Arts and Culture

Courtesy of Gloria Martinez

The Iowa State Fair opened last Thursday and hundreds of thousands of visitors have already passed through the gates to see what this year's fair has to offer. 

For this special Iowa State Fair hour of Talk of Iowa, our host Charity Nebbe visited the fairgrounds the day before it opened. She talks to the fierce competitors of the popular jams, jellies and fruit butter competitions, then introduces a mother-son baking duo who have been competing in the baking contests for the last four years.

Charity Nebbe / IPR

Remember those afternoons at the lake, road trips with the sun blazing through the windshield, hot summer nights? The moments that make up our summer memories are often accompanied by music. 

John Pemble

This program originally aired on 8-15-18.

 

Corn dogs, baby ducks, and a butter cow to boot!

 

The Iowa State Fair is a time-honored tradition for many Iowans, and has gained a reputation for being one of the largest fairs in the nation.

 

Do you remember your first fair? 

Blank Park Zoo


Elvert Barnes — / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

This program originally aired on 1-08-18.

Domestic violence usually happens in private. It is unseen and underreported. Helping a loved one in an abusive relationship can be easier said than done. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with guests about this common type of abuse. The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence reports that one in three women and one in four men in the United States have experienced some kind of violence at the hands of an intimate partner.

Emily Woodbury

This program originally aired on 11-29-17.

Artist Rose Frantzen grew up in Maquoketa and started painting portraits when she was in high school. Since then, she’s gained national and international acclaim for her oil paintings. She lives and works with her husband, Chuck Morris, an acclaimed artist of his own right.

Iowa seems like an unlikely destination for two very successful artists who met in New York City’s Central Park, but Rose Frantzen and Chuck Morris have made Maquoketa their home, their workplace, and an artistic destination.

Kate Payne/IPR

A collaborative art project in Cedar Rapids is helping immigrants and refugees explore the meaning of home by working with clay. The Shifting Ground project grapples with identity, memory and relocation as new Iowans from Central Africa and Latin America make lives for themselves in the U.S.

The Importance of Kids Music

Jul 25, 2019
Image courtesy of IPTV

This program originally aired on 11-09-17.  

Music is a powerful medium, allowing us to access and experience an entire spectrum of feelings. For children, music is an important educational tool as well, and all too often, children's music has a tendency to become bland. Host of IPTV's Kids Club Dan Wardell and musician Jim Sieck are on a mission to create interesting kids music, while also teaching them valuable lessons. One song in particular teaches kids about the alphabet.

Dave Herholz / Flickr

The Des Moines Register's Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa, known as RAGBRAI, is just days away.  The recreational bicycle tour will take place July 21 through July 27 where about 10,000 registered riders from all 50 states and some international will travel through Iowa. 

Emily & Mason Kessinger / flagofdesmoines.com

You know what the American flag looks like, and the Iowa flag is labeled, so you can’t miss it, but does your city have a flag? Cedar Rapids is going through the process of designing a new city flag and there’s a grassroots movement afoot to bring back the Des Moines Flag. But what makes for a good flag design? In this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with several guests about not only good flag design but also what these flags mean to these cities.

Des Moines Metro Opera

Julia Child is famed for her ground-breaking cooking show that brought French cuisine to everyday Americans in an accessible and approachable way. Now, Child's legacy is the subject of a short "Opera 'Bon Appetit,'" produced in partnership with  Des Moines Metro Opera and the Iowa Culinary Institute at Des Moines Area Community College.

Kelly Gau

Edit

On this edition of Talk of Iowa host Charity Nebbe talks with art educators who took part in the state's first ever Iowa Arts Education Summit. Nearly 400 arts educators came together in Des Moines in June to share knowledge and to learn about how to implement Iowa's new Fine Arts Standards, which were adopted in 2017. 

Amy Mayer / IPR file

The annual Des Moines Arts Festival returns this weekend with a new attraction.

"Where Agriculture Meets Art" will display images of female farmers that Marji Guyler-Alaniz photographed as part of her FarmHer project.

FarmHer began as a way to share the untold female stories of agriculture, Guyler-Analiz said during an interview outside a recent event she hosted in downtown Des Moines.

The Diplomats of Solid Sound

"A Higher Place," the new album from the Iowa City based band The Diplomats of Solid Sound is full of great hooks, danceable grooves, big funk sound and clever lyrics. 

The band released it’s first album 18 years ago and has gone through a lot of changes since then. This is album number six and although band members now live all over the country they try to come back together in Iowa once a year to write and make music together. 

Timberland Regional Library

A downed tree may seem like an expensive cleanup project, but to Monica Tiffany, a small business owner from McGregor, a large piece of wood is a blank canvas.

