Katelyn Harrop

Talk Show Producer

Katelyn Harrop joined Iowa Public Radio as a talk show producer in 2018, where she works on IPR’s national-award winning programs River to River and Talk of Iowa.

Before heading to Iowa, Katelyn was the News Director at WRFI Community Radio in Ithaca, New York where she produced a daily news magazine program, designed and directed the station’s original morning talk show, and co-founded a hyperlocal investigative news exchange. She has also worked as a freelance reporter covering public policy and social movements for digital publications including Vice and ATTN.

Katelyn is a proud Oregonian, and when she’s not in the office you can probably find her scoping out the Midwest’s best live music acts or hiking in Iowa’s Driftless Area.

AP Photo/Pool, John Gaps III

In 2009, the Iowa Supreme Court handed down a unanimous ruling in the case of Varnum v. Brien, making Iowa the third state in the nation to legalize same-sex marriage. 

On this episode of River to River, a look back at the historic decision 10 years later. 

Guests: 

AP Photo/Julio Cortez

Bills exploring medical marijuana and the definition of an "unborn person" are up for discussion at the Iowa Statehouse. 

During this episode of River to River, we take a look at a Senate bill that could further define criminal charges for a nonconsensual termination of pregnancy and discuss a House bill that could expand the program for medical cannabis in the state. 

Pete Damiano

To many of us, the politics of today are unrecognizable compared to the politics of just a couple decades ago. On this episode of River to River, highlights from an event hosted on March 27 at the Englert Theatre in Iowa City looking at the future of U.S. politics ahead of 2020 from a variety of political and analytical perspectives. 

Meskwaki poet Ray Young Bear has been writing poetry for more than half a century, and recently had his poems and prose accepted for publication in The Iowa Review and Native Voices: Indigenous American Poetry, Craft and Conversations.

Young Bear joins this episode of Talk of Iowa to share some of his recent work, and to perform a word song written in Meskwaki. 

U.S. Geological Survey/flickr

56 Iowa counties have received a major emergency declaration due to significant flooding across the Midwest, with flood damage in the state estimated at $1.6 billion according to Governor Reynolds. How you can minimize the impact of flooding on your own home? 

Guest

  • Bill McAnally, home improvement specialist

Our founding fathers gathered in taverns to enjoy lively political conversation over a local brew, and so do we.

This episode of River to River, Pints & Politics” presented by The Gazette and Iowa Public Radio, was recorded live on Thursday, March 21 at Theatre Cedar Rapids.

The conversation was co-hosted by River to River host Ben Kieffer and Gazette investigative reporter Erin Jordan. The panel featured Gazette columnists Lynda Waddington and Adam Sullivan, along with Gazette political reporter James Lynch.

Katie Peikes/Iowa Public Radio

Gov. Kim Reynolds has issued a total of 43 countywide disaster proclamations in response to flooding that began on March 13. 

The impact has been widespread, but communities in southwestern Iowa continue to experience the heaviest impact, with many community members finding themselves displaced and assessing the damages of homes, properties, and businesses.

On this episode of River to River, we hear stories from three communities who continue to feel the effects of last week's flooding. 

This program features conversations with: 

Andrew Bardwell/Flickr

On this episode of River to River, host Ben Kieffer and guest Todd Pettys of the University of Iowa College of Law explore some of the biggest recent cases discussed in the U.S. Supreme Court term, and look ahead to some of the most anticipated cases slated for argument. 

Cases discussed include:

  • Timbs v. Indiana
  • The American Legion v. American Humanist Association
  • Gamble v. United States
  • Department of Commerce v. New York

Wikimedia Commons

 

As the country prepares to celebrate the centennial of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which set the stage for women gaining the right to vote, scholar Sally Roesch Wagner is marking the anniversary by editing  "The Women's Suffragette Movement." The anthology highlights the work of women who led the national campaign for voting rights.

Wagner joins River to River host Ben Kieffer to discuss the collection of writings and the importance of the suffrage movement today. 

