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Second House Jan. 6 hearing scheduled for the morning of June 13

The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection at the Capitol announced Monday that its second public hearing will take place on the morning of June 13.
Bill Clark
/
AP
The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection at the Capitol announced Monday that its second public hearing will take place on the morning of June 13.

The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol announced on Monday its second hearing will take place the morning of June 13.

This hearing will take place just days after the first one scheduled for Thursday, which will be in prime time at 8pm EDT. Witnesses for either hearing have not yet been announced.

About a half a dozen public hearings regarding investigations into the insurrection are planned throughout June. The committee said it will release its findings in a report in September.

At Thursday's hearing, the committee says it will "present previously unseen material" regarding Jan. 6 and will preview additional hearings to come.

Committee plans to include multimedia presentations

As committee members gear up for a month of hearings, they are also conscious of how best to capture Americans' attention to rehash the insurrection that took place well over a year ago.

California Rep. Adam Schiff, who is a member of the select committee, told NPR he was thinking of the upcoming hearings as somewhat similar to the hearings that took place when former President Trump was impeached.

"My thought is much what we tried to do in the impeachment trial... is to make it a multimedia presentation, to integrate witness testimony with video footage with documentary evidence with audio tapes to make it very engaging," Schiff told NPR.

Schiff said simplicity during the hearings is key in order to communicate what happened on Jan. 6. He said focusing on the story of Jan. 6 in chronological order is a logical way to tell the narrative.

"I think we're going to use whatever resources we can to make the presentations as compelling as possible," Schiff told NPR. "We need to get across the danger to our democracy, how close we came to losing it, how many multiple lines of effort there were to overturn the election, how close they came to succeeding."

"It's a pretty dramatic story and it has to be told in a dramatic way," he said.

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