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Liveblog: 1,510 Cases Of COVID-19 Confirmed In 79 Iowa Counties

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Brian Powers
/
The Des Moines Register via AP, Pool
Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds speaks during a press conference updating Iowan's on the status of COVID-19 cases on Thursday, April 2, 2020, in Johnston.

Iowa businesses, school districts and citizens continue to respond to the escalating COVID-19 pandemic. We'll be posting updates as more news regarding the spread of the virus in Iowa becomes available here for the week of April 5-11. 

For information from March 29-April 4, check here

Do you have questions about how the outbreak is being handled in Iowa? Fill out this form, and we'll try to answer as many of your questions as we can with our reporting. 

Find a map of cases in Iowa by county here. Find more information from the Iowa Department of Public Health here. 

Find a map of cases across the U.S. here. 

Iowa map
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Saturday, April 11

10:16 a.m. - Three more deaths, 122 new cases confirmed

The state announced 122 new, positive cases of COVID-19 in Iowa Saturday, for a total of 1,510 positive cases. Three more Iowans have died, bringing the death toll in the state to 34.

New Cases: 122 Confirmed Cases: 1,510 Deaths: 34

So far, there have been 15,622 negative tests to date, and as of Saturday 118 Iowans are hospitalized with the virus. 

According to IDPH, the three new deaths were among:

  • Crawford County, older adult (61-80 years)
  • Johnson County, elderly adult (81+)
  • Madison County, older adult (61-80 years)

According to IDPH, the locations and age ranges of the 122 individuals include:

  • Allamakee County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Benton County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Black Hawk County, 3 adults (18-40 years), 3 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Bremer County, 1 elderly adult (81+)
  • Buena Vista County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Clayton County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Clinton County, 4 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Dallas County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Delaware County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Henry County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Jefferson County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Johnson County, 7 adults (18-40 years), 2 middle-age adults (41-60 years)
  • Linn County, 2 adults (18-40 years), 3 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 4 older adults (61-80 years), 1 elderly adult (81+)
  • Louisa County, 4 adults (18-40 years), 9 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Madison County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Marion County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Marshall County, 7 adults (18-40 years), 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Muscatine County, 8 adults (18-40 years), 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Polk County, 9 adults (18-40 years), 2 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 5 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Scott County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 5 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 6 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Tama County, 3 adults (18-40 years), 3 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Wapello County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Washington County, 2 adults (18-40 years), 6 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Woodbury County, 3 middle-age adults (41-60 years)
Friday, April 10

8:29 p.m. -- Corrections officer tests positive for COVID-19

The Iowa Department of Corrections announced Friday that a staff member has tested positive for COVID-19. According to a statement from the department, the individual is a correctional officer at the Iowa Medical and Classification Center, often referred to as Oakdale Prison, located in Coralville.

The officer is between the ages of 18 and 40, and is recovering at home after experiencing symptoms between April 8th and 9th. The individual was last at work on April 8th, according to the statement.

“The department has implemented pre-established action steps and procedures for identifying COVID-19 contacts with staff and offenders and quarantining those exposed. The department is taking every appropriate measure to ensure that the impact on staff and inmates can be mitigated as much as possible,” the statement reads in part.

It’s the first known positive case of the disease within Iowa’s prison system, which is considerably overcrowded. As of Friday, DOC statistics show there are 844 people currently held at Oakdale, putting the prison at 44 percent overcapacity. Overall, the state’s prisons are collectively operating at 22.46 percent overcapacity.

The Iowa DOC has turned to incarcerated Iowans themselves to meet the department’s needs for personal protective gear, producing thousands of masks, face shields, and gowns, which are also being sent to other state agencies. 

Correctional facilities across the country are bracing for potential outbreaks of the new coronavirus, which is highly infectious and easily transmitted from person to person, especially in close quarters. Advocates warn that stringent social distancing, which is widely recommended by public health experts, is functionally not possible behind bars, leaving staff and incarcerated people vulnerable to the virus.

3:32 p.m. – Telehealth services now offered by University of Iowa clinic serving low income people and immigrant communities

The UI Mobile Clinic usually brings providers directly to people in need by seeing patients in churches and community centers. Due to the new coronavirus, services are now available over the phone or through video calls.

Joyce Wahba is a UI medical student and a coordinator of the clinic. “So patients are still able to get refills on their chronic medications, they’re able to talk to us about acute symptoms that they have, if they’re worried about any respiratory complaints that are related to COVID or anything like that, we’re able to talk them through what they should do. And all of it’s completely for free.”

Wahba says many mobile clinic patients have no other way to access healthcare, due to a language barrier, lack of transportation or lack of insurance. More information on getting an appointment is available at www.iowamobileclinic.org.

2:04 p.m. - Gov. Reynolds announces shortage order for PPE

Iowa is now requiring healthcare providers to work with the state to assess, monitor and extend the use of protective gear. At a press conference today, state officials announced a personal protective equipment shortage order and are asking health care providers to extend the use of PPE supplies.

The order follows guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to require all health care facilities and local public health organizations to extend their supply of protective equipment.

Sarah Reisetter is the deputy director of the Department of Public Health. She says the state is anticipating a shortage of PPE.

“The order requires these entities decrease demand by maximizing the way barriers and ventilation systems are used,” she said.

Reisetter said this means medical providers could start using face masks beyond their shelf life or expiration date, changing them less frequently and using homemade masks and face shields.

Gov. Kim Reynolds said it comes in response to the shrinking availability of the protective equipment that healthcare workers rely on to reduce the transmission of the virus.