US Departmen of Defense

For ten years, Major General Timothy Orr served as adjutant general for the Iowa National Guard, and his entire career in the guard spans more than 40 years. On this segment of River to River host Ben Kieffer talks with Orr about his recent retirement and the challenges and highlights of overseeing the Iowa National Guard, including combat tours in the Middle East and disaster relief around the country.

Ty Helbach

Singer/songwriter Sarah Vos struggled with her identity as a young adult but found comfort in playing music with her bandmate Dan Wolf, finding shared inspiration in their past pains and hardships.

On this segment of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Milwaukee-based Americana duo Dead Horses. The band discusses how they came together and turned their personal narratives into thoughtful, empathetic movement.

Jason Hsu/flickr creative commons / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

While the school year is winding down, food insecure kids who normally rely on school lunches do have some options. There will be hundreds of meal sites across Iowa this summer where children can go to eat at no charge.

davidwilson1949

You wouldn't expect a world-renowned charcoal and pastel artist like Cecile Houel to move from Paris to the southeastern corner of Iowa, and she didnt either. But Houel fell in love with Iowa, drawing strength and inspiration from the Mississippi River.

In this Talk of Iowa segment, Charity Nebbe talks with Houel about her life and career in Paris, her first impressions of Iowa and what has kept her here, her love of humanity, and her desire to heal through her work.

Richard Koenig

 

Debra Marquart had not originally intended to become an acclaimed poet, a distinguished professor at Iowa State University, or Iowa's next poet laureate. Marquart instead wanted to be a road musician, singing lead for a rock band and traveling from gig to gig, but life took her on a different path. 

In this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Marquart about being named the new Iowa Poet Laureate, her life as a road musician before her literary pursuits, and the impact poetry can have on people.

Jason Garber / Flickr

The 8-track tape was a revolutionary technology that allowed people to play music on-demand in their vehicles. It was a very popular medium in the United States from the mid 1960s to early 1980s, but it's popularity was short-lived.

In this edition of Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks with Bob Anders, who is working to reinvigorate the appeal of the 8-track with his show, "Bob’s 8-Track Garage Sale" on KHOI-FM in Ames.

Like so many kids growing up in the Midwest, singer-songwriter Lissie was eager to leave. But after 15 years in California, the Rock Island, Illinois native has traded in her life on the West Coast for 47 acres and solitude on a rural farm in Northeast Iowa.

IPR/Madeleine King

In 2020, Iowa Public Radio will celebrate 100 years of providing quality public radio service to the state. We are still using at least one piece of equipment that is as old as our broadcast signal, and we've recently restored it to its original glory thanks to a grant from The Dahl Trust.

AP Photo/Kevin Wolf

Right now, many Iowans are observing Ramadan, which is widely considered the holiest month of the Muslim calendar. The month is considered both a joyous celebration and a time of spiritual discipline, with daily fasts from dawn to sundown culminating in the lush three-day festival of Eid al-Fitr.

Gage Skidmore

This conversation originally aired on February 8, 2018.

In the process of inventing a fantasy world, sometimes characters need a whole new language. And that language can bring so much more to the story than just acoustic flavor.

"The moment you create a word, it assumes so much about the world where this language is spoken," says David Peterson, the linguist who developed the Dothraki and Valyrian languages for HBO's Game of Thrones.

Alan Levine

May fourth is a storied date. Some are celebrating Star Wars Day.  In 1919, student protests led to the emergence of some radical political leaders in China as a part of the May Fourth Movement. In 2012, the United Nations declared the date "Anti-Bullying Day."

Add to that list "World Labyrinth Day," which has been organized by the non-profit Labyrinth Society for the last 11 years. 

NPR

Sam Sanders is one of public radio’s freshest voices. Formerly a political reporter for NPR, Sanders now hosts "It’s Been a Minute," a radio show and podcast that explores the week’s biggest news stories alongside cultural interviews.

Remaking the Music of Fred Rogers

Apr 25, 2019
American Libraries / — https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/legalcode

  This conversation originally aired on January 31, 2018

A few years ago, jazz vocalist Keri Johnsrud was talking with another musician about the role of music in children's television programs. 

"We started talking about Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood, and how the music in that program was so integral to the advancement of the stories and messages that he was telling on the program. And how jazz was especially was an important part of the show," she says.

Lunch Lady Land

Apr 24, 2019
Sandy Dyas Photography

This program originally aired on August 8, 2017.

Susan Becker was having a tough time.  Her mother had recently died.  She started feeling like she had made wrong decisions. She wasn't motivated.  She decided there needed to be a change.

She got a job as a lunch lady in Bellevue in northeast Iowa, and she was managing a staff that was many years older than her.  It was challenging, and ultimately it was enjoyable, meaningful, and sparked a renewed outlook on her life.  

Libreshot

The summer travel season is right around the corner, and whether it's a family road trip in the region or a jetsetting destination halfway around the world, we all gather experiences and stories from our travels.

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