Sthefany Nobriga

Talk Show Production Intern
Carole Anne Oikawa / Flickr

In September of 2019 we learned the number of birds in North America had fallen by 29 percent since 1970.

There are 2.9 billion fewer birds today than there were 50 years ago. Some bird species, however, have increased dramatically in the past 20 years, including two species beloved in Iowa. 

Polk County Housing Trust Fund

Cities and towns across the United States were shaped by a system many people have never heard of.

That system is called redlining -- a discriminatory  practice by which banks and other financial organizations refused to serve specific neighborhoods, usually based on race. 

Macro Polo / Paulson Institute

Macro Polo is a think tank at the Paulson Institute, and earlier this month, they launched a five-part podcast series titled "Heartland Mainland: The Iowa China Podcast." This podcast focuses on explaining U.S.-China relationships and connections to Iowa.

JamesYoung067 / Flickr

A simple eye scan could help detect Alzheimer's or determine the risk for this disease even before other symptoms are detectable. Two Iowa State University researchers received funding from the National Institute on Aging to continue a longitudinal study to better understand links between stress and Alzheimer as a means to help predict the likelihood in which people can develop the disease. 

Photo Courtesy of Kwizera Imani

 

When Kwizera Imani was attending school in the Mtabila refugee camp in Tanzania, he never imagined a life in Iowa, let alone attending college in Ames.

More than a decade later, Imani has graduated from Iowa State University with a degree in aerospace engineering with five interships under his belt and a brand new job  as a senior associate software engineer for Collins Aerospace that will take him from the Midwest to Sterling, Virginia. 

JD Mason/Unsplash

The impacts of trauma can be unexpected, affecting not only mental and emotional health but also physical well being. Through Trauma Sensitive Yoga, a modified yoga practice that prioritizes a healthy realtionship with one's body and similarly informed tai-chi programs, some survivors have found a new kind of relief.

Pete Souza / The Obama White House

In 2007, Iowa native Chris Liddell-Westefeld became a field organizer for the Obama campaign. His early start eventually led to career in White House where he spent five years working for the Obama Administration.

Right before Liddell-Westefeld's departure, he started a project to document President Obama’s historic path to the White House. Twelve years and 200 interviews later, Liddell-Westefeld has now released his book “They Said This Day Would Never Come: Chasing The Dream On Obama’s Improbable Campaign.”

In this segment of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Sean Adams about his debut novel “The Heap,”  which follows the aftermath of the collapse of Los Verticales, a 500-floor vertical city that houses an inner world teeming with life. In his novel, Adams takes us to a dystopian version of our present world, but the people we meet, their motives, and actions are all too familiar.

Tim Ireland / AP Photo

This program originally aired on  11-26-19

On this edition of River to River, award-winning historian Andrew Roberts joins host Ben Kieffer to talk about his latest book “Leadership In War, Essential Lessons From Those Who Made History.”  In his book, Roberts makes a comparison of nine world leaders who guided their nations through the greatest wars the world has ever seen and how their unique strenghs and weaknesses changed the course of human history.

Brent Herrig

Brent Herrig is a culinary lifestyle photographer living in New York City, and he has created a photo exhibit that features the favorite spoons of chefs, bartenders and baristas around the world and the stories behind each spoon. In collaboration with chefs, Herrig shows us in his website the chefs' favorite spoons with the ingredients that inspired them. 

Leander Arkenau / Flickr

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, we get a rundown of some of IPR's favorite new releases from 2019 from classical, folk and blues musicians. Charity Nebbe talks with IPR Classical's Barney Sherman, the Folk Tree's Karen Impola and the one and only Bob Dorr, who hosts Blue Avenue and Backtracks on IPR's Studio One. 

iweatherman / Flickr

In 2005, Richard Louv came out with his book “Last Child in the Woods,” a story that managed to put into words something a lot of people were worrying about - a disconnect between children and nature. In his book, he introduced the term nature-deficit disorder and globalized a movement.

Fourteen years later, Louv is still focusing on that connection with nature in his latest book, “Our Wild Calling: How Connecting with Animals Can Transform Our Lives and Save Theirs.” 

Ponseti International Association / University of Iowa

Each year, nearly 200,000 children worldwide are born with a deformative skeletal birth defect known as clubfoot. On this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by Tom Cook who is the author of the new book "Clubfoot: The Quest For A Better Life For Millions of Children.

Susan Walsh / AP Photo

During this segment of River to River, host Ben Kieffer and political analyst Jim McCormick discuss last week’s impeachment hearings and the rherotic coming from both Republicans and Democrats about the Ukraine affair. 

They take also take a look at where the 2020 presidential candidates stand weeks before the Iowa Caucuses and Hong Kong unrest and the implications it may have on trade between the U.S. and China.

Alejandro Carrasco

 

It's game time. On this edition of Talk of Iowa, we hear stories of sportsmanship and athleticism. From playing basketball on the Nigerian national team, to running and losing the race of a lifetime, Iowans share their best sports stories.