“We were receiving some orders, but as we continue to see those pushed back, we’ve had to reach within the state to help to provide our healthcare workers and first responders the PPE that they need,” Reynolds said.

 12:56 p.m. - State releases more information about new COVID-19 cases 

As of Friday, there are 118 new, confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Iowa for a total of 1,388 cases. Two more Iowans have also died of complications of COVID-19, bringing the death toll in Iowa to 31.

To date, there have been 14,565 negative tests.

New Cases: 118 Confirmed Cases: 1,388 Deaths: 31

According to the Iowa Department of Public Health, the two additional deaths were among Iowans in Linn County:

  • Linn County, 1 older adult (61-80 years), 1 elderly adult (81+) 

According to IDPH, the locations and age ranges of the 118 new cases include:

  • Allamakee County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60)
  • Black Hawk County, 6 adults (18-40 years), 7 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Cedar County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Clarke County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Clayton County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Clinton County, 2 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Dubuque County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Fayette County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Harrison County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Henry County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Jasper County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Johnson County, 1 child (0-17 years), 5 adults (18-40 years), 6 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Linn County, 3 adults (18-40 years), 4 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years), 1 elderly adult (81+)
  • Louisa County, 5 adults (18-40 years), 6 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 3 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Marshall County, 2 adults (41-60 years)
  • Muscatine County, 2 adults (18-40 years), 8 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Osceola County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Polk County, 6 adults (18-40 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Pottawattamie County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Scott County, 3 adults (18-40 years), 6 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years, 1 elderly adult (81+)
  • Tama County, 4 adults (18-40 years), 3 middle-age adults (41-60 years)
  • Union County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Wapello County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Warren County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Washington County, 2 adults (18-40 years), 2 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Winnebago County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Woodbury County, 3 middle-age adults (41-60 years)

11:00 a.m. - Gov. Reynolds hosts daily COVID-19 press conference

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgkT53zcVmk

Jump to see how many new COVID-19 cases there were Thursday, April 9.

Thursday, April 9

7:20 p.m. – Several Sioux City Police Department staff members have tested positive for COVID-19

In a statement Thursday, the Sioux City Police Department said the staff members are recovering in isolation. But it won’t share how many employees are affected, what their roles are, or how old they are.

Sergeant Jeremy McClure says the police department continues to provide essential services for the community and is taking precautions. That includes employees wearing masks while communicating with the public. “Some officers had that option and numerous officers wore masks when interacting with the public, but given that we continue to review our policies and procedures, this time we’re implementing a procedure to wear masks when interacting with the public.”

McClure says police had already been sanitizing vehicles and equipment regularly, frequently washing their hands and social distancing before the department was aware of the positive test results.

4:52 p.m. – Demand for unemployment assistance begins to cut into the state’s unemployment trust fund

Last month, Gov. Kim Reynolds announced employers would not be charged for unemployment claims when the layoffs are caused by COVID-19. But Iowa Workforce Development director Beth Townsend says the state cannot cover those costs indefinitely. If the state’s unemployment fund drops to a certain level, the fees will be reinstated. “That trigger is $950 million. We are currently at about $1.13 billion in our trust fund, so about $180 million away from the trigger.”

Demand for unemployment assistance is not likely to ease up. Over the last three weeks, a total of more than 160,000 workers across the state filed initial jobless claims.

4:46 p.m. – Some university researchers tailor their work to fit current health care needs

With Iowa college and universities closed because of COVID-19, a lot of research has come to a halt. But some researchers have been able to tailor their work to fit with the current needs of health care workers and hospitals.

David Cwiertny’s students typically make filtration devices to take pollutants out of drinking water. But a University of Iowa official reached out to see if they could adapt the research to fit with the current crisis. Cwiertny says anyone who does research looks for ways that their work can help society. “I think that’s what we’re trying to do here. If there’s an opportunity for us to contribute our expertise and help, rather than just sitting on the sidelines, when we would take that opportunity to see what we can do.

Two of Cwiertny’s graduate students have shifted to creating air filters that could go into personal protective equipment like masks. This could better safeguard health care workers from breathing in aerosol particles that may carry the virus. Cwiertny says normally he’d have about a dozen people in the lab, but now there’s just two, to take proper precautions against COVID-19.

Madeline Jensen is a University of Iowa graduate student studying sustainable water development. Usually her research focuses on chemical compounds known as PFAS, but that research isn’t considered critical right now.

But after a university official approached her lab, Jensen has been one of two students working to create air filters that could go into personal protective equipment like masks. This could safeguard health care workers. Jensen says she may need to tweak her thesis for her dissertation a little. She has a year and a half before she defends her dissertation.

4:41 p.m. – A Linn County employee has tested positive for COVID-19

Local officials said Thursday that they could not elaborate on how many other county employees may have been exposed to the person, but said based on their job, the individual had minimal contact with other staffers.

County Supervisor Stacey Walker expressed his support for the person, who he said is expected to recover. “This hit close to home for us. This employee was one of our own, a public servant. And this incident further underscores even for us the seriousness of this pandemic.”

Walker says the building the individual worked in has been thoroughly cleaned according to standards set by federal infectious disease experts. He said the building has been restricted to the public for three weeks, and the individual hasn’t been inside since April 2.

4:21 p.m. – Top lawmakers have voted to continue the suspension of Iowa’s legislative session until April 30

When they suspended the session in mid-March because of COVID-19, lawmakers were planning to come back April 15. At the time, they voted to fund state government at current levels through August in case the suspension goes longer.

