Emily Woodbury

Talk Show Producer

Emily Woodbury has worked for Iowa Public Radio since 2011. She became a talk show producer in 2012. Her duties include researching show topics, booking guests, preparing news copy, editing audio, and directing live programming for IPR’s national-award winning shows River to River and Talk of Iowa.

She is a member of Student Broadcasters Incorporated, which serves as an advisory board to the students who work at KRUI FM in Iowa City. She is also the PR director for Iowa City's roller derby league, Old Capitol City Roller Derby.

Prior to joining Iowa Public Radio, Emily worked as a news director for KRUI and as an intern for Chicago Public Media. She has won awards for her reporting and a couple of her news reports have been featured statewide on Iowa Public Radio's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Emily has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Iowa School of Journalism and Mass Communication and a minor in political science.

John Pemble

This program originally aired on 8-15-18.

 

Corn dogs, baby ducks, and a butter cow to boot!

 

The Iowa State Fair is a time-honored tradition for many Iowans, and has gained a reputation for being one of the largest fairs in the nation.

 

Do you remember your first fair? 

Honza Soukup

This program originally aired on 1-10-18.

Pediatricians agree that breast milk is the healthiest source of nutrition for a newborn baby, and breast feeding rates are on the rise in the United States. But, nursing a baby isn’t always an option.

“Our daughter was full-term,” says Sarah Fillmore of Des Moines, “but she had to be in the NICU for about a week, and she had some breathing problems when she was born that made it difficult for her to learn how to latch.”

Emily Woodbury

This program originally aired on 11-29-17.

Artist Rose Frantzen grew up in Maquoketa and started painting portraits when she was in high school. Since then, she’s gained national and international acclaim for her oil paintings. She lives and works with her husband, Chuck Morris, an acclaimed artist of his own right.

Iowa seems like an unlikely destination for two very successful artists who met in New York City’s Central Park, but Rose Frantzen and Chuck Morris have made Maquoketa their home, their workplace, and an artistic destination.

Charlie Neibergall

This program originally aired on 04-04-19. 

During an extended stay in the intensive care unit of a hospital, it’s common for patients to experience delirium. They may begin to see or hear things that aren’t there, experience delusions, or suffer from extreme confusion.

“It can be very distressing to family members and loved ones because it’s an acute and drastic change from someone’s normal cognitive baseline,” says Dr. Nick Butler, a geriatrician at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.

William Simpson (artist, 1823–1899)

This program origionally aired on 11-19-2018.

On this edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer talks with medical historian Thomas Morris about his new book, “The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth and Other Curiosities from the History of Medicine,” which details mysterious Illnesses, horrifying operations, dubious remedies and unfortunate predicaments from the early 17th Century to the turn of the 20th Century.

NOAA

This year, the Gulf of Mexico’s dead zone is forecast to be near record size. 

In this edition of River to River, we look at the role of nutrient pollution along the Mississippi River in creating this large, low-oxygenated area. Host Ben Kieffer sits down with Katie Peikes, Iowa Public Radio’s western Iowa reporter, and Chris Jones, a research engineer at the University of Iowa’s IIHR Hydroscience and Engineering to discuss Iowa’s influence on the issue.

Clay Masters / IPR

River to River's "Home State View" series helps us understand how the presidential candidates are viewed as leaders in the states they call home. Host Ben Kieffer interviews journalists who have spent years covering the candidates. We get the little-known details about each hopeful's history. Click the "play" button to listen.

U.S. Air Force photo/Carol Lawrence

Persistent exposure to death and trauma puts firefighters, police officers, dispatchers, and paramedics at increased risk for negative mental health symptoms.

In this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer asks first responders how they go about tackling those challenges and how they get support for post-traumatic stress and depression related to their work.

Then, we examine why interest in becoming a police officer is down dramatically across the country as well as here in Iowa, and what’s being done about it.

Guests in today’s program include:

S Kaya / Flickr

Recently, the Iowa Supreme Court has ruled on cases dealing with Iowa's 2017 collective bargaining law, the judicial nomination process, wind energy restrictions, and jury selection and representation.

D-Day was arguably the most important day of the 20th century.

Tony Dehner

When Jim Hamlyn was deployed to Vietnam from 1966 to 1967, he took a 8mm movie camera with him. Like many soldiers that returned home, the haunting memories and complicated emotions came home with him, along with a rare collection of movies that have been given new life as part of the documentary, "A Bad Deal: My Vietnam War Story."

Oleksandr K / Flickr

Our ever-present electronic devices have changed so much about the way we live, including how we read books. 

Timberland Regional Library

A downed tree may seem like an expensive cleanup project, but to Monica Tiffany, a small business owner from McGregor, a large piece of wood is a blank canvas.

Charity Nebbe

This program originally aired on July 18, 2017.

Rivers are a vital part of Iowa's ecosystem.

“Rivers in Iowa are the most important corridors of habitat, the ribbons of habitat, that we have left," says  wildlife biologist Jim Pease.

Over the past four summers Pease has paddled 1800 miles of Iowa rivers. On these trips he’s learned a lot about habitat, water quality, and human impact on the water ways. 

US Departmen of Defense

For ten years, Major General Timothy Orr served as adjutant general for the Iowa National Guard, and his entire career in the guard spans more than 40 years. On this segment of River to River host Ben Kieffer talks with Orr about his recent retirement and the challenges and highlights of overseeing the Iowa National Guard, including combat tours in the Middle East and disaster relief around the country.

