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Electronic Exotica: Alpert and Mendes, Remixed

Sergio Mendes on the cover of <em>The Swinger from Rio</em>, left, and his new <em>Timeless</em>.
Sergio Mendes on the cover of The Swinger from Rio, left, and his new Timeless.
Will.i.am of the Black Eyed Peas, left, and Sergio Mendes at the NPR West studios in Culver City, Calif.
David Banks, NPR /
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Will.i.am of the Black Eyed Peas, left, and Sergio Mendes at the NPR West studios in Culver City, Calif.

Herb Alpert and Sergio Mendes, long associated with the carefree pop music of the 1960s, are back in the public eye.

Alpert broke into pop consciousness with his band the Tijuana Brass, with hits such as "Spanish Flea" and "A Taste of Honey." Among others, his 1965 album Whipped Cream and Other Delights, found its way into millions of American homes.

Forty years after helping add exotica to the American music scene, Alpert has collaborated with heavyweights of electronic music for a disc of remixed versions of his songs. The new album is called Rewhipped.

Sergio Mendes, Alpert's Brazilian colleague, is following a similar path with will.i.am, of the pop-rap group the Black Eyed Peas. The pair have updated hits by Mendes' group Brazil 66 for the CD Timeless.

Do the remixes work? Let's just say there are mixed results.

In addition to will.i.am, Mendes worked with Stevie Wonder, India.Arie and Jill Scott, among others. The songs range from old classics like "Mas Que Nada" to the new "Please Baby Don't," written and sung by John Legend.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Tom Moon has been writing about pop, rock, jazz, blues, hip-hop and the music of the world since 1983.