Senate Republican Leader Jack Whitver says they’ll have to put together a budget when they return to the Capitol, but there’s a lot of uncertainty. He says first they’re trying to figure out what they can use incoming federal relief money for. “The second thing is what kind of shape our state revenues are gonna be in when we come back. And as of right now that is an impossible question to answer based on the fact a large part of our economy is shut down right now.”

The legislative council can extend or shorten the suspension.

3:49 p.m. – John Deere’s Moline, Illinois factory plans to make more than 200,000 face shields

One of the world’s most recognizable tractor brands is pitching in to help supply healthcare workers with personal protective equipment. John Deere announced Thursday that its Moline, Illinois factory had started producing face shields. Initially, Deere prepared to make 25,000 face shields. Deere’s David Ottavianelli says they now have the materials to make 225,000.

Ottavianelli says during the coronavirus pandemic, employees in many different locations were having frequent conversations with local healthcare providers. 

Moline’s factory manager, Brad Russmann, says they’re using an open-source design that meets the needs of the medical community. He says the company’s diverse expertise and commitment to the project made for a quick turnaround. “We’ve been able to leverage the capability of our workforce and our factory, both our maintenance and production employees, to ultimately turn an idea into a reality in a matter of days.”

The face shields will be sent to Deere factories around the country, which will distribute them to local healthcare workers.

 3:03 p.m. – Southeast Iowa newspaper uses social media to reach readers after staffer tests positive for COVID-19

A southeast Iowa publishing company says it won’t be distributing six of its local newspapers this week due to the new coronavirus. The Louisa Publishing Company made the announcement on social media, saying a part-time employee had tested positive for COVID-19.

One of the company’s key coverage areas is Louisa County, which currently has one of the highest infection rates in the state, after an outbreak at a Tyson meatpacking plant.

The publisher says it will be posting its stories to social media, in the hopes that readers can get their local news there.

2:18 p.m. – Infectious disease experts don't see evidence of a flattening curve

A top state public health official says Iowa is starting to flatten the curve of COVID-19 cases. But some infectious disease experts don’t see the rate of infection slowing. 

The goal of social distancing is to flatten the curve and avoid overwhelming hospitals. Public Health department deputy director Sarah Reisetter says it’s starting to work in Iowa and the curve is starting to flatten.

But two infectious disease experts who spoke with IPR say they don’t see evidence of this. Eli Perencevich is an internal medicine and epidemiology professor at the University of Iowa.  

“We still don’t have evidence with the case counts that the curve is flattening. And it’s concerning the number of tests we’re sending has been increasing, but the percent of those that are positive has also been increasing.”

On Thursday Iowa saw its biggest single-day jump in COVID-19 cases and two more deaths. And Perencevich points to estimates that only about 10 percent of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. are being counted because testing is still limited.

 1:50 p.m. – State receives rapid-testing machines

The Iowa State Hygienic Laboratory has received 15 rapid-testing machines that can complete a test for COVID-19 in five minutes. A normal test at the lab takes 24 hours.

Sarah Reisetter, deputy director of the Department of Public Health, says one plan is to use the devices in long-term care centers to test workers and residents who were exposed to the virus.

“That seems to be an ideal place where we could deploy one of these machines, do some rapid testing and get some rapid results,” she says.

Governor Kim Reynolds says the state’s initial supply of testing materials is limited, but more shipments are expected as soon as Friday.

1:10 p.m. – Iowa sees largest single day increase in the number of COVID-19 cases

The Iowa Department of Public Health has identified 125 new, confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Iowa, and two more Iowans have died. 

That brings the total number of confirmed positive cases of the disease in the state to 1,270 in 79 Iowa counties. A total of 29 Iowans have died since the first case of the disease was confirmed in the state just over a month ago. 

New Cases: 125 Confirmed Cases: 1,270 Deaths: 29

According to IDPH, the two additional deaths were among:

  • Linn County, 1 older adult (61-80 years), 1 elderly adult (81+) 

According to IDPH, the locations and age ranges of the 125 new cases include:

  • Benton County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 2 middle age adults (41-60 years) 
  • Black Hawk County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 middle age adult (41-60 years) 
  • Boone County, 1 middle age adults (41-60 years) 
  • Buchanan County, 1 middle age adult (41-60 years) 
  • Cedar County, 1 middle age adults (41-60 years) 
  • Cerro Gordo County, 1 middle age adult (41-60 years) 
  • Chickasaw County, 1 middle age adults (41-60 years) 
  • Clinton County, 1 child (0-17 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Dallas County, 1 middle age adult (41-60 years) 
  • Dubuque County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 2 middle age adults (41-60 years) 
  • Iowa County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Jasper County, 1 middle age adult (41-60 years) 
  • Johnson County, 8 adults (18-40 years), 12 middle age adults (41-60 years), 4 older adults (61-80 years) 
  • Jones County, 2 middle age adults (41-60 years) 
  • Linn County, 1 child (0-17 years), 7 adults (18-40 years), 6 middle age adults (41-60 years), 3 older adults (61-80), 1 elderly adult (81+)  
  • Louisa County, 4 adults (18-40 years), 6 middle age adults (41-60 years), 1 elderly adult (81+)  
  • Marshall County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 middle age adult (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years) 
  • Muscatine County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 6 middle age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years), 1 elderly adult (81+)
  • Polk County, 2 adults (18-40 years), 3 middle age adults (41-60 years),  1 older adult (61-80 years) 
  • Scott County, 1 child (0-17 years), 6 adults (18-40 years), 2 middle age adults (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Story County, 1 middle age adult (41-60 years) 
  • Tama County, 3 adults (18-40 years), 9 middle age adults (41-60 years), 3 older adults (61-80 years), 2 elderly adults (81+)
  • Washington County, 2  middle age adults (41-60 years), 1 elderly adult (81+) 
  • Winneshiek County, 1 middle age adult (41-60 years) 
  • Woodbury County, 1 adult (18-40 years)

11:00 a.m. - Gov. Reynolds hosts daily COVID-19 press conference 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=soDKdNiquxU

8:57 a.m. – Iowa weekly jobless claim filings continues sharp increase

The number of Iowa workers filing jobless claims continues to grow sharply as the state closes more businesses as part of the response to COVID-19.

