Health

Health

This morning the Iowa State Fair began with activities promoting the one year old Healthiest State Initiative.  It’s also the first day a dozen new food items high in fat or sugar are available, including the double bacon corn dog. 
 

Clare Roth / IPR

In recent months, several small-town Iowa reproductive health care clinics have closed. And now, more may be in danger. Bills introduced this month in Congress threaten to cut Title X funding, which provides for reproductive health care across the nation, and supplies it to places with few other options like rural Iowa.

Dr. Alan Koslow / Facebook

An Iowa doctor is preparing to come home after spending the past couple of weeks doing relief work in a part of the world facing one of the worst refugee crises in memory.

Dr. Alan Koslow is a vascular surgeon from Des Moines. He landed in South Sudan about two weeks ago, in an area where tens of thousands of refugees have been fleeing violence and famine across the border in Sudan.

Koslow spoke with IPR's Sarah McCammon through an internet phone from the South Sudanese capital of Juba.

Bill Leaver is CEO of Iowa Health System, the state's largest network of hospitals and clinics.  He says the ruling will pave the way for more streamlined and prevention-focused healthcare.

Daniela Hartmann / flickr

July 1 is a big date for mental health care in Iowa—that’s the day funding switches over to a redesigned model. The legislature approved a plan to equalize mental health care funding for low income residents across the state.  Some counties are crying foul, saying programs will be gutted. But other’s say the change they say finally gives all counties a level playing field.

Adapting Well

Jun 17, 2012
Pat Blank

As athletes around the world fine tune their skills in order to compete in the London Olympics, another much smaller, specialized group has just completed a four day camp in Cedar Falls.  Iowa Public Radio’s Pat Blank takes us to the Adapted Sports Camp at UNI.

        In the Quad Cities, Davenport’s St. Ambrose University will soon be opening a new program for training physician assistants.
      The job market is good for the female-dominated profession, but class sizes are limited.

Iowa Public Radio’s week-long look at African-Americans in the state continues today with reporter Rob Dillard considering the multiple health risks they face. Blacks have a higher propensity than whites for such chronic diseases as diabetes and heart disease. The occurrence of infant deaths among African-Americans in Iowa is at three times the rate of whites. Rob talked to a number of health professionals about why this is and what, if anything, blacks can do to lower the risks.

This week, Iowa Public Radio has been taking a look at what it means to be a military veteran in the state. Today, Rob Dillard examines the mental problems that sometimes beset veterans after they serve their country. Many turn to booze and drugs to fight off the demons that haunt their dreams after fighting during wartime. Thousands of them wind up on the streets or in homeless camps after they fail to reconnect with family and friends. Rob sees what’s being done in Iowa to help these troubled veterans.

Over the next five days, Iowa Public Radio’s Rob Dillard will be asking the question, “What does it mean to be a military veteran in the state?” The U.S. Census pegs the number of veterans in Iowa at more than 245-thousand. Ask many older veterans what their top concern is, they’ll tell you health care. A third of Iowa’s former service members are aging baby boomers, who served during the Vietnam era. Another 30 percent fought in World War Two or Korea and are growing frailer by the day. Rob tells us access to health care is a major focus for veterans’ groups and hospitals.

By the end of the year researchers at the University of Iowa will likely be one step closer to treating a very rare disorder called Batten Disease. It's an inherited disease that affects children. There's no cure and it's always fatal. Encouraging studies are bringing hope to families throughout the country and, in particular, to a family in Waterloo.

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