Max Pixel

Mary Neubauer and her husband tried to find their way through Iowa's mental health system for years, seeking help and support for their son Sergei, who died by suicide at the age of 18 in 2017. 

"Truly a labyrinth." That's how Neubauer, now an advocate, describes mental health services in Iowa.

Justgrimes/Flickr

More than 70 thousand students would be unable to vote early on their college campuses under a wide-ranging election bill making its way through the Iowa Senate. 

On this "news buzz" edition of River to River, host Emily Woodbury speaks with University of Iowa College Republicans Chair Kyle Apple and Iowa State College Democrats President Taylor Blair to learn about student reactions to the proposed bill. 

Also on this episode:

Deanna Castings/Pexels

For 20 years, readers have been hooked on the adventures of Harry Potter and his friends, with many people finding inspiration in the characters and themes of the books by J.K. Rowling. The very popular podcast "Harry Potter and the Sacred Text" has grown out of that community, and it takes an intentional look at the series and the lessons we can take from it. 

 

The new film, “Sons and Daughters of Thunder” tells the story of the anti-slavery debates that took place at the Ohio Lane theological Seminary in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1834. These controversial meetings, lead by abolitionists, were the first to publically discuss the end of slavery in the U.S. and served as a catalyst for major social activism and change at the seminary and throughout the wider Cincinnati community. 

Wikimedia Commns

Due to deep snow, plenty of ice, wild winds, and frigid temperatures, it has been a long, hard winter for all of us in Iowa. That includes the non-human residents. 

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Wildlife Biologist Jim Pease about the possible impact of harsh winter weather on wild animals here in Iowa.

free stock photos

Research cited by the FCC estimates that almost half of all calls received in 2019 will be spam, and Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller is not pleased. 

On this "news buzz" edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Deputy Attorney General Nathan Blake about the Attorney General's endorsement of a plan aimed at restricting spam calls. 

Also in the hour: 

Gage Skidmore/Flickr

Political scientists Chris Larimer of the University of Northern Iowa and Dave Andersen of Iowa State University join host Ben Kieffer for this Politics Day edition of River to River

In the hour, the trio discuss topics including:

  • U.S. Secretary of State Pompeo's visit to Iowa
  • A new probe into President Trump lead by House Democrats
  • The Senate as a possible roadblock to the president's national emergency declaration
  • Who is in and who is out in the crowded 2020 race for the presidency

Courtesy of Sam Fathallah

The music scene in Iowa and the rest of the Midwest is thriving right now and videographer Sam Fathallah wants everyone to know about it.

That's why Fathallah started Circular Sessions, a video series showcasing the breadth and depth of the Midwestern music scene through interviews and performances. Through the series, Fathallah invites artists including Elizabeth Moen, The Maytags, and Bad Bad Hats into his sun-filled artist's loft for a session that feels as creative as it is intimate. 

“Music in this type of space, in this natural lit open space... it's reminiscent of how music is made, when it's really made. You know, when it's rehearsed in people's living rooms, and in their basements before it even gets to the studio," Fathallah says. "That's what music really looks like especially in Iowa, where folks are just making music in their homes.”

John Pemble/Iowa Public Radio

 

Iowa lawmakers are looking to end the statute of limitations on cases of child sex abuse in Iowa.

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer and Iowa Public Radio Statehouse Reporter Katarina Sostaric discuss two senate bills aimed at eliminating this statute of limitations.They also explore legislation aimed at increasing access to birth control without a visit to the doctor.

 

Justin Hofman/National Geographic

 

Plastic is cheap, easy to manufacture and endlessly flexible. Over the last 70 years plastic has completely transformed the way we live. This innovation has created a global pollution crisis that threatens humans and wildlife, from the smallest of plankton to blue whales, with more than 18 billion pounds of plastic waste flowing into oceans every year.

On this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with the co-leaders of National Geographic's "Source to Sea" plastics initiative, environmental engineer Jenna Jambeck, and marine biologist Heather Koldeway about the causes of this crisis, and steps we can take to reduce plastic pollution at home and around the world.

