Latinos

On this 'Newsbuzz' edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer gets a look at the guidelines just released by state education officials for school reopenings, followed by a conversation with an infectious disease specialist about the spread of the novel coronavirus and how the public can continue to protect themselves and slow the spread of COVID-19.

Eight commissioners pose for a picture in front of a blue bike sculpture.
Caleb Knutson / Iowa Commission of Latino Affairs

The Iowa Commission of Latino Affairs has started a collaboration with Hola Iowa, a bilingual news outlet focused on Latino communities in Iowa and western Illinois. They loosely named the project “Latinos You Should Know.” The entire issue of the Hola Iowa publication will be devoted to highlighting the work of 20 Latinos of 2020.

A small rainbow flag is raised above heads. The people are facing away from the camera.
Mark Boss / Unsplash

A buzzword in today’s society is intersectionality. It describes how one person is made up of multiple identities. It includes things like race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and gender, among other things. All of those aspects make up a person.

In a crowd of protesters, one arm reaches above them all with a phone taking a picture of police in the background.
Natalie Krebs / Iowa Public Radio

The Black Lives Matter movement has seen greater involvement in protests across the country. Its members often ask the white population to “use their privilege” to speak out about the injustice and unfair treatment of black communities.

 

But Latinos in Iowa do not exactly fit into the white privileged group, and the majority are not members of the black community. But they still have a place in civil justice movements.

Hush Naidoo / Unsplash

Dr. Stanley Perlman has studied corona viruses for more than 40 years. Now, his research is part of the global race to better understand COVID-19.

Katie Peikes / IPR

Three Democratic presidential candidates courted Latino voters during a town hall Thursday in Des Moines, while a fourth spoke via prerecorded video.

Elias Castillo / Unsplash

In this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer examines the historical roots of Latinos living in the heart of the country. Kieffer is joined by Rene Rocha, professor of political science at the University of Iowa,  to discuss migration and the Abolish ICE movement. 

cordeauphotos / creative commons

Two weeks after a mass shooting shook the nation, members of Iowa's Latino community share their reactions to the hate-fueled violence.

The shooter, who killed 22 people in El Paso on August 3rd, told police he was specifically targeting Mexicans. Now, Latino Iowans are questioning their own safety.

Courtesy of Gloria Martinez

The Iowa State Fair opened last Thursday and hundreds of thousands of visitors have already passed through the gates to see what this year's fair has to offer. 

For this special Iowa State Fair hour of Talk of Iowa, our host Charity Nebbe visited the fairgrounds the day before it opened. She talks to the fierce competitors of the popular jams, jellies and fruit butter competitions, then introduces a mother-son baking duo who have been competing in the baking contests for the last four years.

Braceros in the U.S.

May 23, 2018
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode (cropping and contrast changes made)
Oregon State University Archives

Between 1942 and 1966, the Bracero Program brought 4.6 million Mexican migrant workers to the United States including to jobs in Iowa. They were working largely in agricultural jobs.

Brian Behnken is an associate professor of history and the U.S. Latino studies program at Iowa State University. He explains the history of the program, how it was implemented, and what was required of workers and employers.

The program began during World War Two.

callesur.com

He is from Panama and she is from Columbia, they met in Iowa, and they are musical partners that make up the duo Calle Sur. In this Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Karin Stein and Ed East. Stein grew up in a rural area of Columbia, and East lived in the busiest corridor of the cosmopolitan Panama City.

They talk about their musical influences, experiences growing up, coming to the U.S., and being Latino and Hispanic in Iowa.

Calle Sur is performing in Grinnell on April 5.

Flickr / Memphis CVB

Currently 50,000 Latinos in Iowa are registered to vote, according to Iowa’s League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC).

The organization is intensifying voter outreach in Iowa, as it wants to increase Latino registration by as many as 10,000 people. LULAC is attending all Latino festivals in Iowa, including one this weekend in Des Moines.  It's also holding community events this month and in early October. 

Monica Reyes, founder, Dream Iowa

A Latino advocacy group is working hard to get voters out to their precinct caucuses on February 1st.  

They have ambitious goals for how many Latinos will participate.  An immigration expert says their targets are realistic.  

Close to a hundred Latinos gathered on a recent Sunday at Grandview University in Des Moines.   Part of the agenda was to learn how the Iowa caucuses work.    

Christian Ucles walks them through a typical Democratic caucus, where supporters of a certain candidate gather together in a group in a corner of the room.     

Iowa Public Radio / Sarah Boden

Trustees from the U.S. Conference of Mayors were in Des Moines Monday afternoon, ahead of the Brown and Black Presidential Forum at Drake University. The annual forum is geared towards African-American and Latino voters, and the mayors were discussing salient issues in urban and minority communities. 

United Nations Photo / Flickr

Reports say that the White House plans to start a push towards comprehensive immigration reform this month. Ben Kieffer speaks with immigrants who have come to our state about the challenges they faced moving to Iowa from another country - finding work, a new life, putting down new roots in Iowa's communities, and the Immigrant Voices Project.

Latinos in Iowa

Oct 9, 2012
Latino mural in Chicago, IL
Richie Diesterheft / Flickr

The Latino Midwest examines the history, education, literature, art, and politics of Latinos in the Midwest in light of the demographic changes experienced by states in this region with growing Latino populations. It aims to explore the changing demographics and dynamics of Latino communities in Iowa, and to strengthen the responsiveness of policy makers, business leaders, and community organizations.