Music News

Bao Ngo, High Road Touring; Olivia Bee, SubPop Records; Matador Records; Kevin Burt / Graphic: Katelyn Harrop


Casey Reyner

Our Iowa City studio recently got a major face lift. We painted some grey-brown walls robin’s egg blue, got rid of some office furniture that hadn’t been used in years and set up lobby space that reminds us of our living rooms at home. 

As a statewide network, we have studios across Iowa. Talk of Iowa and River to River’s production team is based in Iowa City, and for two hours a day on weekdays, the producers and hosts who work on those shows foster conversation that inspires and educates Iowans.

John Rommereim

In a dusty box in the archives of Grinnell College, John Rommereim found a long-missing manuscript.  It was the only copy of a massive score by Edward Scheve, the composer who "made Grinnell musical."  Scheve conducted it in a 1910 performance with the Berlin Philharmonic, but all that survived was a piano reduction - or so things appeared until Rommereim opened that box.  Below, he explains how his discovery set in motion an enthusiastic response thousands of miles away.  He also discusses Scheve's rel

IPR/Sydney Hauer

It's been an exciting year for the Cedar Falls band Hex Girls: not only did they release their debut album More Of That, they performed at the IPR Live Sessions stage at the 80/35 festival, followed by a two-week tour, and have a music video coming soon. We talked about all of this and more (including the history of the band's name, and exactly how they befriended guitarist Charlie Patterson) during Hex Girls' Studio One live session.

Nick Spanos

Tank and the Bangas, an American funk and soul music group from New Orleans won 2017’s Tiny Desk Contest by unanimous vote, wowing NPR’s music desk with their unique spoken word inspired style. During this Talk of Iowa conversation, Tarriona "Tank" Ball,  who is  lead vocalist for the band, talks with host Charity Nebbe. 

Tank and her band are headlining a Halloween show on Tuesday, October 30 at Codfish Hollow in Maquoketa. 

Dead Man's Bones/Rhianon England

Welcome to Buried Treasures, a new series at The B-Side where we dig back and listen to some older songs that we heard on Studio One in years past. Please send your suggestions for Buried Treasures to studioone@iowapublicradio.org.

Geffen Records

Welcome to Buried Treasures, a new series at The B-Side where we dig back and listen to some older songs that we heard on Studio One in years past. Please send your suggestions for Buried Treasures to studioone@iowapublicradio.org.

facebook.com/theeohsees

The 21st Oh Sees album is not a breakup record.  Well, maybe it is if headbanging riffs and mythological sci-fi lyrics provide the catharsis for a broken relationship.  The album title Smote Reverser and the cover art tell you this is a project inspired by heavy metal.  The music (with those mythological sci-fi lyrics) is metal-leaning prog rock.  The San Francisco-based Oh Sees began in 1997 as a vehicle for the music of John Dwyer, and Dwyer has been experimenting with different varieties of psychedelic and garage rock ever since.  There have been band lineup changes and

Jamie Bernstein can't call her childhood a typical one. On any given weekend, she might find Lauren Bacall, Isaac Stern, Richard Avedon, Mike Nichols, Stephen Sondheim, Lillian Hellman or Sidney Lumet hanging out at her house. Jamie's father was Leonard Bernstein.

Aug. 25, 2018 marks the centennial of Leonard Bernstein's birth. He was a singular American talent and one of the great orchestra conductors of his generation. He was also a composer of symphonies, ballets and hit musicals, a teacher, a television personality and a complicated man with a complicated personal life.

IPR/Madeleine King

As summer winds down and school rolls back into session, we’ve been looking back on the music that made our summer. From festivals around the state to live sets straight from our studios in Cedar Falls, we’ve been busy bringing our listeners “music that matters”. Check out some highlights from Studio One’s summer schedule and look ahead with us at what’s to come in the next few months as well.

JUNE

Studio One Underground with “whiskey gospel” group, King of the Tramps

facebook.com/snailmailband

Lindsey Jordan turned nineteen in June, shortly after the release of her buzzworthy debut full-length album as Snail Mail.  The album is Lush, the follow up to the Snail Mail EP Jordan had released on a small local label when she was sixteen.

facebook.com/dirtyprojectors

Dirty Projectors are David Longstreth's band.  Where his life goes, so goes the band.  The 2017 album Dirty Projectors was a breakup record, with Longstreth writing about the end of his relationship with band member Amber Collins.  Now, a year later, things are looking decidedly more upbeat with  Lamp Lit Prose.  It's the eighth studio album from the Brooklyn-based Dirty Projectors.  The group rises above the indie rock (and indie pop) pack, with Longstreth's distinctive songwriting and vocal style, and those dazzling electronic bleats and blurps that we love from this ban

facebook.com/jimjamesmusic

Jim James is the frontman of the band My Morning Jacket, plus he's been involved in interesting collaborations like Monsters Of Folk and The New Basement Tapes.  As a solo artist, he's been releasing EPs and studio albums since 2009.  James is best known as a songwriter, vocalist and guitarist, but he's a multi-instrumentalist and producer as well.  He plays a lot of guitar on his new album, Uniform Distortion.  Like many artists these days, Jim James is finding inspiration in the current cultural climate, as he explains:  "I feel like there is this blanket distortion on society/me

FACEBOOK.COM/ROLLINGBLACKOUTSCOASTALFEVER

Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever are an up-and-coming band from Melbourne, Australia.  They formed in 2013 and released a couple of EPs leading up to their debut full-length album, Hope Downs.  The record is named after a vast open cut mine in the middle of Australia.  Guitar-centric indie rock is alive and well in the land down under (Courtney Barnett!), and Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever like to play theirs in the wide open spaces.  According to Fran Keaney, one of the band's three songwriter/guitarist/vocalists:  "We didn't really want to record in a studio.  We thought we'd get

KWWL

The music festival scene in Iowa gets bigger and better every year! It's an exciting time for live music fans in our state, but it can also get a little overwhelming if you're trying to make plans for the summer. We're here to help with our list of festivals happening in Iowa.