This show was recorded at a recent event sponsored by Iowa Watch: The Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism and Iowa Public Radio at Merge in downtown Iowa City. 

 

Rich Herrmann / Flickr

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with local historian Larry Grill of Schleswig and amateur naturalist Glenn Pollock of Omaha, Nebrasksa about their research of an 1820 expedition through Iowa. 

Oliur / Unsplash

Common Sense Media is a non-profit organization that educates and advocates for families regarding questions around technology and media. A new survey shows dramatic trends among young people, including increases in smartphone usage. 

Justin Brice Guariglia gave up photojournalism to pursue environmental activism a few years ago. Today, he is most well known for his large scale photographic, sculptural and installation-based works inspired by the relationship between the earth and humans. He uses art to try and get his point across that humans are having a negative impact on the planet. 

Matthew Alvarez / IPR

In a new collection of essays, “Some Of Us Are Very Hungry Now,” Andre Perry writes about his journey from Washington D.C. to Iowa City to Hong Kong exploring questions about race, racism, homophobia, self-discovery and identity. 

Ed Robertson / Unsplash

 

Since 2003, The Iowa Center for the Book has been picking an All Iowa Reads book. The goal is to foster a sense of unity in our state through reading. Starting in 2018, the All Iowa Reads Committee expanded the program to include three books, one for adults, one for teens and one for children.

Timothy D. Easley / AP Photo

President Trump faces a low national approval rating and the impeachment inquiry is still in the air. Despite all this, a new set of surveys shows President Trump remains highly competitive in key battleground states – the likeliest to decide his re-election.

Matthew Alvarez / Iowa Public Radio

Barbara Ehrenreich is best known for exposing what it's like to try to get by when you are earning minimum wage in America in her best selling book "Nickled and Dimed."

In her newest book, she turns her unflinching gaze on health care, the fitness industry, the human drive for immortality,  and she describes how people relentlessly worry about what is, in the end, inevitable.

Charlie Neibergall / Associated Press

When you go to the polls next week, don’t forget your ID. The upcoming election will be the first to see the enforcement of Iowa's new voter identification law, further differentiating Iowa's voter regulations from some neighboring states. 

Megan Bannister

With fall colors at their peak in Iowa, and Halloween around the corner, it's a great time for some spooky adventures and fall foliage visits.  

In this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe explores both beautiful and spooky fall excursions with travel writer Megan Banister as she shares her favorite must-see fall destinations. But first, a look at the newly reopeneed Cedar Bridge – one of the six famous covered bridges in Madison County. 

Spooky Iowa Destinations

Jennifer Drinkwater

 

It’s easy to focus on all the things that are wrong in the world today, but Jennifer Drinkwater has a way to recognize the good that is hiding in plain sight. The What’s Good Project is a collaborative archive of the good in communities which feature paintings inspired by interviews, stories, photos, and drawings. 

In this segment of Talk of Iowa, Jennifer Drinkwater joins host Charity Nebbe to discuss how art has a positive impact and how this project can help shape a community. 

 

“Focusing on strengthening those assets helps create a 'spiraling up effect' in communities," Drinkwater says. "It can help strengthen the challenging areas, and I thought why not use this as a way to start an art project."

Drinkwater's work has focused on her native state of Mississippi, and her adopted state of Iowa, but she hopes to connect with people around the world. She says The What's Good Project is, as of now, a continuation of her life's work. 

 

Petr Kosina / Creative Commons

Four hundred years ago, in 1619, the first enslaved African people came to what would become the United States. As we mark that anniversary, there are many projects underway to bring a fuller understanding of the devastation caused by the institution of slavery and how this institution continues to shape the United States today. 

Charity Nebbe / IPR

 

Indigenous People's Day was first celebrated in 1989 in South Dakota, and it has gradually caught on around the country as an alternative to celebrating Columbus Day.

Several cities and towns across Iowa declared the second Monday of October to be Indigenous People's Day in 2017. Governor Kim Reynolds made a statewide declaration in October 2018, and this year many other communities in Iowa have joined the movement. 

Elias Castillo / Unsplash

In this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer examines the historical roots of Latinos living in the heart of the country. Kieffer is joined by Rene Rocha, professor of political science at the University of Iowa,  to discuss migration and the Abolish ICE movement. 

John Pemble / IPR

 

Bonded by their love for literature, both Wini and Sharelle Byars Moranville are related by marriage and they have two separate books being released during the month of October. 

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Wini Moranville and Sharelle Byars Moranville about their book and the stories of how these books came to be.

Fred Dunn / Flickr

Some neighborhoods feel alive and vibrant, with engaged and welcoming communities. On the other hand, some neighborhoods find it difficult to find a successful and thriving identity.

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host  Charity Nebbe asks a panel of experts about the building blocks needed to create a vibrant, healthy and diverse neighborhood. This panel was hosted as part of the 2019 Iowa Ideas Conference in Cedar Rapids, organized by the Cedar Rapids Gazette.

Pages