Politics

Emily Woodbury

On this edition of “Pints and Politics,” presented by The Gazette and Iowa Public Radio, panelists provide insight on the allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct in high school, look toward Iowa’s congressional and gubernatorial races, and discuss Gov. Kim Reynolds’ handling of former Iowa Finance Authority director, David Jamison’s, conduct.

 

Thomas Langdon / University of Iowa

NPR's Cokie Roberts says instead of draining the "swamp," as politicians describe our nation's capitol, more members of Congress should bring their families when they come to serve. Roberts grew up in Washington D.C., the daughter of democratic Representative Hale Boggs, who served in the U.S. House for 28 years, and Representative Lindy Boggs, who held her husband's seat for 18 years after his death.

Gage Skidmore/flickr

 

Like “a knife fight in a brawl” – that’s how Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell describes the close Senate midterm races.

 

On this politics day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer and guests Wayne Moyer, Rosenfield Professor and professor of political science at Grinnell College, and Scott Peters, professor and department head at the University of Northern Iowa’s Department of Political Science, take stock with just over 50 days remaining before the midterm election.

 

grassley town hall
Katarina Sostaric/IPR

Sen. Chuck Grassley finished his annual 99-county tour Monday with a contentious town hall-style meeting in Osceola. Some Iowans pressed Grassley to justify his handling of the Supreme Court confirmation process, while others thanked him for his work during last week’s hearings.

A man from Martensdale asked if Grassley would slow down the confirmation process until allegations that nominee Brett Kavanaugh committed perjury are resolved.

Fibonacci Blue

 

 

A recent New York Times investigation revealed possible changes to the way sexual misconduct is handled on college campuses across the country.

 

Gage Skidmore

Today is the first of four days of funeral services for Senator John McCain.

On this edition of politics day on River to River, Ben Kieffer talks with political analysts, Evan Renfro of the University of Northern Iowa and Tim Hagle of the University of Iowa, about the Arizona senator’s legacy.

As a former Air Force intelligence analyst, Renfro also discusses Russia’s planned war games, the largest since the Cold War with the Soviet Union, and the controversy over the revoking of security clearances by the Trump Administration.

Phil Roeder

All beliefs and all actions are political. And often, inaction is just as political.

That’s according to Jeanne Dyches, assistant professor of education at Iowa State University, whose research centers around the idea of how teachers bring their political beliefs into the classroom.

“There is absolutely no way for a teacher not to bring his or her politics to the classroom,” she says.

John Pemble

This week, the murder of University of Iowa student Mollie Tibbetts by a man who is believed to be an undocumented immigrant left the political landscape sharply divided.

On this News Buzz edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks to Chris Larimer, professor of political science at the University of Northern Iowa, about the response to the Tibbetts case by politicians from Iowa and across the nation, including Senator Ernst’s call to reconsider “Sarah’s law."

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While negotiations for the 2018 Farm Bill get underway in the Conference Committee, the trade war with China wages on.

 

On this episode of River to River, Neil Hamilton, Director of the Drake Agricultural Law Center, and Amy Meyer, Reporter for Iowa Public Radio and Harvest Public Media discuss the inner-workings and implications of the Farm Bill, which is set to expire in its current state at the end of September.

 

Shane T. McCoy / Wikimedia Commons

 

Fear can often instigate a rippling feeling of helplessness, but what if this same emotion could be converted into empowerment? Brandon Webb, former Navy SEAL, joined Ben Kieffer on River to River to talk about his experience with grappling with his own fears in his latest book, "Mastering Fear: A Navy SEAL's Guide"

wikimedia.org

Long before more than two million women and allies gathered in Washington D.C. for the 2017 Women’s March, and before almost daily protests against the current presidential administration spalshed across national headlines, Americans were organizing and mobilizing acts of resistance, dating back to the very founding of the nation.

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

In this politics day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Dennis Goldford, professor and chair of political science and Rachel Caufield professor of political science at Drake University.

Creative Commons/Pixabay

 

Technology Is playing an increasingly active role in our political climate. Social media and other technological communications systems make it easier for people to engage with candidates, increase opportunities for offline political mobilization, and provide access to an unprecedented amount of news and information.

U.S. Embassy New Dehli

Franklin Roosevelt’s first vice president John Nance Garner famously said the title is “not worth a bucket of warm spit.” It's a role that has always been up for interpretation throughout White House administrations, with the VP ready to step in or step back.

On this hour of River to River, Presidential Historian Tim Walch and Donna Hoffman, head of the Political Science Department at the University of Northern Iowa, sit down with host Ben Kieffer to talk about the many iterations of this second-in-command position.