Last week, 67,334 Iowa workers filed for unemployment assistance with Iowa Workforce Development. Over the past three weeks the total number of claims is 167,677.

Broken down by industry, health and social assistance workers topped the list followed closely by manufacturing and retail:

  • Health Care and Social Assistance (9,632)
  • Manufacturing (9,218)
  • Retail Trade (8,088)
  • Accommodation and Food Services (7,123)
  • Construction (2,696)
Wednesday, April 8

9:05 p.m. – Des Moines Community School District prepares for distance learning through the end of the school year

Des Moines Public Schools plans to make online learning mandatory for seniors as soon as next week, followed by the other high school grades the week after.

The challenge is connecting them all. Superintendent Thomas Ahart estimates around 7,000 of the district’s nearly 33,000 students don’t have home Internet. But he says students need to connect with teachers to keep from losing what they’ve learned. “Anyone who thinks that we can have students away from school as they are accustomed to and away from their teachers and that learning loss isn’t going to happen are absolutely kidding themselves.”

The current school shutdown goes at least through April 30, but Ahart says Des Moines will use distance learning for the rest of the school year.

9:05 p.m. – Iowa schools complete planning for continuous teaching while classrooms remain closed

Friday is the deadline for schools to tell the Iowa Department of Education what kind of distance learning they will provide for students during the COVID-19 shutdown.

School districts can follow a voluntary option and make lessons available for families that want them, or schools can make distance learning mandatory. Mike Beranek, president of the Iowa State Education Association, says that means teachers must take attendance and grade students’ work. “They would be providing the rigorous content covered during a regular school day. And that information, that content, has to be accessible by all children.”

The Department of Education says schools with no distance learning will have to make up for that time at the end of the year.

5:21 p.m. – Iowa Democratic Party county conventions to be held entirely remotely

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders suspended his campaign Wednesday, bowing out of the race two months after winning the most individual supporters in the Iowa caucuses. A lot has changed since the first-in-the-nation contest and now the IDP says its convention process is changing too.

The party’s county conventions will all be held remotely. Precinct delegates will choose their district and state delegates by casting ballots online, over the phone or by mail.

Those elections will take place from April 22 through 30.

The national Democratic Party previously announced it would be delaying its convention until August.

4:36 p.m. – Two senior living facilities in Johnson County are reporting cases of COVID-19

Legacy Dial Senior Living in Iowa City confirmed one staff member has tested positive for COVID-19.

Additionally, according to a company website, Bickford Senior Living in Iowa City currently has two confirmed cases. The organization did not respond to requests for comment.

State officials are not counting the facilities among their list of COVID-19 outbreaks at long-term care centers. The state is defining an outbreak as three or more confirmed cases among residents.

3:58 p.m. – Marshalltown Iowa Veterans Home staff test positive for COVID-19

Three staff members at the 500-bed Iowa Veterans Home in Marshalltown have tested positive for COVID-19, and results are pending for three others.

The head of a union representing some state employees says veterans home staff who worked with an infected employee were told to keep coming to work.

Gov. Kim Reynolds says 25 residents were tested and none were positive. She says the veterans home has been proactive in restricting visitors, screening staff for coronavirus symptoms, and isolating those who tested positive.

But state officials don’t consider this a long-term care facility outbreak. The state’s own threshold requires three residents to test positive in a facility to call it an outbreak. State officials have confirmed three such outbreaks, but cases have been found at additional facilities.

3:22 p.m.  – Iowa arts and culture emergency relief resources announced  

The National Endowment for the Arts announced today that it will distribute 40 percent of the $75 million allocated through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act directly to state and regional arts agencies by April 30.

According to Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs Director Chris Kramer that translates to a total of $442,700 that will be distributed in the form of operating support grants to Iowa organizations. 

Kramer says the arts and cultural sector is a more than $4 billion industry in the state.

We are going to be making grants of $1,000 for individual artists and individual arts workers, as well as $2,500 for individual non-profits. - David Schmitz of the Iowa Arts Council

“25,000 Iowans work directly in 5,000 arts and cultural businesses. These are small businesses and non-profits. When you expand that to include innovation and design, that numbers grows to more than 72,000 Iowans,” she says.

Iowans who are self-employed in the creative sector have not yet been able to apply for state COVID-19 unemployment benefits, but as we’ve previously reported, there are some resources available.

In addition to the money for operating expenses, the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs announced an arts and culture emergency relief fund for individual artists. 

“We are going to be making grants of $1,000 for individual artists and individual arts workers, as well as $2,500 for individual non-profits,” David Schmitz, an administrator for the Iowa Arts Council, said.

