Dennis Reese

Mid-Day Host and Talk Show Producer

Dennis Reese is the mid-day host for Iowa Public Radio.  He is also a producer for the talk shows Talk of Iowa and River to River.  He is based in Iowa City. Dennis began his career in public radio at the University of Iowa’s WSUI in 1981 as its Program Director, after several stints as News Director at a number of commercial radio stations in Iowa and after working his way through college as a disc jockey in formats including Top 40, Easy Listening and country & western.  

Dennis has a master’s degree in Communication Studies from the University of Iowa and a  B.A. in Communication Studies from the University of Northern Iowa.

Dennis’ favorite public radio program is Car Talk.

Andrew Ridker

"The Altruists," tells the story of Arthur Alter, a father who has alienated his adult children but finds himself needing to reconnect with them, thanks to his foundering career and economic situation. 

 

Author Alicia Dill joined the military at the age 17, just weeks before the September 11 terrorist attacks in New York City. Suddenly, her world changed. Dill spent the next six years as a Public Affairs Specialist for the National Guard, through which she was eventually deployed to Kosovo for 14 months.

On this hour of Talk of Iowa, Host Charity Nebbe and Dill discuss "Squared Away," Dill's first novel, which is inspired by her time in the military.

UNSPLASH

Barb Stein's Reading List

Picture Books/Board Books

I Ain't Gonna Paint No More by Karen Beaumont

Lion and Mouse by Jairo Buitrago

Camp Tiger by Susan Choi

Gondra's Treasure by Linda Sue Park

Transitional Books

Juana & Lucas Big Problems by Juana Medina

Good Dog, McTavish by Meg Rosoff

Big Foot and Little Foot The Squatchicorns by Ellen Potter

Middle School

UNSPLASH

 

Whether you’re looking for scientific exploration, captivating memoir, or an opportunity to get lost in a novel, summer is the perfect time to pick up a new book release.

W.W. Norton & Co.

This program originally aired on August 16, 2017.

This hour, host Charity Nebbe speaks live with two Iowa writers, Inara Verzemnieks and Elizabeth Dinschel.

Craig A Rodway / flickr

This program originally aired on August 2, 2017, and makes mention to an upcoming Bix 7 race. The next annual date for this event is July 27, 2019. 

Bix Beiderbecke was a self-taught cornet player from Davenport, a white kid from the corn belt born in 1903.  He only lived to be 28 years old, but against all odds his musical influence has lasted for generations. 

State Historical Society of Iowa

Buxton, Iowa was a company town, but it wasn't like any other company town. It was founded by Consolidation Coal Company in 1900 and when the company recruited miners they did not discriminate on the basis of race. Buxton became Iowa's first fully integrated town and the community thrived until the coal ran out. On this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe sat down with author Rachelle Chase to talk about her new book, "Creating the Black Utopia of Buxton Iowa".

Courtesy of the Gable Family

This interview originally aired on July 5, 2017.

Olympic gold medalist Dan Gable has been a household name in Iowa for decades. After bringing home three state wrestling championships in high school, he went on to the 1972 Munich Olympics, where he successfully wrestled without losing a single point. He famously coached the University of Iowa team to win 15 NCAA titles before retiring after the 1997 season. Since then he has continued to coach and has been actively working to keep Olympic and collegiate wrestling alive and thriving.

 

The new film, “Sons and Daughters of Thunder” tells the story of the anti-slavery debates that took place at the Ohio Lane theological Seminary in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1834. These controversial meetings, lead by abolitionists, were the first to publically discuss the end of slavery in the U.S. and served as a catalyst for major social activism and change at the seminary and throughout the wider Cincinnati community. 

Abingdon Press

For white people who are committed to equity and justice, living in a nation that remains racially unjust and still deeply segregated creates unique challenges.  These challenges begin early in life and impact the racial development of white children in powerful ways.

James Pritchett

A Lot of Iowans have been planting milkweed over the years in an effort to bring Monarch butterflies back from the brink, and there has been some success. But dramatic changes in the landscape due to large scale agriculture and our own personal landscapes have such an impact, that planting milkweed is just a drop in the bucket.

Wapsipinicon Almanac

In 1988, Tim Fay of Anamosa, Iowa had an idea: to publish on an antique letterpress assembled of parts he found all over the country, a yearly (or occasional) journal "to silence anyone who thinks Iowa doesn't have a literary culture."  The Wapsipincon Almanac was born, named after the scenic river that runs through Fay's Anamosa and Northeast Iowa.

University of Iowa Press

One of the great secrets of Iowa sports history is that the Hawkeye State had a professional basketball team at one time.  It didn't last long (just one season) and the new NBA had a hard time attracting fans, but Iowa fans were thrilled to have the Waterloo Hawks as part of the league.

Wall Boat/Flickr

"We the Interwoven: an Anthology of Bicultural Iowa" from the Iowa Writers' House is one of the first books of its kind. It's an anthology of work written and illistrated by Iowans with multicultural backgrounds, and it's aimed at telling truly Iowa stories that often go unheard. 

In this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe is joined by Andrea Wilson, editor of We the Interwoven and founder of the Iowa Writer's House in Iowa City, for a discussion on the creation of the book, and the Bicultural Iowa Writer's Fellowship that jumpstarted its founding. 

