Katelyn Harrop

Talk Show Producer

Katelyn Harrop joined Iowa Public Radio as a talk show producer in 2018, where she works on IPR’s national-award winning programs River to River and Talk of Iowa.

Before heading to Iowa, Katelyn was the News Director at WRFI Community Radio in Ithaca, New York where she produced a daily news magazine program, designed and directed the station’s original morning talk show, and co-founded a hyperlocal investigative news exchange. She has also worked as a freelance reporter covering public policy and social movements for digital publications including Vice and ATTN.

Katelyn is a proud Oregonian, and when she’s not in the office you can probably find her scoping out the Midwest’s best live music acts or hiking in Iowa’s Driftless Area.

Libreshot

The summer travel season is right around the corner, and whether it's a family road trip in the region or a jetsetting destination halfway around the world, we all gather experiences and stories from our travels.

Courtesy of Elizabeth Moen

Elizabeth Moen is a favorite in Iowa. She's played venues like Racoon Motel in Davenport, the Englert Theater in Iowa City, stopped by Daytrotter last year, and even made her way onto the Hinterland lineup for this summer.

But following the release of her second EP and a tour that took her from coast to coast and over seas,  it's becoming clear that Moen's fan base streaches far beyond statelines

Omar Al Farooq Pn

Recent films like Marvel's "Black Panther" and Jordan Peele's "Us" have been praised as a huge step forward for black representation in Hollywood and pop culture. But black actors and directors have been making art in Hollywood far before these films came to the big screen. 

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John Pemble / IPR

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds established a flood recovery advisory board Monday and called on lawmakers to set aside state funding to address catastrophic flooding that hit southwest Iowa over a month ago.

“Sometimes it can take months to years for FEMA and other federal funding to be made available to Iowans impacted by the flood,” Reynolds said. “And we know that these communities and Iowans can’t afford to wait.”

Federal disaster aid for Iowa and other Midwest states is held up in the U.S. Senate as part of a larger relief package for hurricane damage in Puerto Rico.

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Two years ago, an 18-inch bronze statue known as "Goddess of the Grapes" went missing from Sioux City. Now, after a multi-year mystery, Sioux City Art Center curator Todd Behrens will head to Waterloo to recover the sculpture, which was recently returned under unusual circumstances.

Emily Woodbury/Iowa Public Radio

Everybody can get behind daily pictures of cute dogs, and 10-year-old Gideon Kidd of Cedar Falls has gone viral sharing pictures of dogs he's met on his twitter account @IvePetThatDog

Almost exactly one year ago, Gideon and his mother Rachel Braunigan launched the account, and since then Gideon has amassed more than 214,000 followers from his daily dog posting.

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It’s been a spring to remember for the feathered residents of the North and Fish Hatchery eagle nests in Decorah.

Four eaglets have hatched in total, with only three surviving. The death of one eaglet at Decorah North follows a tumultuous year at the nests, leaden with heartbreak, missing mates, new courtships and even a couple housing renovations.

Michael Weber / Shadow Fox Photography

For more than two decades, multidisciplinary artist Jason Snell has been challenging the relationship between music, maker, and technology to create richly engineered performances and complex soundscapes. 

U.S. Department of Agriculture

It’s too early for planting, but some farm fields in Iowa are already greening up thanks to cover crops. 

On this episode of Talk of Iowa, a look at cover crop use from row cropping to small scale vegetable farming with two Iowa farmers. 

Guests: 

  • Doug Adams, Humboldt-based soybean and corn farmer 
  • Carmen Black, owner of Sundog Farm and Local Harvest CSA in Solon

John Pemble/Iowa Public Radio

The Violence Against Women Act made its way through the U.S. House this week, and moves on to the Senate. The reauthorized legislation was co-sponsored by Rep. Cindy Axne, a democrat representing Iowa's 3rd Congressional District, which includes Des Moines. 

Rep. Axne joins host Ben Kieffer to discuss the act on this "news buzz" edition of River to River.