The first funding round for the emergency relief grants for individual artists will open on April 13. Learn more from the webinar the IDCA hosted today.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykaif1mvsnc&feature=youtu.be  

3:41 p.m. - Gov. Reynolds declares 'Day Of Prayer' in Iowa

Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds proclaimed Thursday, April 9 a “day of prayer” in the state and is urging Iowans to “unite in prayer” during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The power of prayer and faith in God is something that has guided so many of us in good times and bad,” said Reynolds in an email. “We have all been impacted by COVID-19. Some of us have lost a loved one and others know those who are sick. Whether you are a nurse on the frontlines fighting the pandemic, a grocery store worker, the truck driver making a delivery, or someone laid off at home, this has been a challenging and stressful time. Let us join together and pray for our neighbors, communities and state.”

Thursday marks the beginning of the Jewish festival of Passover and is the Christian holy day of Maundy Thursday which precedes Easter on Sunday. 

Thursday is also the 59th annual Iowa Prayer Breakfast, which is being offered entirely online this year.

2:19 p.m. – State officials expand Iowa’s short-term small business relief program from $4 to $24 million

The state announced about two weeks ago that it was taking applications for small business grants of $5,000 to $25,000 as a stopgap measure until federal help arrives.

Governor Kim Reynolds says the state received nearly 14,000 applications requesting more than $148 million in assistance. She’s using state economic emergency funds and her transfer authority to cover $24 million worth of those requests.

Iowa Economic Development Authority Director Debbie Durham says every application was triaged. “Triage actually describes this entire effort and this entire process. We determined eligibility and the businesses identifying the greatest revenue disruption were awarded in this first round of funding.”  

Durham says about 500 businesses were notified they’ll get grants, and there are more to come. But Durham says the state won’t allow for new applicants.

12:06 p.m. - Additional 97 positive COVID-19 cases announced; 1 additional death
The Iowa Department of Public Health has been notified of 97 additional positive cases for a total of 1,145 positive cases. There have been an additional 1,151 negative tests for a total of 12,821 negative tests to date, which includes testing reported by the State Hygienic Lab and other labs. 

According to IDPH, an additional death was also reported: 

  • Linn County, 1 elderly adult (81+)
New Cases: 97 Confirmed Cases: 1,145 Deaths: 27

According to IDPH, the locations and age ranges of the 97 individuals include:

  • Allamakee County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Benton County, 1 child (0-17 years)
  • Black Hawk County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 3 middle-age adults (41-60 years)
  • Cedar County, 3 adults (18-40 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Clinton County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Crawford County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Harrison County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Henry County, 2 adults (18-40 years)
  • Johnson County, 10 adults (18-40 years), 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years), 2 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Linn County, 1 child (0-17 years), 4 adults (18-40 years), 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years), 3 older adults (61-80 years), 2 elderly adults (81+)
  • Louisa County, 4 adults (18-40 years), 5 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Marshall County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Muscatine County, 4 adults (18-40 years), 5 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Polk County, 2 adults (18-40 years), 4 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Pottawattamie County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Scott County, 4 adults (18-40 years), 7 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Tama County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Warren County, 1 elderly adult (81+)
  • Washington County, 3 adults (18-40 years), 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Webster County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Woodbury County, 2 middle-age adults (41-60 years)
  • Worth County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)

11:00 a.m. - Watch Gov. Reynolds daily COVID-19 press briefing    

https://youtu.be/xnfe5a9OdyE

Tuesday, April 7

5:52 p.m. – University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics plans to use converted anesthesiology machines as ventilators for COVID-19 patients

Theresa Brennan, Chief Medical Officer at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, said Tuesday that the hospital has enough ventilators to care for the surge of COVID-19 patients it’s expecting. But that means relying on converted anesthesiology machines: “We feel that we have enough ventilators with those that we’ve ordered, those that we’ve received from the state and those that we’ve converted from anesthesia machines to take care of those patients.”

It’s a step that providers across the country are taking as more patients become very sick and supplies run low.

4:58 p.m. - Some food pantries adjust for COVID-19 

Some Iowa food banks and pantries are changing the way they operate to help people get access to food.

Northeast Iowa Food Bank in Waterloo packs boxes with frozen and non-perishable food and distributes that to local pantries. 

Executive Director Barb Prather says people drive up to the pantry and give their name, address and the number of people in their household.

“Everybody gets a nonperishable box that weighs about 36 to 40 pounds and then a perishable box that weighs similar. And then we put that directly in their car after we’ve taken their registration. They don’t have to sign anything,” she says.

Prather says before the food bank shifted its operations because of COVID-19, families could come to the on-site pantry and choose what food they wanted. Northeast Iowa Food Bank also has trucks driving out to communities serving as mobile pantries. Staff are adding more, based on the need.

2:31 p.m. - Major ethanol company halts production at three locations

POET, a major ethanol company, has announced it is halting production at three locations and delaying the opening of a fourth. With people not driving, demand for gasoline, and therefore ethanol, has plummeted. Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley says government purchases will help the oil industry. He wants something similar for ethanol.

2:06 p.m. - Snowbirds making touch decisions amid pandemic

Some retired Iowans who spend part of their time in Florida are having to make tough decisions about how to protect themselves from the new coronavirus.

Florida’s governor had been reluctant to shut down the tourism industry, and the state has seen a spike in COVID-19 cases.

Steve Reno of Altoona says he and his wife left their second home in southwest Florida earlier than they planned out of concern over the virus.

“Many people saw the pictures of the beaches that I live near, between St. Petersburg and Clearwater, packed with Spring Breakers. It took the government quite a while to even realize this was not a smart thing to be doing,” he says.

