Sthefany Nobriga

Talk Show Production Intern
Courtesy of Troy Stolp

This program originally aired on February 25, 2020.  

The relationship between Council Bluffs and Omaha goes back thousands of years. Evidence shows inhabitants of the region date as far back as 900 A.D. With such a long history of being joined across the Missouri River, Council Bluffs and Omaha have developed a complicated relationship.

campuspartymexico / Flickr

Violent video games are wildly popular and have been for decades. Games such as Fortnite, Grand Theft Auto, Call of Duty, Doom and so many more are played by children across the country. 

 

Micaela Parente / Unsplash

Homo erectus evolved around 2 million years ago, and was the first known human species to walk fully upright.

After Homo erectus dispersed from Africa, the species colonized the ancient world.  Then, about 400,000 years ago, Homo erectus essentially vanished, with the lone exception of an Indonesian island.

chuttersnap / Unsplash

River to River host Ben Kieffer speaks with Marc Schneider of Iowa State University's Center for Industrial Research and Service to discuss how the  COVID-19 outbreak has impacted Iowa's trade economy.

Guest: 

  • Marc Schneider, project manager at Iowa State University’s Center for Industrial Research and Service

GegenWind Photo / Unsplash

Let’s hop in the time machine, going back, way back, to a time before humans – traveling about three billion years to when Earth was a “water world."

On this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by Ben Johnson to discuss his field work on exposed ancient, ocean crust in a remote part of Western Australia. 

Phil Roeder / Flickr

On this episode of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by political scientists Steffen Schmidt of Iowa State University and Donna Hoffman of  the University of Northern Iowa, for a look at what the results from Super Tuesday mean for the rest of the primary season. 

Universal Productions France

Jean Seberg grew up in Marshalltown. She became an international movie star and lived most of her adult life in Paris. Seberg starred in 37 films and is possibly best remembered for her role in the movie “Breathless,” the forefront of the French New Wave movement. 

In this episode of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe speaks with the filmmaking team behind the documentary “Movie Star: The Secret Lives of Jean Seberg,” to give us their thoughts of the new film “Seberg.” 

Matt Alvarez / IPR

Brandon Taylor's new novel "Real Life" is attracting a great deal of attention. The critically acclaimed book tells the story of a group of friends studying biochemistry at a large midwestern University — easily recognized as the University of Wisconsin. 

Michal Galezewski / Unsplash

 

After centuries of large-scale destruction, humans need to recreate and reconnect habitat for the health of the natural and human worlds. 

 

Ecologist Nick Haddad has been working to create habitats and researching the power of connecting them into corridors.

Jessica Hill / AP Photo

In many countries, the novel coronavirus continues to spread at a fast pace. As of March 3, the U.S. has confirmed nine deaths in the state of Washington, and there are 13 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Nebraska. How at risk is the U.S. as the number of confirmed cases increases and what is Iowa doing to prepare for a potential pandemic

Eric Gutschmidt / Gutschmidt Properties

 

 

There is a house on 8th Ave. SW in Cedar Rapids that's been turning heads. It’s a property that had been in bad shape, known as a local drug house and blight on the neighborhood.

AP Photo

 

On this "politics day" edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by political scientists Dennis Goldford of Drake University and Tim Hagle of the University of Iowa for a look at the future of the Democratic caucuses in Nevada and Iowa, following comments from some Nevada state leaders that call the future of Nevada's caucus process into question.

 

The trio also discuss the latest democratic presidential debate as well as other political headlines from the week. 

Andrew Dunham

A few weeks ago, Andrew and Melissa Dunham of Grinnell Heritage Farms announced they will not offer their storied community-supported agriculture, or CSA, program in 2020. They're scaling back their operation, and selling off equipment. Grinnell Heritage Farms has been one of the highest-profile, most admired local food operations in the state, and this announcement has raised concerns for farmers and advocates of the  local food movement across the state. 

Greg Thatcher

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe is joined by Fairfield-based artist Greg Thatcher, who has been making art inspired by yew trees for more than 30 years. Thatcher talks about his “Sacred Yew” exhibit at the Greater Des Moines Botanical Garden and his multi-decade relationship with a single grove of yew trees in a small English town. 

Kathleen Ronayne/AP

The film "Erin Brockovich," starring Julia Roberts came out in 2000 and is based on the true story of Brockovich, a legal researcher, activist and single mother who uncovered a 30-year long industrial poisoning of a small town’s water supply by Pacific Gas and Electric. 

