facilities can be seen throughout Storm Lake. The first plant opened in the town in the 1930s.

La empresa emitió un comunicado de prensa varios días después en el que afirmaba que las pruebas internas habían revelado que 591 de sus 2,303 empleados en la planta de carne de cerdo habían dado positivo en el virus, es decir, una cuarta parte de todos los empleados, y que el 75% no mostraba ningún síntoma.

Porsch dijo, en ese momento, que encontrar el equilibrio entre la protección de los trabajadores y el mantenimiento del suministro de alimentos y la economía era un reto para Tyson y la comunidad.

"[Es] una especie de Catch-22", dijo. "Te encantaría tener tiempo libre para tratar de controlar la situación y luego traer a los trabajadores de vuelta. Pero la otra parte es que entonces no estás suministrando alimentos al país".

‘Es algo fuera de lo común’

st-marys-storm-lake.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
St. Mary’s Catholic Church has many parishioners from the immigrant community. Father Brent Lingle (right) and Deacon Hector Mora, who used to work in the Tyson turkey plant, comforted many meatpacking workers during the outbreaks.

Las investigaciones han demostrado que la propagación del COVID-19 fue significativamente mayor en las comunidades empacadoras de carne de todo el país, como Storm Lake.

Según un estudio publicado en Food Policy, los condados con grandes instalaciones de procesamiento de carne de cerdo vieron aumentar las tasas de transmisión per cápita en un 160% en comparación con los condados que no tenían plantas.

Los condados con grandes plantas de procesamiento de carne de res vieron aumentar las tasas de transmisión per cápita en un 110 por ciento, mientras que aquellos con instalaciones de procesamiento de pollo las tasas de transmisión aumentaron un 20 por ciento.

El diácono Héctor Mora trabajó en la planta de procesamiento de pavos de Tyson durante más de una década antes de dejarla para trabajar en la Iglesia Católica de Santa María en mayo del año pasado, el mismo mes en que se produjo el brote en la planta de carne de cerdo.

Mora, que es originario de México, se trasladó a Storm Lake desde la cercana Denison después de que su esposa hiciera la primera mudanza para trabajar en una planta de Tyson. Cuando renunció, había sido supervisor durante tres años.

Dijo que consideraba que Tyson tomaba muchas precauciones para proteger a los trabajadores, pero dijo que muchos trabajadores le confiaron en su momento que estaban realmente asustados.

DSC_2585.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Signs around town advertises higher wages and sign on bonuses to attract more workers as the industry is experiencing a workforce shortage.

"Yo les decía: `sólo cálmense, sé que tenemos una mala situación. Pero no dejen que estos miedos los controlen todo el tiempo'", dijo.

El brote afectó especialmente a las comunidades micronesia y latina de la ciudad, dijo el padre Brent Lingle, que es el párroco de la iglesia desde hace dos años.

"Si miro hacia atrás en los entierros que hice de las muertes relacionadas con el COVID, la mayoría de ellos eran de nuestra comunidad micronesia. El segundo lugar lo ocupa nuestra comunidad hispana", dijo.

El brote puso a prueba la infraestructura sanitaria de Storm Lake.

En el United Community Health Center, la Dra. Natalie Schaller recuerda cómo la clínica de salud calificada por el gobierno federal, que atiende a muchos pacientes sin seguro y a comunidades desatendidas, hizo una clínica COVID improvisada en una sala de conferencias.

natalie-schaller-storm-lake.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Natalie Schaller is a doctor at the United Community Health Center in Storm Lake. She works with many meat packing plant workers and their families.

"Era algo fuera de este mundo. No se parece a nada de lo que he vivido fuera de los viajes y el trabajo en países del tercer mundo desatendidos, supongo", dijo.

Schaller trabaja en la clínica desde hace unos ocho años. Sus pacientes proceden de una gran variedad de culturas. Muchos son trabajadores de la empacadora de carne y sus familias.

Una de las formas en que ha aprendido a salvar las diferencias culturales y a crear confianza con sus pacientes inmigrantes es integrándose en sus comunidades y creando relaciones duraderas con familias enteras.

"Puedo entrenar a algunos de sus hijos en el fútbol. Y los fines de semana estamos juntos, creando un vínculo y conociéndonos mejor", dijo.

Schaller dijo que el periodo de tiempo en torno al brote fue física y emocionalmente agotador.

"Sinceramente, una parte de estar en esta comunidad es conocer y apreciar a algunas de las personas que más han luchado y que al final han fallecido", dijo.

‘Se necesita más tiempo y dinero’

Pero muchos dicen que las consecuencias de ver tanta enfermedad en una comunidad pequeña son continuas.

storm-lake-high-school-musical.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Students at Storm Lake High School rehearse the fall musical, South Pacific. The school district is one of the most diverse in the state of Iowa.

El distrito escolar de Storm Lake es uno de los más diversos del estado. Alrededor del 87% de los estudiantes son personas de color, la mayoría son inmigrantes, y el 57% son estudiantes de inglés.

"Tengo que ser honesta, creo que este es el comienzo de año escolar más duro que he visto nunca", dijo Stacey Cole, la superintendente del distrito.

Dijo que sólo está empezando a ver el impacto a largo plazo de la pandemia en los estudiantes y que muchos están mostrando signos de trauma prolongado.

"Sabemos que nuestros niños están manifestando ansiedad, depresión, todo ese tipo de cosas que se ven cuando la gente tiene problemas con su salud mental. Estamos viendo que en una tasa muy creciente", dijo.

stacey-cole-storm-lake.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Stacey Cole is the superintendent of Storm Lake’s school district. She said many students are struggling with mental health issues related to the pandemic.

Cole dijo que el distrito ha invertido más en recursos de salud mental, como opciones de terapia virtual, este año.

Mientras tanto, los funcionarios de salud pública dijeron que la pandemia realmente ha puesto de relieve la necesidad de más fondos y apoyo para los departamentos locales que sirven a diversas poblaciones, como el Condado de Buena Vista.

"No voy a decir que somos especiales, pero lo somos. Tenemos una comunidad muy diversa cuando se mira al resto del estado, y requiere más tiempo y más dólares", dijo Julie Sather, que dirige el Departamento de Salud del Condado de Buena Vista.

Sather dijo que el departamento de 13 personas podría utilizar más recursos como intérpretes, en lugar de depender de líneas de idiomas externas.

Pero muchos en Storm Lake dicen que, en última instancia, la comunidad está llena de personas increíblemente tenaces.

julie-sather-storm-lake.jpg
Natalie Krebs
/
IPR
Julie Sather is the head of the Buena Vista County health department. She took the job in February of this year after the previous head retired.

"Veo a los inmigrantes y a los refugiados, y veo resistencia y fortaleza", dijo Di Daniels, una de los miembros fundadores de SALUD, una organización de salud comunitaria.

"A veces me pregunto si esto es sólo una cosa más, un obstáculo más que tienen que superar".

Marroquín, que también es miembro de SALUD, coincidió en que muchos inmigrantes como ella han aprendido a resistir a través de la superación de muchos retos, como empezar la vida en un nuevo país.

"Si has pasado por las peores cosas, la adaptación a COVID será algo que hallarás de alguna manera", dijo.

This project was produced as part of the 2021 National Fellowship with USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism.

Con el apoyo de Hola Iowa con las traducciones al español.

Karen