Sthefany Nobriga

Talk Show Production Intern
Ponseti International Association / University of Iowa

Each year, nearly 200,000 children worldwide are born with a deformative skeletal birth defect known as clubfoot. On this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by Tom Cook who is the author of the new book "Clubfoot: The Quest For A Better Life For Millions of Children.

Susan Walsh / AP Photo

During this segment of River to River, host Ben Kieffer and political analyst Jim McCormick discuss last week’s impeachment hearings and the rherotic coming from both Republicans and Democrats about the Ukraine affair. 

They take also take a look at where the 2020 presidential candidates stand weeks before the Iowa Caucuses and Hong Kong unrest and the implications it may have on trade between the U.S. and China.

Alejandro Carrasco

 

It's game time. On this edition of Talk of Iowa, we hear stories of sportsmanship and athleticism. From playing basketball on the Nigerian national team, to running and losing the race of a lifetime, Iowans share their best sports stories.

This show was recorded at a recent event sponsored by Iowa Watch: The Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism and Iowa Public Radio at Merge in downtown Iowa City. 

 

Tim Ireland / AP Photo

On this edition of River to River, award-winning historian Andrew Roberts joins host Ben Kieffer to talk about his latest book “Leadership In War, Essential Lessons From Those Who Made History.”  In his book, Roberts makes a comparison of nine world leaders who guided their nations through the greatest wars the world has ever seen and how their unique strenghs and weaknesses changed the course of human history.

Rich Herrmann / Flickr

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with local historian Larry Grill of Schleswig and amateur naturalist Glenn Pollock of Omaha, Nebrasksa about their research of an 1820 expedition through Iowa. 

Oliur / Unsplash

Common Sense Media is a non-profit organization that educates and advocates for families regarding questions around technology and media. A new survey shows dramatic trends among young people, including increases in smartphone usage. 

Justin Brice Guariglia gave up photojournalism to pursue environmental activism a few years ago. Today, he is most well known for his large scale photographic, sculptural and installation-based works inspired by the relationship between the earth and humans. He uses art to try and get his point across that humans are having a negative impact on the planet. 

Matthew Alvarez / IPR

In a new collection of essays, “Some Of Us Are Very Hungry Now,” Andre Perry writes about his journey from Washington D.C. to Iowa City to Hong Kong exploring questions about race, racism, homophobia, self-discovery and identity. 

Ed Robertson / Unsplash

 

Since 2003, The Iowa Center for the Book has been picking an All Iowa Reads book. The goal is to foster a sense of unity in our state through reading. Starting in 2018, the All Iowa Reads Committee expanded the program to include three books, one for adults, one for teens and one for children.

Timothy D. Easley / AP Photo

President Trump faces a low national approval rating and the impeachment inquiry is still in the air. Despite all this, a new set of surveys shows President Trump remains highly competitive in key battleground states – the likeliest to decide his re-election.

Matthew Alvarez / Iowa Public Radio

Barbara Ehrenreich is best known for exposing what it's like to try to get by when you are earning minimum wage in America in her best selling book "Nickled and Dimed."

In her newest book, she turns her unflinching gaze on health care, the fitness industry, the human drive for immortality,  and she describes how people relentlessly worry about what is, in the end, inevitable.

Charlie Neibergall / Associated Press

When you go to the polls next week, don’t forget your ID. The upcoming election will be the first to see the enforcement of Iowa's new voter identification law, further differentiating Iowa's voter regulations from some neighboring states. 

Megan Bannister

With fall colors at their peak in Iowa, and Halloween around the corner, it's a great time for some spooky adventures and fall foliage visits.  

In this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe explores both beautiful and spooky fall excursions with travel writer Megan Banister as she shares her favorite must-see fall destinations. But first, a look at the newly reopeneed Cedar Bridge – one of the six famous covered bridges in Madison County. 

Spooky Iowa Destinations

Jennifer Drinkwater

 

It’s easy to focus on all the things that are wrong in the world today, but Jennifer Drinkwater has a way to recognize the good that is hiding in plain sight. The What’s Good Project is a collaborative archive of the good in communities which feature paintings inspired by interviews, stories, photos, and drawings. 

In this segment of Talk of Iowa, Jennifer Drinkwater joins host Charity Nebbe to discuss how art has a positive impact and how this project can help shape a community. 

 

“Focusing on strengthening those assets helps create a 'spiraling up effect' in communities," Drinkwater says. "It can help strengthen the challenging areas, and I thought why not use this as a way to start an art project."

Drinkwater's work has focused on her native state of Mississippi, and her adopted state of Iowa, but she hopes to connect with people around the world. She says The What's Good Project is, as of now, a continuation of her life's work. 

 

Petr Kosina / Creative Commons

Four hundred years ago, in 1619, the first enslaved African people came to what would become the United States. As we mark that anniversary, there are many projects underway to bring a fuller understanding of the devastation caused by the institution of slavery and how this institution continues to shape the United States today. 