Iowa officials are urging anyone entering the state to self-isolate for two weeks. The elderly and those with underlying health conditions can be even more vulnerable to COVID-19.

1:46 p.m. - 23% of COVID-19 cases in Iowa are among healthcare workers

Iowa officials are reporting that about 23 percent of COVID-19 cases are healthcare workers.

They are also declining to release a breakdown of cases along racial lines. States such as Minnesota, Michigan and Illinois have released race-specific data on their confirmed COVID-19 cases.

But as a press conference on Tuesday, state Department of Public Health Deputy Director Sarah Reisetter said the state will not be releasing that data for Iowa’s cases.

“At this point in time the way that the information is collected by the department, and we don't have statistics that I think we would consider to be accurate and complete related to some of that race and ethnicity information,” she said.

Reisetter said the department may be able to release some racial information when it does its investigation report at the end of the COVID-19 outbreak.

12:02 p.m. - Iowa Department of Public Health announces more than 1,000 cases of coronavirus in Iowa

At an 11:00 a.m. press conference, Gov. Kim Reynolds announced 102 new, confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the state for a total of 1048 cases in 78 Iowa counties. 

State officials are also reporting one more death. The Iowan who died yesterday of the virus was an elderly adult older than 81 from Benton County. 

New Cases: 102 Confirmed Cases: 1048 Deaths: 26

According to IDPH, the locations and age ranges of the 102 new individuals who are COVID-19 positive include:

  • Benton County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Black Hawk County, 3 adults (18-40 years)
  • Buena Vista County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Delaware County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Des Moines County, 2 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Dubuque County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 middle age (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Greene County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Hamilton County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Henry County, 1 child (0-17 years), 1 adult (18-40 years), 2 middle-age adults (41-60 years)
  • Johnson County, 10 adults (18-40 years), 4 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years), 1 elderly adult (81+)
  • Linn County, 4 adults (18-40 years), 5 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Louisa County, 7 adults (18-40 years), 3 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 3 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Mahaska County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Marion County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Marshall County, 2 adults (18-40 years)
  • Muscatine County, 2 children (0-17 years), 3 adults (18-40 years), 3 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Polk County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Pottawattamie County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Scott County, 6 adults (18-40 years), 5 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 3 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Story County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Tama County, 3 older adults (61-80 years), 3 elderly (81+)
  • Warren County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Washington County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years), 1 elderly (81+)
  • Woodbury County, 1 adult (18-40 years)

11:00 a.m. - Watch Gov. Reynolds daily COVID-19 press briefing  

https://youtu.be/5HFvXuQ8CNs

Monday, April 6

6:17 p.m. - Linn county patients "fighting for their lives"

Health care officials in the Iowa county with the most confirmed cases of COVID-19 say some patients are “fighting for their lives,” and that some of the seriously ill include patients who were relatively young and healthy.

Linn County currently has more documented cases of COVID-19 than any other county in the state. At a Monday press conference, health officials reiterated that younger, healthier people are not immune to the disease.

A top official at Mercy Medical Center in Cedar Rapids said that as of Monday, the majority of patients on ventilators at the hospital due to the new coronavirus are under the age of 65.

The fact of the matter is, we talk about susceptible populations, but this is hitting people that aren't necessarily elderly and aren't necessarily having lots of other medical problems. - Tony Myers, vice president of medical affairs at Mercy Medical Center in Cedar Rapids

“We’ve all seen what’s going on, on TV and in social media, but this is going on right now in Cedar Rapids. It’s here,” said Tony Myers, the vice president of medical affairs at the Cedar Rapids hospital.

He wore a facemask as he addressed reporters, warning that those who fall ill are not limited to people with underlying conditions like cancer, heart or lung disease, high blood pressure or diabetes.

“The fact of the matter is, we talk about susceptible populations, but this is hitting people that aren’t necessarily elderly and aren’t necessarily having lots of other medical problems.”

Still, those who are elderly or who have other health conditions can be very vulnerable. As of Monday, more than 70 of Linn County’s cases are linked to patients and staff at a local nursing home.

Because there is relatively little known about the respiratory disease, clinicians have few treatment options. Currently there are no FDA-approved treatments specifically for COVID-19. Myers said that some experimental treatments have not been very effective at his hospital. The best way to handle the disease, he said, is to never get the virus in the first place.

“The only thing that we know that will work is for people to not get it,” he said. “And the only way that that’s going to happen is we do what we’ve been talking about for weeks: we wash our hands, we stay in.

5:55 p.m. -  National infectious disease doctor says Iowa 'functionally' has a stay-at-home order in place 

The federal government's top infectious disease expert said Iowa's restrictions to lessen the spread of COVID-19 are "functionally equivalent" to a stay-at-home order.

Iowa and Nebraska are two of a handful of states that have not issued a formal stay-at-home order.

Dr. Anthony Fauci said at Monday's White House news conference that he talked to Gov. Kim Reynolds and Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts. Fauci said they are "doing a very good job."

"I want to make sure people understand that just because they don't have a very strict stay-at-home order, they have in place a lot of things that are totally compatible with what everyone else is doing," Fauci said.

Some medical groups in Iowa have called on Reynolds to issue a formal order because they worry not enough Iowans are understanding that they need to stay home and away from others to prevent spreading the virus. 

3:30 p.m. - Iowa officials release updated map showing COVID-19 hotspots

0406-6RegionMap.png
Credit Iowa Department of Public Health

Iowa health officials have released an updated map of the six-region system that guides their decisions about COVID-19 mitigation strategies. The regions on Monday have rankings between 6 and 9.