Also on the program:

Nick Youngson/Blue Diamond Gallary

Recently, President Trump put forward health care as one of the central issues of the 2020 presidential race.

On this episode of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by political scientists Donna Hoffman of the University of Northern Iowa and Jim McCormick of Iowa State University for analysis on why Congressional Republicans seem to have no appetite for the proposed Affordable Care Act overhaul. 

Other topics they cover during the show include: 

AP Photo/Pool, John Gaps III

In 2009, the Iowa Supreme Court handed down a unanimous ruling in the case of Varnum v. Brien, making Iowa the third state in the nation to legalize same-sex marriage. 

On this episode of River to River, a look back at the historic decision 10 years later. 

Guests: 

AP Photo/Julio Cortez

Bills exploring medical marijuana and the definition of an "unborn person" are up for discussion at the Iowa Statehouse. 

During this episode of River to River, we take a look at a Senate bill that could further define criminal charges for a nonconsensual termination of pregnancy and discuss a House bill that could expand the program for medical cannabis in the state. 

Pete Damiano

To many of us, the politics of today are unrecognizable compared to the politics of just a couple decades ago. On this episode of River to River, highlights from an event hosted on March 27 at the Englert Theatre in Iowa City looking at the future of U.S. politics ahead of 2020 from a variety of political and analytical perspectives. 

Meskwaki poet Ray Young Bear has been writing poetry for more than half a century, and recently had his poems and prose accepted for publication in The Iowa Review and Native Voices: Indigenous American Poetry, Craft and Conversations.

Young Bear joins this episode of Talk of Iowa to share some of his recent work, and to perform a word song written in Meskwaki. 

U.S. Geological Survey/flickr

56 Iowa counties have received a major emergency declaration due to significant flooding across the Midwest, with flood damage in the state estimated at $1.6 billion according to Governor Reynolds. How you can minimize the impact of flooding on your own home? 

Guest

  • Bill McAnally, home improvement specialist

Our founding fathers gathered in taverns to enjoy lively political conversation over a local brew, and so do we.

This episode of River to River, Pints & Politics” presented by The Gazette and Iowa Public Radio, was recorded live on Thursday, March 21 at Theatre Cedar Rapids.

The conversation was co-hosted by River to River host Ben Kieffer and Gazette investigative reporter Erin Jordan. The panel featured Gazette columnists Lynda Waddington and Adam Sullivan, along with Gazette political reporter James Lynch.

Katie Peikes/Iowa Public Radio

Gov. Kim Reynolds has issued a total of 43 countywide disaster proclamations in response to flooding that began on March 13. 

The impact has been widespread, but communities in southwestern Iowa continue to experience the heaviest impact, with many community members finding themselves displaced and assessing the damages of homes, properties, and businesses.

On this episode of River to River, we hear stories from three communities who continue to feel the effects of last week's flooding. 

This program features conversations with: 

Andrew Bardwell/Flickr

On this episode of River to River, host Ben Kieffer and guest Todd Pettys of the University of Iowa College of Law explore some of the biggest recent cases discussed in the U.S. Supreme Court term, and look ahead to some of the most anticipated cases slated for argument. 

Cases discussed include:

  • Timbs v. Indiana
  • The American Legion v. American Humanist Association
  • Gamble v. United States
  • Department of Commerce v. New York

Wikimedia Commons

 

As the country prepares to celebrate the centennial of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which set the stage for women gaining the right to vote, scholar Sally Roesch Wagner is marking the anniversary by editing  "The Women's Suffragette Movement." The anthology highlights the work of women who led the national campaign for voting rights.

Wagner joins River to River host Ben Kieffer to discuss the collection of writings and the importance of the suffrage movement today. 

Max Pixel

Mary Neubauer and her husband tried to find their way through Iowa's mental health system for years, seeking help and support for their son Sergei, who died by suicide at the age of 18 in 2017. 

"Truly a labyrinth." That's how Neubauer, now an advocate, describes mental health services in Iowa.

