© 2021 Iowa Public Radio
IPR20012_Website_Header_Option2_NewsNavy.png
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
IPR News

'We're Not Against It:' COVID-19 Vaccine Poses Questions For Iowa's Spanish-Speakers

12292020COVID-vaccine
Daniel Schludi
/
Unsplash
"We need to educate ourselves. And that's what I'm going to do for me. So therefore, I would expect that other members in the community would do the same thing,” Patty Ritchie said. It’s important to understand that she and most Latinos are not anti-vaccine, they just have questions.
English

The Problem

For many Latinos in Iowa, they feel they’re not getting enough information about the COVID-19 vaccine to decide whether they want to take it. Many Spanish-speakers in the state are hesitant about receiving the vaccine. While reporting this story, I asked Spanish speakers what they wanted to know about the COVID-19 vaccine. A woman in Marshalltown texted me questions:

¿Qué tan confiable es la vacuna? ¿Qué efectos secundarios tiene la vacuna? ¿Qué es su efectividad?

She asked how safe the vaccine actually is, what the side effects are and will it keep her safe from the virus. She was worried about seeming “tonta” or dumb by even asking these questions.

Patty Ritchie said this is pretty common for Spanish speakers. That kind of fear can stop someone from taking a vaccine. Ritchie is the first and only Latina on the Crawford County board of health in western Iowa—a county that is 29 percent Latino.

"We're not against it," Ritchie said. "We need to educate ourselves. And that's what I'm going to do for me. So therefore, I would expect that other members in the community would do the same thing."

She said it is important to understand that she and most other Latinos are not anti-vaccine, they just have questions. And so far, nobody has been able to answer them.

“Am I going to take it right away? No, I think I'd like some more information," Ritchie admitted. "I'm just going to be honest!”

The Kaiser Family Foundation studied reactions like Ritchie’s. It found only 26 percent of Hispanic people in the United States would take the vaccine right away. That’s compared with 40 percent of white people who said they would take the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as possible. A University of Iowa doctor knows firsthand one reason why this may be.

12292020Kaiser-COVID-Vaccine-Stats
KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor
Many more white Americans feel comfortable taking the COVID-19 vaccine than Hispanic and/or Black Americans.

Pulmonologist Rolando Sanchez specializes in the respiratory system. He works with both English-speaking patients and Spanish speakers. When COVID-19 became a larger issue in Iowa, he led question and answer sessions in Spanish about the virus. Sanchez said there are still so many theories and beliefs surrounding the COVID-19 vaccine that have not yet been dismissed by Spanish speakers.

“And believe it or not, there's a lot of people that love to listen to the theories and it's hard to know these days what is true and what is not true," Sanchez said.

Sanchez said some of the false perceptions about the vaccine include implanting microchips, unhealthy additives and infertility. He stressed none of these conspiracy theories have any merit and the vaccine is perfectly ethical.

"I can tell you over the last 30 years, nobody is more protected than a research individual. Because there is such a huge paranoia now that if you make a tiny mistake, your laboratory might be shut down forever," Sanchez explained. "Nobody is going to even dare to write a protocol that is jeopardizing somebody's health."

Sanchez said both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine, both authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, work like a security system for the body. The vaccine tells the body what to look out for and how to fight it.

"What we're doing is we're exposing that ID to our immune systems. When the real virus tries to infect your body, because your immune system already knows it, is going to react and block the infection. But there is no manipulation of our genes," Sanchez said.

What's Being Done

The Iowa Commission of Latino Affairs is currently working on helping Latinos understand what’s true and what’s not. Chair Caleb Knutson is creating a public service announcement specifically for Latinos.

"I've been talking to different friends, colleagues throughout the state. And I was surprised how many pillars in our community and the Latino community in Iowa are unsure of the vaccine,” Knutson said.

Knutson participated in a trial for the Pfizer vaccine. He had hoped to be “unblinded”—so he would have known if he had the vaccine or a placebo. That way, he would have been a stronger voice for the outreach project.

Unfortunately, he said the University of Iowa, which ran the trial, will not let him know as of the moment. The trial leaders told him they appreciate his work, and they will reach out to other Latinos within the healthcare system to help with his vaccine outreach.

“If people in my circle group are unsure of this, then there's gonna be a lot of others. And I just want to ensure that our community doesn't fall further behind because of the pandemic," Knutson said.

