© 2022 Iowa Public Radio
IPR20012_Website_Header_Option2_NewsNavy.png
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Political News

Marjorie Taylor Greene, QAnon Endorser, Wins House Seat In Georgia

Marjorie Taylor Greene (right) poses with a supporter in Rome, Ga., late Tuesday. Greene, criticized for promoting bigoted videos and supporting the far-right QAnon conspiracy theory, won the GOP nomination for Georgia's 14th Congressional District.
Marjorie Taylor Greene (right) poses with a supporter in Rome, Ga., late Tuesday. Greene, criticized for promoting bigoted videos and supporting the far-right QAnon conspiracy theory, won the GOP nomination for Georgia's 14th Congressional District.

Her victory had been expected ever since Greene won her party’s nomination; the district is heavily Republican, and her long-shot Democratic rival dropped out of the race in September. He still won 21% of the vote, according to The Associated Press.

Marjorie Taylor Greene, a controversial Republican who has expressed support for the baseless QAnon conspiracy theory, has won her campaign in Georgia’s 14th Congressional District.

Her victory had been expected ever since Greene won her party’s nomination; the district is heavily Republican, and her long-shot Democratic rival dropped out of the race in September. He still won 21% of the vote, according to The Associated Press.

The QAnon conspiracy theory that Greene once embraced posits that a mysterious figure named “Q” is dropping crumbs of information to reveal a vast conspiracy, perpetually on the cusp of being brought down in dramatic fashion. The details of the conspiracy vary widely but often include bizarre, unfounded accusations of satanic activity and child trafficking. The conspiracy theory has been linked to multiple incidents of violence.

In 2017, Greene posted a video in which she called Q a “patriot” and said Trump’s presidency offered a “once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to take this global cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles out.” She also spread other conspiracy theories on a blog and expressed anti-Muslim sentiment, including stating that “anyone that is a Muslim, that believes in sharia law, does not belong in our government.”

Greene has since distanced herself from her pro-QAnon statements, saying she has shifted her position over time. “This wasn’t part of my campaign,” Greene told Fox News. “It hasn’t been anything I’ve talked about for quite a long time now.”

Some high-profile Republicans initially denounced Greene’s statements, but she was embraced by Trump and a number of other powerful figures within the Republican Party. Next year she will be heading to Congress. As NPR’s Sue Davis has noted, her election and the president’s vocal support for her reflect a shift within the GOP where once-fringe beliefs are now rising in prominence within the corridors of power.