“I shouldn’t tell you this, but she advocates dirty books… Chaucer… Rabelais... BALZAC!” It’s a laugh line that never falls flat, and it advances the plot of The Music Man. Broadway convention meant that Harold Hill and Marian Paroo must end up together, so Meredith Willson needed another dramatic tension, and he found it in priggish opposition to the library. And what bluenoses could be more hilarious - or more believable - than the mayor's wife and her cronies?

  

Casey Reyner

Audiophiles and live music enthusiasts of Iowa, UNITE! This is your season. Summertime is for craft beer, silly love songs, and dancing around barefoot at concerts. Am I right?!

You have been hearing our Studio One hosts Mark Simmet and Tony Dehner talk about which songs they're listening to on River to River lately. We also want to direct you to awesome live music happening this month around the state. Behold: The June Music Listical! 

Friday, June 8 --- Real Estate at Codfish Hollow

IPR/Tony Dehner

The Des Moines hip-hop artist is having a busy year. His new EP Riot Gear was released earlier this year, and his label Media Fresh will be releasing music by additional artists this summer. We talked about all of this, and more, and heard some great music during a live performance on IPR's Studio One Tracks!

Roger D. Feldhans

We're getting ready to wrap up our Studio One Underground series for the first half of 2018, as we'll be welcoming King Of The Tramps to the show on Thursday, June 7th at 7 pm! Based in Auburn, King Of The Tramps travel regularly across the state playing what they call "whiskey gospel" - a blend of country, soul, blues and rock n' roll that has broad appeal among fans of all kinds of music.

Black Violin / Wikimedia Commons

The genre bending classical hip-hop duo Black Violin is playing a show at the Gallagher Bluedorn Performing Arts Center in Cedar Falls on Wednesday, May 2. During this Talk of Iowa interview, Wil Baptiste, who plays viola for the duo, joins Charity Nebbe. 

Beth Bombara

We're bringing in another great singer-songwriter from Missouri to Studio One Underground! Beth Bombara will be joining us for our live broadcast from the Des Moines Social Club on May 3rd!

The St. Louis-based Bombara has toured nationally and opened for Pokey LaFarge, Waxahatchee and Madisen Ward & The Mama Bear, and is developing a following in the Des Moines area. She cites George Harrison, Tom Petty, Neko Case and Aimee Mann as influences on her folk-rock sound.

Wikipedia Creative Commons

She doesn't mind talking about barriers to women in the field of conducting - I'm glad I asked! But her achievement has made the term "woman conductor" obsolete.

Izabel Crane

We'll be expanding our borders a bit on IPR's Studio One Underground in the coming months, as we'll be welcoming some great musicians from Missouri in April and May! First up, from the Ozarks, it's Izabel Crane!

treesreach

IPR is always looking for new ways to bring great music to our listeners, and more and more, that means going beyond what we do on air. It's no surprise to anyone that social media is playing a growing role in reaching our listeners. With this in mind, we've invested in video equipment that will make it possible for us to regularly stream our in-studio performances. We've already done it on our Classical stream, and this week you'll have two chances to catch Studio One events on Facebook Live!

When pianist/ composer Nathan Carterette plays the Goldberg Variations in our Cedar Falls studio on Tuesday, March 13th, you can listen on-air, or stream the video at our Facebook page. Carterette has performed the Goldbergs live on radio before (using Mr. Rogers' old piano at Pittsburgh's WQED), but this is the first time you can watch if you choose.

IPR/Chris Fenton

The Host Country are a band that's definitely evolved over the years. Originally a folk-inspired duo, they added a rhythm section for their first full-length album, and expanded to a five-piece band with two electric guitars in the past year. The Host Country brought their bigger, more rockin' sound to Studio One Underground in March, and now you can hear their performance right here.

If you listen to my daily program, you might notice that I can't resist English pastoral music. You might not guess that I once thought of it as an indulgence, a guilty pleasure like gooey brownies or, more to the point, sticky toffee pudding. I learned early on to equate "greatness" in music with Germanic thoroughness and "significance" with cutting-edge spikiness. Musicology back then wrote off the English pastoral style as "a reactionary mishmash of escapism, sentimentality and nostalgia—a refuge for dead-enders and also-rans."

John Pemble

Many symphony orchestras are branching out in an effort to attract new music fans. Even if someone has never been to a orchestra concert before, they might want to go to Harry Potter Night at the Des Moines Symphony or enjoy an evening of “A Night of Symphonic Rock” as interpreted by Orchestra Iowa.

“I think it’s wonderful,” says Des Moines Symphony music director Joseph Giunta. “I think it’s a great way to expand audiences, and I think it’s a great way to stay in touch with your community.”

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