Justgrimes/Flickr

More than 70 thousand students would be unable to vote early on their college campuses under a wide-ranging election bill making its way through the Iowa Senate. 

On this "news buzz" edition of River to River, host Emily Woodbury speaks with University of Iowa College Republicans Chair Kyle Apple and Iowa State College Democrats President Taylor Blair to learn about student reactions to the proposed bill. 

Also on this episode:

Deanna Castings/Pexels

For 20 years, readers have been hooked on the adventures of Harry Potter and his friends, with many people finding inspiration in the characters and themes of the books by J.K. Rowling. The very popular podcast "Harry Potter and the Sacred Text" has grown out of that community, and it takes an intentional look at the series and the lessons we can take from it. 

 

The new film, “Sons and Daughters of Thunder” tells the story of the anti-slavery debates that took place at the Ohio Lane theological Seminary in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1834. These controversial meetings, lead by abolitionists, were the first to publically discuss the end of slavery in the U.S. and served as a catalyst for major social activism and change at the seminary and throughout the wider Cincinnati community. 

Wikimedia Commns

Due to deep snow, plenty of ice, wild winds, and frigid temperatures, it has been a long, hard winter for all of us in Iowa. That includes the non-human residents. 

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Wildlife Biologist Jim Pease about the possible impact of harsh winter weather on wild animals here in Iowa.

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Research cited by the FCC estimates that almost half of all calls received in 2019 will be spam, and Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller is not pleased. 

On this "news buzz" edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Deputy Attorney General Nathan Blake about the Attorney General's endorsement of a plan aimed at restricting spam calls. 

Also in the hour: 

Gage Skidmore/Flickr

Political scientists Chris Larimer of the University of Northern Iowa and Dave Andersen of Iowa State University join host Ben Kieffer for this Politics Day edition of River to River

In the hour, the trio discuss topics including:

  • U.S. Secretary of State Pompeo's visit to Iowa
  • A new probe into President Trump lead by House Democrats
  • The Senate as a possible roadblock to the president's national emergency declaration
  • Who is in and who is out in the crowded 2020 race for the presidency

Courtesy of Sam Fathallah

The music scene in Iowa and the rest of the Midwest is thriving right now and videographer Sam Fathallah wants everyone to know about it.

That's why Fathallah started Circular Sessions, a video series showcasing the breadth and depth of the Midwestern music scene through interviews and performances. Through the series, Fathallah invites artists including Elizabeth Moen, The Maytags, and Bad Bad Hats into his sun-filled artist's loft for a session that feels as creative as it is intimate. 

“Music in this type of space, in this natural lit open space... it's reminiscent of how music is made, when it's really made. You know, when it's rehearsed in people's living rooms, and in their basements before it even gets to the studio," Fathallah says. "That's what music really looks like especially in Iowa, where folks are just making music in their homes.”

John Pemble/Iowa Public Radio

 

Iowa lawmakers are looking to end the statute of limitations on cases of child sex abuse in Iowa.

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer and Iowa Public Radio Statehouse Reporter Katarina Sostaric discuss two senate bills aimed at eliminating this statute of limitations.They also explore legislation aimed at increasing access to birth control without a visit to the doctor.

 

Justin Hofman/National Geographic

 

Plastic is cheap, easy to manufacture and endlessly flexible. Over the last 70 years plastic has completely transformed the way we live. This innovation has created a global pollution crisis that threatens humans and wildlife, from the smallest of plankton to blue whales, with more than 18 billion pounds of plastic waste flowing into oceans every year.

On this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with the co-leaders of National Geographic's "Source to Sea" plastics initiative, environmental engineer Jenna Jambeck, and marine biologist Heather Koldeway about the causes of this crisis, and steps we can take to reduce plastic pollution at home and around the world.

Monumental change is needed to reduce the impact of plastic on our planet's waterways, but Jambeck and Koldeway say small, everyday lifestyle advancements can help you do your part to reduce single use plastic waste.

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