Charity Nebbe / IPR

 

Indigenous People's Day was first celebrated in 1989 in South Dakota, and it has gradually caught on around the country as an alternative to celebrating Columbus Day.

Several cities and towns across Iowa declared the second Monday of October to be Indigenous People's Day in 2017. Governor Kim Reynolds made a statewide declaration in October 2018, and this year many other communities in Iowa have joined the movement. 

Elias Castillo / Unsplash

In this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer examines the historical roots of Latinos living in the heart of the country. Kieffer is joined by Rene Rocha, professor of political science at the University of Iowa,  to discuss migration and the Abolish ICE movement. 

John Pemble / IPR

 

Bonded by their love for literature, both Wini and Sharelle Byars Moranville are related by marriage and they have two separate books being released during the month of October. 

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Wini Moranville and Sharelle Byars Moranville about their book and the stories of how these books came to be.

Fred Dunn / Flickr

Some neighborhoods feel alive and vibrant, with engaged and welcoming communities. On the other hand, some neighborhoods find it difficult to find a successful and thriving identity.

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host  Charity Nebbe asks a panel of experts about the building blocks needed to create a vibrant, healthy and diverse neighborhood. This panel was hosted as part of the 2019 Iowa Ideas Conference in Cedar Rapids, organized by the Cedar Rapids Gazette.

Jason DeCrow / AP Photos

With each passing day, it feels like we are learning more about the effects of climate change. Extreme weather events are increasingly common. These catastrophic events are also having a dramatic impact on our ecosystem and wildlife. 

Vhauri / Flickr

When Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five was published in 1969, it was an instant success. However, it took 25 years for the author to finish his masterpiece. Some of those years were spent in Iowa and the University of Iowa Writer's Workshop.

Slaughterhouse-Five tells the story of Billy Pilgrim, a veteran of World War II, who is "unstuck in time"  and claims to have been abducted by aliens from the planet Tralfamadore. The book explores Pilgrim's life and the aftermath of his experience as a prisoner of war in Germany and how it affected his life.

"It’s very hard keeping those traditions… something that comes from Chile. Even food. There isn’t a restaurant where we can go and eat empanadas, I have to make them. It’s hard to give him a sense of 'you're Chilean.'"
Jamet Colton

People come to Iowa from all over the world for many reasons. Moving to another country and building a new life in a new culture can be incredibly challenging. Raising kids in a culture that is very different from your own takes things to a whole new level.

Children that grow up in an adopted homeland share their parents' genes, but in many cases parents watch those children move away from tradition and embrace a new way of looking at the world. For example, many parents struggle with teaching their native language to their kids. 

Bill Gillette Collection / State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines

Think on this: you’ve lived somewhere your entire life, your family has been there for generations. What if something happens and home no longer feels like home?

Many Iowans experienced that feeling during the Farm Crisis of the 1980s, an event that radically changed our state forever. By the end of the decade, 300,000 farmers had defaulted on their loans. A large number lost their homes and farms.

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

President Trump named Robert O'Brien, to replace John Bolton as his new national security adviser. O'Brien will be the fourth national security adviser in the Trump administration's term. 

Charity Nebbe

A big dream is coming true for film lovers in Downtown Iowa City this week. For the last three years, people have watched the construction of the Chauncey building. This fifteen-story building will have a mixture of commercial and residential space, but what is on the first floor has film lovers excited. On Sept. 20, the new space for FilmScene, a non-profit cinema, and cultural organization will open its doors to the public. 

Dan Rolling / Dan Rolling Photography

It's not uncommon for runners to carefully monitor their diet and health as they train for a long race, but for Morgan Russell, who is training for the New York Marathon, the stakes are higher. She has type -1 diabetes, and managing her blood sugar is an integral part of her everyday life, especially during her intense workouts. 

misskprimary / Flickr

Denison, Iowa has changed a lot over the past 20 years. While many small towns have been shrinking, Denison's population has increased and the town has become far more diverse than it used to be. Over half of the students in Denison schools are English Language Learners. As Iowa towns and cities have become more diverse, teaching English language learners has become a vital part of what schools do.

Cayobo / Flickr

House Democrats passed gun background legislation in February and are expected to vote on more bills next week when members of Congress return to Washington after a six-week recess.

On this "Politics Day" edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with political analysts Cary Covington and Jeff Taylor about President Trump's response to Hurricane Dorian and changes to the democratic caucus as well as other top political headlines of the week. 

Marco Verch Professional / Flickr

More women are drinking alcohol -- and more of it -- than ever before. But why? Three researchers from  Iowa State University want to find out. 

Andreas Aulin / Flickr

Schools are back in session and the fall sports season is underway. We all have heard the horror stories of angry parents on the stands yelling at the coach, the referee, other parents and even student athletes. Last week, the Iowa High School Athletic Association released a statement addressing parent and adult fan behavior at sporting events. They give six ways to behave at games for parents and fans, including “act their age.” Read the IHSAA's full statement here

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