12292020Zoom-Caleb-and-Jovelyn
Kassidy Arena
Caleb Knutson, top left, and Jovelyn Castellanos, bottom, spoke with me over Zoom Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2020 about the public service announcement Knutson is working on. He and Castellanos met over the video conferencing app earlier in the week. The two met at a Latino leadership conference.

But he said in Iowa, there are not many resources for him to turn to for help. That’s why he reached out to Jovelyn Castellanos, a program coordinator for Parkland Hospital in Dallas, Texas. She works in outreach and community relations. Her outreach projects have worked in her area. She said more Latinos are getting vaccinated there.

“The health systems are just so complex that health navigation is so difficult and can be so overwhelming sometimes," Castellanos said.

That’s why Knutson wants to make it easier for Iowa’s Latinos to understand the vaccine. But he said it will not be easy.

“After hearing all their successes in Texas, that, you know, after having a conversation with Jovelyn, I feel like we can't operate at that scale, but we can make a dent," Knuston said.

Castellanos recommended Knutson use easy-to-read infographics and community-organized outreach to help educate Latinos, Spanish-speakers and others about the COVID-19 vaccine.

History Behind The Problem

Although the Iowa law was intended to be voluntary, there were undoubtedly instances when patients felt they had little choice.
Amy Vogel, "Regulating Degeneracy: Eugenic Sterilization in Iowa, 1911-1977"

There’s a long history of Latinos being a little distrustful of the health field. As recent as the 1970s and 80s, Spanish-speaking women in the U.S. were victims of a medical program which sterilized them without their knowledge. This type of eugenics program happened in Iowa, too. More than 2,000 individuals were sterilized under the cover of the program.

Lina-Maria Murillo studies and teaches that at the University of Iowa. Murillo said this problematic history has caused a catastrophic rift between Spanish-speakers and health professionals.

“Those are the legacies that become mythologized for people," Murillo explained. "They may not themselves quite understand why they don't trust the thing. But they know that they shouldn't trust the thing.”

Murillo explained how this sort of history stays within a community. And when the stories are negative or even pose dangerous situations, that will affect how people in current day act which, she said, they are completely within reason to do.

"The way that you're treated in that moment leaves this sort of lasting impression, that then becomes something that can get passed on, like a mother talking to her daughter," Murillo said.

That's why Murillo isn't necessarily surprised to hear many Latinos, especially those who only speak Spanish, are hesitant about taking the vaccine. Murillo said this is even more likely if they are the first or second generation to live in the United States. The past is riddled with people of color and immigrants being abused or manipulated by health professionals.

"The assumptions that doctors and nurses and other people have about people of color and what they know and what they don't know, and how they should be taught," Murillo listed. "All of that breeds distrust."

To fight that mistrust, community relations expert Castellanos said vaccine outreach should be treated like voter outreach. State leadership must meet Latinos where they are, to help instill confidence and understanding.

“To make good health decisions, people have to understand the information, process the information in a culturally and linguistically manner, in order to make effective decisions for themselves and also for their families,” Castellanos said.

The Iowa Commission of Latino Affairs is currently working with Rolando Sanchez, M.D. to arrange a possible bilingual question and answer session about the vaccine.

Knutson is in the middle of planning the outreach initiative, but until then, Sanchez along with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises if the vaccine is available, take it.

En Español

La traducción de Hola Iowa.

El problema

Muchos latinos en Iowa sienten que no están recibiendo suficiente información sobre la vacuna COVID-19 para decidir si desean tomarla. Muchos hispanohablantes del estado dudan de recibir la vacuna. Mientras escribía esta historia, pregunté a los hispanohablantes qué querían saber sobre la vacuna COVID-19. Una mujer en Marshalltown me envió un mensaje de texto con preguntas:

¿Qué tan confiable es la vacuna? ¿Qué efectos secundarios tiene la vacuna? ¿Qué es su efectividad?

Preguntó cuán segura es la vacuna, cuáles son los efectos secundarios y si la mantendrá a salvo del virus. Le preocupaba parecer “tonta” incluso haciendo estas preguntas.

Patty Ritchie dijo que esto es bastante común para los hispanohablantes. Ese tipo de miedo puede impedir que alguien se vacune. Ritchie es la primera y única latina en la junta de salud del condado de Crawford en el oeste de Iowa, un condado que es 29 por ciento latino.