Courtesy of Jeff Schmid

At the age of 50, Jeff Schmid wasn't looking for a breakthrough as a professional golfer, but he recently earned his way into two major PGA tournaments.

John Pemble

In this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by five freshman lawmakers who reflect on their first session at the Iowa Statehouse. They discuss what propelled them into politics, the challenges they faced as new lawmakers, and what they hope to focus on next year.

Emily Woodbury

  This program originally aired on November 8, 2018.

On this special edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer and producer Emily Woodbury join a hundred veterans living in eastern Iowa as they take a tour of our nation's capital as part of an honor flight trip.

Honor flights are conducted by non-profit organizations dedicated to transporting as many U.S. military veterans as possible to see war memorials in Washington, D.C., at no cost to the veterans. 

Mike Mozart / Flickr

  

Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, manufactured by Monsanto-Bayer, is widely used in Iowa. It's sprayed on thousands of acres of farmland each year and is commonly used in lawns and gardens.

Earlier this month, a California jury awarded a couple more than $2 million in a dispute against Monsanto, ruling that the plaintiffs contracted non-Hodgkin lymphoma because of their use of Roundup. This is the third such case to end this way in California in the last two years.

davidwilson1949

You wouldn't expect a world-renowned charcoal and pastel artist like Cecile Houel to move from Paris to the southeastern corner of Iowa, and she didnt either. But Houel fell in love with Iowa, drawing strength and inspiration from the Mississippi River.

In this Talk of Iowa segment, Charity Nebbe talks with Houel about her life and career in Paris, her first impressions of Iowa and what has kept her here, her love of humanity, and her desire to heal through her work.

Richard Koenig

 

Debra Marquart had not originally intended to become an acclaimed poet, a distinguished professor at Iowa State University, or Iowa's next poet laureate. Marquart instead wanted to be a road musician, singing lead for a rock band and traveling from gig to gig, but life took her on a different path. 

In this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Marquart about being named the new Iowa Poet Laureate, her life as a road musician before her literary pursuits, and the impact poetry can have on people.

Silvester Franz / Flickr

For centuries, yoga has served as a healing and therapeutic practice that has helped many who have encountered trauma in their life.

"When trauma happens, there is this lack of power, this lack of choice over what is happening," says Julie Jack, founder and editor of The Exhale Project, a grant funded program that offers free yoga classes to survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, human trafficking and other related traumas.

Jason Garber / Flickr

The 8-track tape was a revolutionary technology that allowed people to play music on-demand in their vehicles. It was a very popular medium in the United States from the mid 1960s to early 1980s, but it's popularity was short-lived.

In this edition of Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks with Bob Anders, who is working to reinvigorate the appeal of the 8-track with his show, "Bob’s 8-Track Garage Sale" on KHOI-FM in Ames.

John Pemble / Iowa Public Radio

In a world where it seems like everyone is incredibly busy, author Tracey Kelley would like us to slow down and be more present in our own lives.

Emily Woodbury / Iowa Public Radio

In 1929, there were 9,098 men licensed to fly in the United States, and just 117 women. That year, a group of ninety-nine female pilots, let by Amelia Earhart, got together to break down barriers for women in flight.

90 years later, flying is still a largely male-dominated hobby and profession.

Emily Woodbury

In this edition of Pints and Politics, panelists discuss the problems with determining the "electability" of presidential candidates, talk about Iowa's 2020 congressional races, and predict what unfinished legislative priorities might pop up again next year at the Iowa Statehouse. 

They also say farewell to Gazette columnist, Lynda Waddington, who is leaving her position as a columnist to take a job at Tanager Place, a regional nonprofit with a focus on children's mental health. 

In 2018, Republican David Young was defeated by Democrat Cindy Axne in Iowa’s 3rd Congressional District. This week, Young announced plans to try and reclaim the seat.

In this Politics Day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with analysts about Young's plan to take back the seat he lost in the 2018 midterms, the continuation of the Mueller saga, and an the escalation in tension with Iran and North Korea. 

Also, a reporter from WVPE in Indiana provides a home state perspective of the life and work of 2020 hopeful Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Roughly 15 percent of Iowa residents are ethnic minorities, yet the state has just a few non-white legislators.

In this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with the four members of Iowa's Legislative Black Caucus, formed last month: Rep. Ruth Ann Gaines, D-Des Moines; Rep. Ras Smith, D-Waterloo; Rep. Phyllis Thede, D-Bettendorf; and Rep. Ako Abdul-Samad, D-Des Moines.

Gage Skidmore

This conversation originally aired on February 8, 2018.

In the process of inventing a fantasy world, sometimes characters need a whole new language. And that language can bring so much more to the story than just acoustic flavor.

"The moment you create a word, it assumes so much about the world where this language is spoken," says David Peterson, the linguist who developed the Dothraki and Valyrian languages for HBO's Game of Thrones.

Kirsty Wigglesworth

The World Health Organization just released an alarming report predicting that by 2050, antibiotic resistance “could cause 10 million deaths each year.”

In this episode of River to River, host Ben Kieffer checks in with Iowa researchers and medical professionals about the worldwide threat of the increasing resistance to antibiotics, as well as the role livestock production plays in that increase.

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