Monumental change is needed to reduce the impact of plastic on our planet's waterways, but Jambeck and Koldeway say small, everyday lifestyle advancements can help you do your part to reduce single use plastic waste.

Courtesy of Ann Friedman

 

 

Election analysis, friendship hacks, personal finance advice, social media gripes... And a list of Kamala Harris’ favorite snacks?

These are just a few of the topics you might hear discussed when you turn on an episode of the wildly popular podcast, “Call Your Girlfriend,” co-created and co-hosted by journalist and Dubuque-native, Ann Friedman, in the company of her long-distance best friend, Aminatou Sow.

Chris Carlson/AP

Figure skating pair Ashley Cain and Timothy LeDuc turned heads with their gold medal-winning routine at the U.S. Figure Skating Championship in Detroit earlier this year, marking their formal comeback after a terrifying fall left Cain hospitalized with a concussion, and the team's skating future in jeopardy. 

On this Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Cain and LeDuc about their comback, goals, and passions.

James Q. Lynch/The Gazette

Some of Iowa's youngest state lawmakers have made a plan to break through partisan gridlock and foster cooperation between Democrats and Republicans. On this News Buzz edition of River to River, host Emily Woodbury talks with two members of the Iowa Future Caucus, Senator Zack Wahls and Representative Joe Mitchell, about their priorities at the capitol and why they feel they are well equipped to tackle the partisan divide.

Emily Woodbury/Iowa Public Radio

While the 2020 presidential election is more than a year away, campaign season is already in full swing here in Iowa, with media coverage ramping up both locally and nationally. 

Ted Eytan/Flickr

 

On this "news buzz" edition of River to River, IPR's State Government Reporter Katarina Sostaric joins with updates from the state legislature. Then, we hear from Jesse Vroegh, the focus of a recent ruling in Polk County which determined that the state of Iowa had engaged in discrimination by forcing him to use a restoom at his workplace, the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women, that did not align with his gender identity.

Stacey MacNaught/Flickr

 

With social networks at our fingertips, it’s easy to feel like we’re more connected than ever before, but your constant scrolling, liking, and app downloading may actually decrease your quality of life.

That’s according to “Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World”, a new book by Georgetown computer scientist and author Cal Newport. In the book, Newport explores a new philosophy for technology use -- one where you focus your online time on a small number of carefully selected activities which bring you both utility and joy.

Jim Mone/AP

Two more candidates have officially announced their intention to take on President Trump in 2020, with many more dipping their toes into the candidacy waters. 

Woodleywonderworks/Flickr

 

 

The Governor has made K-12 education a priority, and Iowa lawmakers are at work crafting proposals at the Statehouse.

During this hour of River to River, hosts Ben Kieffer and Katarina Sostaric are joined by Democratic ranking member of the House Education Committee Rep. Ras Smith, and Republican chair of the Education Appropriations Subcommittee Sen. Tim Kraayenbrink. They talk about proposed changes to K-12 education base funding as brought forward by the Iowa House and Senate.

 

Wikimedia

It was the fall of 1975 when Larry Untiet started teaching in Spencer, Iowa, the same year that the Iowa High School Speech Association State Festival got its start. 

Since then, Untiet has taken Spencer High School students to the festival every single year, making Spencer the only school to boast representation at the statewide event for every year of its existence.

After 44 years of musicals, speech tournaments, and thousands of students, Untiet is retiring and leaving a notable legacy as a champion for high school performance arts.

Emily Woodbury/Iowa Public Radio

 

In 1995, at 16-years-old,  Jamie Ross was sent to prison, convicted of second degree murder. She was sentenced to 50 years, but was released after less than nine. That time spent in prison was powerful for her, and she says it turned her life around.  

 

Ross has built a life for herself in the 15 years that have passed since she was released from prison. She’s married, raising two sons, and has built a successful career that she loves. She has moved on, but she has chosen not to leave her past behind.

 

 

Harriet Tubman and Muhammad Ali are both recognized for their notable contributions to American history, but according to the cofounders of Humanize My Hoodie, and a new Black History Month clothing line released by the project,  Tubman and Ali are so much more than a textbook might show.

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