“No estamos en contra (de tomar la vacuna)”, dijo Ritchie. “Necesitamos informarnos. Y eso es lo que yo voy a hacer por mí. Así que, por lo tanto, esperaría que otros miembros de la comunidad hicieran lo mismo”.

Dijo que es importante entender que ella y la mayoría de los otros latinos no son anti-vacunas, sólo tienen interrogantes. Y hasta ahora, nadie ha sido capaz de responderlas.

“¿Voy a tomarla de inmediato? No, creo que me gustaría tener más información”, admitió Ritchie. “¡Sólo voy a ser sincera!”

La Fundación de la Familia Kaiser estudió reacciones como la de Ritchie. Encontró que sólo el 26% de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos se vacunarían de inmediato. Eso se compara con el 40% de los blancos que dijeron que se pondrían la vacuna COVID-19 lo antes posible. Un médico de la Universidad de Iowa sabe de primera mano una razón por la que esto puede ser así.

12292020Kaiser-COVID-Vaccine-Stats
KFF COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor
Many more white Americans feel comfortable taking the COVID-19 vaccine than Hispanic and/or Black Americans.

El neumólogo Rolando Sánchez se especializa en el sistema respiratorio. Trabaja tanto con pacientes de habla inglesa como con los de habla española. Cuando COVID-19 se convirtió en un tema más importante en Iowa, dirigió sesiones de preguntas y respuestas en español sobre el virus. Sánchez dijo que todavía hay muchas teorías y creencias en torno a la vacuna COVID-19 que no han sido descartadas por los hispanohablantes.

“Y créanlo o no, hay mucha gente a la que le encanta escuchar las teorías y es difícil saber hoy en día lo que es verdad y lo que no es verdad”, dijo Sánchez.

Sánchez dijo que algunas de las ideas falsas sobre la vacuna incluyen la implantación de microchips, aditivos nocivos y la infertilidad. Enfatizó que ninguna de estas teorías conspirativas tiene algún fundamento y que la vacuna es perfectamente ética.

“Puedo decirte que en los últimos 30 años, nadie está más protegido que un sujeto de investigación. Porque hay una paranoia tan grande ahora que si cometes un pequeño error, tu laboratorio podría cerrarse para siempre”, explicó Sánchez. “Nadie se atreverá a escribir un protocolo que ponga en peligro la salud de alguien”.

Sánchez dijo que tanto la vacuna Pfizer como la Moderna, ambas autorizadas por la Administración de Alimentos y Medicamentos de EE.UU., funcionan como un sistema de seguridad para el cuerpo. La vacuna le dice al cuerpo qué debe cuidar y cómo combatirlo.

“Lo que estamos haciendo es exponer esa identificación a nuestro sistema inmunológico. Cuando el verdadero virus trata de infectar tu cuerpo, porque tu sistema inmunológico ya lo sabe, va a reaccionar y bloquear la infección. Pero no hay manipulación de nuestros genes”, dijo Sánchez.

¿Qué se está haciendo?
La Comisión de Asuntos Latinos de Iowa está trabajando actualmente en ayudar a los latinos a entender qué es verdad y qué no. El director Caleb Knutson está creando un anuncio de servicio público específicamente para los latinos.

“He estado hablando con diferentes amigos, colegas de todo el estado. Y me sorprendió la cantidad de miembros de nuestra comunidad y de la comunidad latina de Iowa que no están seguros de la vacuna”, dijo Knutson.

Knutson participó en una prueba a ciegas para la vacuna de Pfizer. Esperaba haber sabido si me dieron la vacuna o un placebo. De esa manera, habría sido una voz más fuerte para el proyecto de divulgación.

Desafortunadamente, dijo que la Universidad de Iowa, que llevó a cabo la prueba, no le dejará saber por el momento. Los líderes de la prueba le dijeron que aprecian su trabajo y que se acercarán a otros latinos dentro del sistema de salud para ayudar con su proyecto de crear conciencia sobre la vacunación.

“Si la gente en mi grupo de círculo no está segura de esto, entonces habrá muchos otros. Y sólo quiero asegurarme de que nuestra comunidad no se quede rezagada a causa de la pandemia”, dijo Knutson.

