2020 Election

Screenshot / Iowa PBS

The four Democrats running to face Republican U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst debated for the first time Monday night. The November race is looking to be both competitive and expensive. Sen. Ernst hopes to get a second term representing Iowa, and Democrats see the seat as a possible pickup in November as they try to take the majority in the Senate.

Iowa PBS hosted an Iowa Press debate for the U.S. Senate Democratic Primary on Monday, May 18 at Iowa PBS studios in Johnston. Watch the recording of the hour-long debate here.

Campaign Facebook pages

Iowa has a primary election on June 2, and Iowa Public Radio is featuring profiles of the Democrats who are running to take on Republican U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst in November.

This week, IPR has featured profiles of the four Democrats running. UNI Political Science Professor Chris Larimer says the winner of the race will have to run a very expensive campaign and the race is looking more competitive than it had earlier this year.

John Pemble / IPR file

Iowa has a primary election on June 2, and Iowa Public Radio is featuring profiles of the Democrats who are running to take on Republican U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst in November.

Real Estate Executive Theresa Greenfield is one of the four candidates seeking her party’s nomination. Greenfield ran in Iowa’s 3rd Congressional District race in 2018 but dropped out after she found out that one of her campaign staffers falsified signatures on her nominating petition.

John Pemble / IPR File

Iowa has a primary election on June 2, and Iowa Public Radio is featuring profiles of the Democrats who are running to take on Republican U.S. Senator Joni Ernst in November.

Eddie Mauro is a businessman and former coach and teacher who lives in Des Moines. Mauro ran unsuccessfully in Iowa’s 3rd Congressional District race in 2018 but lost to now-Congresswoman Cindy Axne.

Kimberly Graham's campaign facebook page

 

Iowa has a primary election on June 2, and Iowa Public Radio is featuring profiles of the Democrats who are running to take on Republican U.S. Senator Joni Ernst in November.

Kimberly Graham is an attorney for kids of participants in Family Treatment Court. This is the first time she's run for office. 

 

Natalie Krebs / Iowa Public Radio

A primary election on June 2 will determine who runs against Republican Sen. Joni Ernst for one of Iowa's U.S. Senate seats. There are also primaries in each of Iowa's four congressional districts, as well as in many state legislative districts.

 

Due to concerns about COVID-19, Secretary of State Paul Pate has made adjustments to this year’s voting process. 

 

 

In what have turned out to be the last presidential primary elections in the month of March because of the novel coronavirus, Joe Biden swept all three states Tuesday by big margins and appears well on his way to being the Democratic nominee.

The former vice president won Florida by almost 40 points, Illinois by more than 20 and Arizona by double-digits, too.

It was a remarkable night that adds to Biden's delegate lead that, at this point and because of how Democrats allocate their delegates, looks insurmountable.

Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

Only two candidates will be onstage for Sunday's Democratic primary debate: former Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. The CNN-Univision debate was relocated from Arizona to Washington, D.C., and will not have an in-person audience due to coronavirus concerns. CNN is streaming the debate on their website, as well as on the network's mobile app and TV streaming services. Follow live coverage of the debate, with real-time analysis from NPR reporters. 

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, the 11th Democratic presidential debate, on Sunday, is set to look and sound quite different from the previous 10.

To prevent further transmission of the virus, the Democratic National Committee announced Thursday it will hold the debate in Washington, D.C., with no live audience, instead of its original planned location of Arizona, one of four states voting on Tuesday.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

On this episode of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by political scientists Wayne Moyer of Grinnell College and Megan Goldberg of Cornell College, for analysis of the latest primary results and the state of the contest between Biden and Sanders.

Listeners voice their reasons for supporting certain candidates, and they discuss how COVID-19 is posing political challenges across the world.   

Guest: 

CAROLINE AMENABAR / NPR

In the second biggest Democratic primary night next to Super Tuesday, March 10 has six contests. Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota and Washington state are choosing Democratic presidential nominees.

Follow NPR's live coverage, including results and analysis.

Stephen Cummings / Flickr

Iowa’s state parties will hold their county conventions later this month. The events come at a time when most Democratic caucusgoers’ preferred candidates have already dropped out.

Phil Roeder / Flickr

On this episode of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by political scientists Steffen Schmidt of Iowa State University and Donna Hoffman of  the University of Northern Iowa, for a look at what the results from Super Tuesday mean for the rest of the primary season. 

Tom Sparks/Flickr creative commons / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

The chair of the Nevada Democratic Party is calling for that state to consider ending its caucuses. The statement comes as there is increased scrutiny of the Democratic nominating process. Iowa and Nevada are not the only states with caucuses, but they are the most high profile, with Iowa's first-in-the-nation contest, and Nevada coming third in the overall nominating calendar. If Nevada were to move to a primary, it could put even more pressure on the Hawkeye State.

Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

Democratic presidential hopefuls are on stage in South Carolina ahead of that state’s primary. The candidates’ battle follows Sen. Bernie Sanders’ wins in the New Hampshire primary and the Nevada caucuses. The debate starts at 7 p.m. CT, and is available for streaming online through the CBSN app. 

John Locher / AP Photo

Follow NPR's live coverage of the 2020 Nevada caucuses, including results and analysis.

Mary Altaffer / AP Photo

On this Politics Day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with political scientists Jim McCormick and Jonathan Hassid, of Iowa State University about President Trump's unhappiness with William Barr after the Attorney General said Trump's tweeting was making it "impossible for him to do his job."

They also discuss Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg, who has spent more than $400 million on his 2020 campaign so far, and what that means for elections of the future. And Ben has his guests reflect on COVID-19's impact on the Chinese economy and the state of Afghanistan today.

Troy Price, chair of the Iowa Democratic Party, addresses reporters in Des Moines to explain the delay in releasing the initial results of the 2020 Iowa Caucus.
Grant Gerlock / IPR

Iowa Democratic Party Chair Troy Price has announced he will resign from his post. The announcement Wednesday comes in the wake of a historic caucus night fiasco, in which the party’s results reporting system was hamstrung by a series of critical failures. Results in the first-in-nation contest were delayed for days, and were riddled with errors when they were ultimately released, renewing calls for the state to lose its privileged status in the presidential nominating contest.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

 

On this Politics Day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer speaks with political analysts Megan Goldberg, assistant professor of American politics at Cornell College and Kendron Barwell, chair and professor of political science at Simpson College, about Iowa’s future in the nominating process after messy caucus results. They also discuss how Iowa's caucuses shaped the New Hampshire primary, as well as other political headlines of the week.

 

Guest Include:

Natalie Krebs / IPR File

There are still no official results out of the Iowa Democratic caucuses as of Tuesday, even as New Hampshire voters go to the polls for that state’s first-in-the-nation primary. Even without finalized results, presidential campaigns and politicos are turning their attention away from Iowa. 

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

Follow updates from New Hampshire and find live results reporting from the first-in-the-nation presidential primary. 

John Pemble / IPR File

Persistent errors and inconsistencies in the Iowa Democratic Party’s caucus night precinct results are raising questions about the overall accuracy of the first-in-the-nation contest and preventing the Associated Press from declaring a winner, a week after Iowans first pledged their support for their candidates on Feb. 3. 

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

Democratic presidential candidates are debating for the first time since the Iowa caucuses. There are seven candidates on the stage Friday night in New Hampshire, ahead of Tuesday's primary in the state.

Caucus Meltdown

Feb 6, 2020

The 2020 Iowa Democratic caucuses devolved into chaos when the system for reporting results failed. Technical issues, human error and reporting inaccuracies delayed the outcome for days, and the repercussions are still playing out. On the twentieth episode of Caucus Land, we take a look at the app that broke the caucuses and how Iowa Democrats are responding.


Troy Price, chair of the Iowa Democratic Party, addresses reporters in Des Moines to explain the delay in releasing the initial results of the 2020 Iowa Caucus.
Grant Gerlock / IPR

Iowa Democratic Party Chair Troy Price apologized Tuesday afternoon for technical problems that caused a long delay in reporting the first results from the Iowa caucus.

John Pemble / IPR

The head of the Iowa Democratic Party says the party is manually verifying the results of Monday night’s first-in-the-nation Iowa caucuses. 

What started as the largest and most diverse crop of Democratic presidential candidates in history has been cut down substantially ahead of the February 3rd Iowa caucuses. But it’s not just Iowa that’s winnowed the field. On the nineteenth episode of Caucus Land, we’ll talk about how we got here and what it could mean for the future of the Iowa caucuses.


Gage Skidmore / Flickr

River to River host Ben Kieffer talks with Democratic presidential candidate and businessman Tom Steyer. During this conversation, Steyer addresses his top policy priorities, which include declaring a climate emergency. Steyer also reflects on how his previous experience in business would help him conduct foreign policy and why he started the "need to impeach" movement in 2017.   

Ehimetalor Unuabona / Unsplash

Every four years Iowans are bombarded with telephone calls asking to take a polling survey in preparation for the caucuses. Reading polls can be confusing. Most polls show different outcomes for elections and vary from week to week. In the context of the Iowa caucuses, it's even more confusing because so many likely caucusgoers remain undecided until the last minute. So, how do we understand political polling? We brought in Peter Hanson, Director of the Grinnell National Poll, to explain.

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