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"Not Guilty:" The U.S. Senate Has Acquitted President Trump Of Two Articles Of Impeachment

UPDATE Feb. 5: After reconvening at 3 p.m. Central, the U.S. Senate voted to acquit President Trump of the two articles of impeachment presented by the House of Representatives: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. 

Republican Sen. Mitt Romney voted with Senate Democrats on the abuse of power article, resulting in a final vote of 48 - 52. All Senate Republicans voted against obstruction of Congress, for a final vote count being 47 - 53. Both of Iowa's senators voted "not guilty" on both articles of impeachment. 

Previous daily post updates continue below:

Day 12 (Feb. 5): Today is the twelfth and final day of the U.S. Senate trial on the impeachment of President Trump, who is accused by the U.S. House of abusing his power and obstructing Congress. The senate will reconvene at 3 p.m. Central to begin the process of voting on two articles of impeachment. With one Republican expressing intent to support an article of impeachment, it is likely that Trump will be acquitted. You can watch the proceedings live here. 

Day 11 (Feb. 3): The U.S. Senate, on Friday, voted against hearing from witnesses in the impeachment trial. Today, there will be four hours of closing arguments. It is expected the closing arguments will be divided equally between the House impeachment managers and President Trump's defense team. Following closing arguments, the trial will be adjourned until Wednesday. The trial will resume at 10 a.m. Central time. 

UPDATE: Feb. 3's session has concluded. Senators are able to use the time between Monday and Wednesday's vote to speak from the floor with their thoughts and final position on removal from office. 

Day 10 (Jan 31): With the question portion of the trial concluded, the prosecution and defense now have two hours each for additional arguments prior to senators taking up the issue of calling witnesses. If a decision is made not to call witnesses, the trial may speedily wrap up - concluding as soon as Friday evening. The trial will resume at 12 p.m. Central time. 

Day 9 (Jan 30): Senators will continue and conclude by the end of the day their total of 16 available hours for questions of both the prosecution and the defense. After the questions conclude, the prosecution and defense both have two hours each for additional arguments prior to senators taking up the issue of calling witnesses.  The additional arguments and debate around calling witnesses is expected to occur Friday. The trial will resume at 12 p.m. Central time. 

Day 8 (Jan 29): President Trump’s defense team concluded their case against removal from office early Tuesday afternoon. Senators now have 16 hours over two days for questions of both the prosecution and the defense. Senators will submit written questions to the House impeachment managers and Trump’s defense lawyers through U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts, with each party alternating. After the questions wrap up, senators will then take up whether to call witnesses.  The trial is expected to resume at 12 p.m. Central time. 

Day 7 (Jan 28): President Trump's defense team concludes their case against removal from office. The defense on Monday argued that President Trump did nothing rising to the level of abuse of power or be an impeachable offense. By the end of the day, the defense had discussed the role of Rudy Guiliani and the role of the Bidens in Ukraine. The trial is expected to resume at 12 p.m. Central time. 

Day 6 (Jan 27): President Trump's defense team continues to present their case against removal from office. Saturday's brief session set the stage for their argument that Trump did nothing wrong. The trial is expected to resume at 12 p.m. Central time. 

Day 5 (Jan 25): President Trump's defense team will begin to present their case. The Saturday session is expected to last a few hours, and will likely lay the groundwork for their more expansive defense starting Monday. The trial is expected to resume at 9 a.m. Central time. 

Day 4 (Jan 24): Oral arguments from the prosecutors will conclude by the end of Day 4. It is likely that the prosecutors will use their remaining 8 hours available to state their case. If they do, President Trump's defense team will present their case starting Saturday. The trial is again expected to resume at noon Central time. 

Day 3 (Jan 23): Oral arguments from the prosecutors continue on Day 3, and may extend up to one more day. The trial is again expected to resume at noon Central time. 

Day 2 (Jan 22): Late in the night of Day 1, on partisan lines, the Senate approved the organizational resolution, setting the procedures for the impeachment trial. Senate Democrats put forth 11 amendments, all of which were rejected.

Oral arguments from the prosecutors will begin on Day 2, and may extend up to three days. The prosecutors for the trial are the House impeachment managers. Details on who the House managers are can be found in a previous post below. The trial is expected to resume at noon Central time. 

Day 1 (Jan 21): The first day of the trial is expected to largely focus on presenting and debating the resolution for the procedure of the trial. A resolution setting the procedure for the trial must be passed before evidence is presented to senators.