Mary Altaffer / AP Photo

On this Politics Day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with political scientists Jim McCormick and Jonathan Hassid, of Iowa State University about President Trump's unhappiness with William Barr after the Attorney General said Trump's tweeting was making it "impossible for him to do his job."

They also discuss Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg, who has spent more than $400 million on his 2020 campaign so far, and what that means for elections of the future. And Ben has his guests reflect on COVID-19's impact on the Chinese economy and the state of Afghanistan today.

J.Scott Applewhite / AP

 This program origionally aired on 7-2-2019.   

We all know that February is Black History Month. The designation of that month, which dates back almost 50 years, created some space for learning about important moments in Black history in almost all public schools and in popular media. Unfortunately the way Black history is taught can be problematic, and focusing on Black Americans in February doesn’t prevent them and other communities of color from being left out of the national historic narrative the rest of the year. 

Katie Peikes / IPR File

For communities along the Iowa side of the Missouri River, March of 2019 was a disaster. Flooding rocked the region impacting residents, business owners and farmers. Forecasts for the spring of 2020 suggest new flooding conditions, which could impact many of these communities still recovering from last year’s impact.

summonedbyfells / Flickr

Feb. 12 marks the 211 anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin. Over the last several decades, a movement to establish an international Darwin Day holiday has been growing. A group in Iowa City celebrates Darwin Day every year by highlighting the work of modern evolutionary scientists. 

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

 

On this Politics Day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer speaks with political analysts Megan Goldberg, assistant professor of American politics at Cornell College and Kendron Barwell, chair and professor of political science at Simpson College, about Iowa’s future in the nominating process after messy caucus results. They also discuss how Iowa's caucuses shaped the New Hampshire primary, as well as other political headlines of the week.

 

Guest Include:

Phil Roeder / flickr

 

Iowa is full of old structures including barns, churches and abandoned schools. Some enterprising Iowans have turned old structures into beautiful, non-traditional homes. What does it take to improve an old home or to turn a barn into a house?

Charity Nebbe / Iowa Public Radio

"Black Sunday" tells the story of a family living in Lagos, Nigeria. Told over 20 years, the book tells of their attempts to cling to their middle-class lifestyle and subsequent plunge into poverty. In this episode of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe speaks with Tola Rotimi Abraham about her debut novel.

Coast Guard News / Flickr

 

From wildfires in California and Australia to category five hurricanes destroying small islands, Jerry Schnoor describes how climate change has manifested itself around the world. Iowa has experienced the effect of climate change through severe flooding and intense precipitations. 

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

River to River host Ben Kieffer talks with Democratic presidential candidate and businessman Tom Steyer. During this conversation, Steyer addresses his top policy priorities, which include declaring a climate emergency. Steyer also reflects on how his previous experience in business would help him conduct foreign policy and why he started the "need to impeach" movement in 2017.   

Carole Anne Oikawa / Flickr

In September of 2019 we learned the number of birds in North America had fallen by 29 percent since 1970.

There are 2.9 billion fewer birds today than there were 50 years ago. Some bird species, however, have increased dramatically in the past 20 years, including two species beloved in Iowa. 

Polk County Housing Trust Fund

Cities and towns across the United States were shaped by a system many people have never heard of.

That system is called redlining -- a discriminatory  practice by which banks and other financial organizations refused to serve specific neighborhoods, usually based on race. 

Macro Polo / Paulson Institute

Macro Polo is a think tank at the Paulson Institute, and earlier this month, they launched a five-part podcast series titled "Heartland Mainland: The Iowa China Podcast." This podcast focuses on explaining U.S.-China relationships and connections to Iowa.

JamesYoung067 / Flickr

A simple eye scan could help detect Alzheimer's or determine the risk for this disease even before other symptoms are detectable. Two Iowa State University researchers received funding from the National Institute on Aging to continue a longitudinal study to better understand links between stress and Alzheimer as a means to help predict the likelihood in which people can develop the disease. 

Photo Courtesy of Kwizera Imani

 

When Kwizera Imani was attending school in the Mtabila refugee camp in Tanzania, he never imagined a life in Iowa, let alone attending college in Ames.

More than a decade later, Imani has graduated from Iowa State University with a degree in aerospace engineering with five interships under his belt and a brand new job  as a senior associate software engineer for Collins Aerospace that will take him from the Midwest to Sterling, Virginia. 

JD Mason/Unsplash

The impacts of trauma can be unexpected, affecting not only mental and emotional health but also physical well being. Through Trauma Sensitive Yoga, a modified yoga practice that prioritizes a healthy realtionship with one's body and similarly informed tai-chi programs, some survivors have found a new kind of relief.

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