Ranking are determined by individuals over 65, number of infections per 100,000 people and number of outbreaks at long-term care facilities. According to documents first obtained by the Iowa City Press-Citizen, a score of 10 is needed for Gov. Reynolds to issue a stay-at-home order.

Last Thursday when officials released the first map, regions all ranked between 5 and 7.

Since last Thursday, officials have announced more than 300 new confirmed cases of the virus, including 13 deaths, and confirmed two more outbreaks at long-term care facilities in Tama and Washington counties.

3:01 p.m. - Gov. Reynolds talks with Dr. Anthony Fauci, the federal government’s top infectious disease expert

Governor Kim Reynolds says she had a phone call Monday with Dr. Anthony Fauci, the federal government’s top infectious disease expert.

She says Fauci, quote, “was 100 percent supportive, saying that Iowa and Nebraska are on the same page with guidance he’s providing other states.”

Reynolds said Friday that Fauci possibly didn’t have all the information about Iowa’s COVID-19 mitigation efforts.

Last week, Fauci said on CNN he doesn’t understand why all states don’t have formal shelter-in-place orders.

Iowa is one of a handful of states without a formal order. 

2:13 p.m. - Columbus Junction Tyson closes due to COVID-19

A slaughterhouse in Columbus Junction won’t be packing any pork this week. In a statement, Tyson Foods said its packing plant will be closed because more than two dozen workers there have tested positive for COVID-19. The company says it will divert hogs to other plants in the region.

The closure is a more serious interruption than earlier ones caused by the pandemic, such as increased workplace safety measures and employee absences, which Tyson says had already had some impact on production. A Tyson spokesperson did not immediately return a call requesting comment.

1:30 p.m. - State urges Iowans to stay home predicting a "difficult" week ahead

Top state officials are urging all Iowans to stay home and practice social distancing as confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths continue to increase.

We do expect to continue to see our case counts rise as well as the number of deaths we have in Iowa rise over the next week. - Sarah Reisetter, deputy director of the Iowa Department of Public Health

Sarah Reisetter is the deputy director of the Iowa Department of Public Health. She says staying home is the best way to avoid spreading or getting the virus.

“We do expect to continue to see our case counts rise as well as the number of deaths we have in Iowa rise over the next week. I think we heard the surgeon general say yesterday that this is going to be a difficult week for our entire country. And so we expect it to also be a difficult week in Iowa,” Reisetter said.

The state is reporting 25 Iowans have died of COVID-19. Reisetter says the state expects deaths to peak in a week or two, but the state hasn’t released details about their projections. A model from the University of Washington is now predicting 420 deaths in Iowa by summer.

12:57 p.m. - Police given guidance to enforce statewide gathering ban

Police will be given guidance this week on how to enforce the statewide ban on gatherings of more than 10 people to slow the spread of COVID-19. Stephan Bayens, the commissioner of the Iowa Department of Public Safety, says misdemeanor charges are possible if people ignore warnings.

“Law enforcement is asking Iowans to take their responsibility seriously and police themselves, so we can conserve our law enforcement resources for those who truly need it,” Bayens said.

11:53 a.m. - Governor signs new State Public Health Emergency Declaration ordering additional closures

At an 11:00 a.m. press conference Monday, Gov. Kim Reynolds ordered additional closures to help slow the spread of the coronavirus. 

To encourage further social distancing and mitigation efforts, Reynolds ordered closures of the following establishments effective at 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday, April 7 until Thursday, April 30 says more businesses could still be added to the closure list:

  • Malls 
  • Tobacco or vaping stores
  • Toy, gaming, music, instrument, movie, or adult entertainment stores
  • Social and fraternal clubs, including those at golf courses
  • Bingo halls, bowling alleys, pool halls, arcades, and amusement parks
  • Museums, libraries, aquariums, and zoos
  • Race tracks and speedway
  • Roller or ice skating rinks and skate parks
  • Outdoor or indoor playgrounds or children’s play centers
  • Campgrounds
  • In addition, all unsolicited door-to-door sales are prohibited.
  • The following establishments and behaviors that are already prohibited:
  • Mass gatherings as outlined in the proclamation below
  • Restaurants and bars limited to carry out.
  • Fitness centers
  • Swimming pools
  • Salons: All salons, including all establishments providing the services of cosmetology, electrology, esthetics, nail technology, manicuring, and pedicuring, all as defined in Iowa Code § 157.1, shall continue to be closed.
  • Medical spas
  • Barbershops
  • Tattoo establishments
  • Tanning facilities
  • Massage therapy establishments
  • Theaters: All theaters or other performance venues at which live performances or motion pictures are shown shall continue to be closed.
  • Casinos and gaming facilities
  • Other nonessential retail establishments outlined in the proclamation: Bookstores; clothing stores; shoe stores; jewelry stores; luggage stores; cosmetic, beauty, or perfume stores; florists; and furniture and home furnishing stores shall continue to be closed. These establishments may still serve the public through online or telephone sales, delivery, or curb-side pick-up. This closure order does not affect other retail establishments, such as discount stores, grocery stores, or pharmacies that sell these goods in addition to other essential food, medical supplies, and household goods.
    Senior citizen centers and adult daycare facilities:  All facilities that conduct adult day services or other senior citizen centers are hereby closed.
  • Social, community, spiritual, religious, recreational, leisure, and sporting gatherings and events of more than 10 people are hereby prohibited at all locations and venues, including but not limited to parades, festivals, conventions, and fundraisers
  • Livestock auctions of food animals with more than 25 people and all other auctions with more than 10 people are prohibited.