12292020Zoom-Caleb-and-Jovelyn
Kassidy Arena
Caleb Knutson, top left, and Jovelyn Castellanos, bottom, spoke with me over Zoom Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2020 about the public service announcement Knutson is working on. He and Castellanos met over the video conferencing app earlier in the week. The two met at a Latino leadership conference.

Pero dijo que en Iowa, no hay muchos recursos a los que pueda acudir en busca de ayuda. Por eso se puso en contacto con Jovelyn Castellanos, un coordinador de programas del Hospital Parkland en Dallas, Texas. Ella trabaja en difusión y relaciones comunitarias. Sus proyectos de alcance comunitario han funcionado en su área. Dijo que más latinos se están vacunando allí.

“Los sistemas de salud son tan complejos que la orientación de la salud es tan difícil y puede ser tan abrumadora a veces”, dijo Castellanos.

Por eso Knutson quiere facilitar a los latinos de Iowa la comprensión de la vacuna. Pero dijo que no será fácil.

“Después de escuchar todos sus logros en Texas, que, ya sabes, después de tener una conversación con Jovelyn, siento que no podemos operar a esa escala, pero podemos lograr una brecha”, dijo Knuston.

Castellanos recomendó a Knutson que usara infografías fáciles de leer y una divulgación organizada por la comunidad para ayudar a informar a los latinos, hispanohablantes y otros sobre la vacuna COVID-19.

La historia detrás del problema

Although the Iowa law was intended to be voluntary, there were undoubtedly instances when patients felt they had little choice.
Amy Vogel, "Regulating Degeneracy: Eugenic Sterilization in Iowa, 1911-1977"

Hay una larga historia de latinos que desconfían un poco del campo de la salud. Tan recientemente como en los años 70 y 80, las mujeres de habla hispana en los EE.UU. fueron víctimas de un programa médico que las esterilizó sin su conocimiento. Este tipo de programa de eugenesia también ocurrió en Iowa. Más de 2,000 individuos fueron esterilizados bajo el amparo del programa.

Lina-Maria Murillo estudia y enseña eso en la Universidad de Iowa. Murillo dijo que esta historia problemática ha causado una ruptura catastrófica entre los hispanohablantes y los profesionales de la salud.

“Esos son los legados que se convierten en mitos para la gente”, explicó Murillo. “Puede que ellos mismos no entiendan por qué no confían en la cuestión. Pero saben que no deberían confiar en ella.”

Murillo explicó cómo este tipo de historia se mantiene dentro de una comunidad. Y cuando las historias son negativas o incluso plantean situaciones peligrosas, eso afectará a la forma en que la gente actúa en la actualidad, lo cual, dijo, está completamente dentro de lo razonable.

“La forma en que te tratan en ese momento deja este tipo de impresión duradera, que luego se convierte en algo que se puede transmitir, como una madre que le habla a su hija”, dijo Murillo.

Es por eso que Murillo no necesariamente se sorprende al escuchar que muchos latinos, especialmente aquellos que sólo hablan español, dudan en tomar la vacuna. Murillo dijo que esto es aún más probable si son la primera o segunda generación que vive en los Estados Unidos. El pasado está lleno de gente de color y de inmigrantes que fueron abusados o manipulados por los profesionales de la salud.

“Las suposiciones que los médicos y enfermeras y otras personas tienen sobre la gente de color y lo que saben y lo que no saben, y cómo se les debe enseñar”, enumeró Murillo. “Todo eso genera desconfianza.”

Para combatir esa desconfianza, la experta en relaciones comunitarias Castellanos dijo que el fomento de las vacunas debe ser tratado como el programa de difusión de los votantes. Los líderes del estado deben reunirse con los latinos donde estén, para ayudar a infundirles confianza y comprensión.

“Para tomar buenas decisiones de salud, la gente tiene que entender la información, procesarla de manera cultural y lingüística, para poder tomar decisiones efectivas para ellos mismos y también para sus familias”, dijo Castellanos.

La Comisión de Asuntos Latinos de Iowa está trabajando actualmente con el Dr. Rolando Sánchez para organizar una probable sesión bilingüe de preguntas y respuestas sobre la vacuna.

Knutson se encuentra en medio de la planificación de la iniciativa de divulgación, pero hasta entonces, Sánchez junto con los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades de EE.UU. aconseja que si la vacuna está disponible, la tome.