Charity Nebbe/Iowa Public Radio

It's that time of year again! Make your list and check it twice, because here are some holiday book recommendations from some of Iowa's greatest bibliophiles. Jan Weismiller and Tim Budd from Prairie Lights Bookstore in Iowa City and Hunter Gillum from Beaverdale Books in Des Moines share their top fiction and non-fiction picks of 2018.

bricolagelife / Flickr

Looking to inspire young readers this holiday season? Never fear! Iowa booksellers and authors are here! 

Riverhead Books

Casey Gerald has written a memoir, "There Will Be No Miracles Here." (Riverhead Books)  Gerald was the final speaker in this year's Green Room series, a community-wide educational experiment at the Englert Theatre in Iowa City and a University of Iowa Honors Course taught by Dave Gould.

HarperCollins

Fantasy author Sarah Prineas of Iowa City has a new book for middle-grade readers, "The Lost Books." (HarperCollins)  The book came out this summer and launches an exciting new series from Prineas, the author of the acclaimed "Magic Thief" series. 

Charity speaks with Prineas during this segment and the author reads some passages from "The Lost Books" as well.  We find out the powerful "Lost Books" at the palace library are infesting people with an evil magic and two unlikely friends must figure out who, or what, is controlling the books and their power. 

Schenectadyhistory.org

One hundred years ago, more than 93,000 Iowans came down with what was at first a mysterious malady.  Eventually 6,116 died from what became known as the Spanish Influenza, although historian and Iowa native Michael Luick-Thrams says the pandemic actually originated in Kansas.  It went on to kill about fifty million people worldwide that year.

Phil Roeder

Long-time Iowa City resident and retired teacher Mark D. Wilson never expected to write a book about his hero Nile Kinnick, but when someone mentioned to him that this year is the 100th anniversary of the renowned football player's birth, he felt he had to do it. The result is the newly published The Way of Nile C. Kinnick, Jr: Insights, Images, and Stories of Iowa's 1939 Heisman Trophy Winner

Creative Commons: Pixnio

 

Malinda McCollum and Anthony Varallo are both graduates of the Iowa Writers Workshop, enthusiasts of the short story form, and authors of their own, new story collections. They’re also married to each other.

In this episode of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks to McCollum and Varallo about what draws them to short stories, both as writers and readers, and how the pair successfully manage writing projects, full teaching loads at the College of Charleston, and parenting

Charity Nebbe

 

 

What happens after we die? It’s a question that we can’t answer. But more and more people are reporting what happened to them during a "near-death experience." And if you listen closely to their stories, some fascinating clues to the question emerge.

Katherine Perkins

Summer is a great time to crack open a book and escape into worlds both imaginary and real. During this episode of Talk of Iowa, Jan Weismiller and Tim Budd of Prairie Lights Bookstore in Iowa City and Kathy Magruder of Pageturners Bookstore in Indianola join host Charity Nebbe to share their favorite reads for your summer list.

Vintage Books

For more than 25 years, U.S. TV viewers have been captivated by "reality television," watching "real people" in supposedly unscripted events.  Author Lucas Mann is not immune to this guilty pleasure.

Truman Library

  

In the aftermath of WWII, the court system in Germany underwent a dramatic shift as the Allies launched an initiative to rid German and Austrian society of any remnants of national socialism. This process was called denazification. 

On this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Judy Hamilton Crockett, whose father Clarence E. Hamilton was head of all civil courts and prisons in Nuremberg after WWII.

Community Environmental Council

In the last three decades, the Earth has lost half of its coral reefs. In 2016, Australia’s Great Barrier Reef lost nearly 30 percent of its coral. In 2017, this number rose to 50 percent.

While there are a number of different factors at play, it's increasingly clear that the warming of the world's oceans are a major contributor to this loss.

New York Times

Although it goes by the humble name "M.910," an ancient manuscript book knows as a "codex" at the Morgan Library in New York City is on its way to a high-tech adventure.  Written in Coptic script by monks somewhere between 400 and 600 A.D., scholars such as the University of Iowa's Paul Dilley are excited that it may soon become legible for the first time.

Daniel R. Blume / http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

Obituaries are not what they used to be. They have gone through many changes since they first started appearing in newspapers, but in recent years they have been radical and rapid. 

Iowa writer Mary Kay Shanley has been studying obituaries and how they've changed; she also teaches people how to write them. During this Talk of Iowa conversation, she talks with host Charity Nebbe. 

Shanley is also the author of Our State Fair: Iowa's Blue Ribbon Story, The Memory Box, and She Taught Me to Eat Artichokes. 

Wordpress

The Oxford Dictionaries declared "youthquake" as its Word of the Year for 2017, although we found out that it was  originally coined in about 1965 by the fashion industry.  This hour, host Charity Nebbe speaks again with our "Word Maven," Patricia O'Conner, proprietor of the popular language blog, "Grammarphobia."  O'Conner is the author of a number of language books, including "Woe is I," "Words Fail Me," and "Origins of the Specious."

Image courtesy of Iowa History Camp

In its third year, History Camp Iowa is a daylong series of presentations from a mix of professional and amateur historians who share their expertise with history buffs from all over the state. History Camp Iowa features more than 30 distinct presentations, behind-the-scenes access to the State Historical Museum, and opportunities to meet authors and learn about history organizations.

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