11:45 a.m. - 78 new COVID-19 cases, 3 more deaths announced

The state announced 78 new, confirmed cases of COVID-19 at a press conference at 11:00 a.m. this morning, and three more deaths. There are now a total of 946 confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus in 75 Iowa counties. There have been 10,653 negative tests to date.

New Cases: 78 Confirmed Cases: 946 Deaths: 25

There are 99 Iowans currently hospitalized for the virus, and 284 Iowans have recovered.

According to IDPH, the three deaths reported were among adults in: 

  • Linn County, 1 older adult (61-80 years) 
  • Tama County, 2 elderly adults (81+)

According to IDPH, the locations and age ranges of the 78 new COVID-19 cases include:

  • Allamakee County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Benton County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Cedar County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Cerro Gordo County, 2 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Chickasaw County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Clinton County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Crawford County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Dubuque County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Franklin County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Henry County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Jackson County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Johnson County, 5 adults (18-40 years), 6 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Linn County, 5 adults (18-40 years), 6 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years), 1 elderly adult (81+)
  • Louisa County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Marion County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Marshall County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Muscatine County, 5 adults (18-40 years), 2 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Page County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Polk County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Pottawattamie County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Scott County, 2 adults (18-40 years), 7 middle age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80), 1 elderly adult (81+)  
  • Tama County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 middle age adult (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80), 3 elderly adults (81+) 
  • Wapello County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Warren County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Washington County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 middle age adult (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80)  
  • Winnebago County, 1 middle age adult (41-60 years) 

11:00 a.m. - Gov. Reynolds hosts press conference from the State Emergency Operations Center in Johnston 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOe4pvSnTLM

Sunday, April 5

1:13 p.m. - 83 new COVID-19 cases confirmed; 8 more deaths

The state has announced 83 new positive cases, bringing the total of confirmed coronavirus cases to 868.

New Cases: 83 Confirmed Cases: 868 Deaths: 22

An additional eight deaths were also reported: 

  • Appanoose County, 1 elderly adult (81+) 
  • Johnson County, 1 older adult (61-80 years) 
  • Polk County, 2 older adults (61-80 years), 1 elderly adult (81+) 
  • Linn County, 1 elderly adult (81+) 
  • Scott County, 1 elderly adult (81+) 
  • Washington County, 1 older adult (61-80 years) 

The total deaths in Iowa attributed to COVID-19 now stands at 22.
There have been an additional 519 negative tests for a total of 9,973 negative tests to date. 

More than 10% of all positive cases in Iowa are occurring among long term care staff and residents. More than 40% of all deaths in Iowa are associated with outbreaks in long-term care facilities. This statistic underscores that COVID-19 poses the most risk for older adults above the age of 60 with chronic health conditions, resulting in more severe illness and death.    

According to IDPH, the locations and age ranges of the individuals with the new cases Sunday include:

  • Allamakee County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Benton County, 2 middle-age (41-60 years)
  • Black Hawk, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 middle-age (41-60 years)
  • Boone County, 1 middle-age (41-60)
  • Buchanan County, 2 adults (18-40 years)
  • Cedar County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Clarke County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Clayton County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Clinton County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Dallas County, 1 adult (18-40 years), 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Hamilton County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Henry County, 2 elderly adults (81+)
  • Johnson County, 7 adults (18-40 years), 3 middle-age adults (41-60 years)
  • Jones County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Linn County***, 3 adults (18-40 years), 8 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 4 older adults (61-80 years), 7 elderly adults (81+),
  • Louisa County, 1 elderly adult (81+), 4 middle-age adults (41-60 years)
  • Muscatine County, 2 adults (18-40 years), 3 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Plymouth County, 1 adult (18-40 years)
  • Polk County, 3 adults (18-40 years), 8 middle-age adults (41-60 years), 2 older adults (61-80 years)
  • Scott County, 3 adults (18-40 years)
  • Shelby County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Tama County, 1 older adult (61-80 years)
  • Warren County, 1 middle-age adult (41-60 years)
  • Washington County, 2 middle-age adults (41-60 years)

***70 of Linn County’s 161 positive cases (43%) can be attributed to an outbreak at a long-term care facility. 

Gov. Reynolds will hold a press conference Monday, April 6, at 11:00 a.m. The press conference will available on Iowa Public Radio’s website. 

The big news carrying forward from March 29 - April 4:

  • 786 confirmed cases of COVID-19
  • 14 deaths attributed to COVID-19
  • Gov. Kim Reynolds continues to say that public health data does not yet call for a stay-at-home order
  • Gov. Reynolds signed a new proclamation continuing the State Public Health Emergency Declaration through through April 30, effectively:
  1. Continuing closures of schools
  2. Continuing closures and limits placed on bars and restaurants and previously identified retail stores
  3. Prohibits social gatherings of more than ten people, and
  4. Continuing to ban nonessential and elective surgeries 
  • The Iowa legislature extended its suspension of the spring session
  • Iowa jobless claims increased by more than 58,000 for a total of 100,000 new claims over two weeks
  • An increasing number of clinics are adopting curbside and drive-thru testing for COVID-19
  • At least 6 long-term care facilities experience community spread of COVID-19
  • Adventureland delays its opening date and the Principal Charity Classic is postponed
  • The 2020 80/35 summer music festival in Des Moines was canceled