Kurt Bauschardt

Recent calls for civility in political and public discourse in the wake of White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders being kicked out of a Washington D.C. restaurant have people questioning what civil conversations look like and whether we are indeed living in a post-civil society.

In this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks about the breakdown of civility with former Congressmen from Iowa, Jim Lightfoot and Dave Nagle, as well as former Iowa Senate President Mary Kramer, and Iowa Public Radio correspondent Dean Borg.

Corey Torpie

Democratic Socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez upset a 10-term establishment Democrat in New York last week. While her district doesn’t necessarily mirror that of Iowa’s districts, a 2016 Des Moines Register/Bloomberg News Iowa Poll found that 43 percent of likely Democratic caucus-goers consider themselves socialists.

On this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer explores what Democratic Socialism means today and why it has an appeal at this particular time in U.S. history.

Lorie Shaull

Justice Anthony Kennedy’s announcement that he will retire from the U.S. Supreme Court this summer has put into question the future of abortion rights in the United States.

Ben Kieffer co-hosts this "Pints and Politics" edition of River to River with Gazette investigative reporter Erin Jordan. They ask panelists to discuss the latest in national and state politics, including how the election match ups look in Iowa’s Congressional races.

Panelists joining the discussion include Gazette columnists Todd Dorman, Lynda Waddington, Adam Sullivan, Gazette reporter James Lynch, and special guest, Dianne Bystrom, who has served as director of the Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics at Iowa State University since 1996.

LWYang, Creative Commons / Flickr

When a well known writer, actor, filmmaker or musician gets accused of inappriopriate or even criminal behavior, especially in cases of sexual misconduct, what happens to their body of work? Has the art created lost its value? Should we stop teaching texts or bodies of work because of an uncovered wrong? 

These are some of the questions being asked in the wake of #MeToo. Alfred Martin, professor of communication studies at University of Iowa says we’re asking these questions because we want to feel like something is being done in response.

Wikimedia Commons

 

Jacob Riis

What does it mean to be “an American?” How has that identity changed over the decades?

 

This hour, host Ben Kieffer talks with presidential historian Tim Walch and Rene Rocha, director of the Latino Studies department at the University of Iowa, about the history of immigration policy in the U.S.

 

“[Throughout history,] there are periods of tension against every group that have arrived that are different from the model or the norm, which is White Anglo-Saxon males from Great Britain,” says Walch.

 

AP

On this politics day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with political analysts Jim McCormick, professor of political science at Iowa State University, and Wayne Moyer, Rosenfield professor of political science at Grinnell College. They discuss the G7 Summit blowup, the showdown over immigration in Congress, and President Trump's meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un. 

Marco Verch/Flickr

On this politics day edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer talks with political analysts, Donna Hoffman of the University of Northern Iowa and Dave Andersen of Iowa State University, about President Trump's FBI spy claims, the campaigning ahead of Iowa's gubernatorial primaries, and updates on trade disputes with China.

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DayTrippin US

Dianne Bystrom is the Director of the Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics at Iowa State University. When she came to Iowa in 1996, she had been studying a big year in politics for women: the 1992 election, which brought a huge increase in women holding political office. 

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Carl Wycoff

The U.S. House's attempt to pass a farm bill failed this morning.  A number of Republicans were trying to leverage votes for a conservative immigration bill first.

Congressman David Young from Iowa's third district voted for the bill, and he says that he is confident that there will ultimately be a farm bill.  But he says it's tough for farmers especially in light of other trade policies.

planned parenthood clinic
Sarah Boden/IPR File

Groups that provide or refer patients for abortions would reportedly be barred from receiving federal funding under a soon to be released Trump administration proposal.

democratic debate
Katarina Sostaric / IPR

The six Democratic candidates for Iowa governor had some heated exchanges Wednesday at a debate at the Iowa Public TV studios in Johnston. It was the first time voters saw the six candidates directly address each other and attack their opponents’ records.

All of the candidates said they want to decrease state tax credits given to businesses because they see them as hurting Iowa’s revenue growth and leading to budget cuts for education and state agencies.

Politics Day: Foreign Policy

May 16, 2018
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UN Photo/Joao Araujo Pinto

On the same day the U.S. Embassy in Israel moves to Jerusalem, over fifty Palestinians were killed by the Israeli military. On this politics day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer gets analysis of the conflict in Gaza.  Other foreign policy is covered including the latest on the Iran nuclear deal, a meeting with north Korea might be in jeapordy, and what CIA Director nominee Gina Haspel's views on torture mean for the United States. 

Also, the guests discuss what Tuesday’s midterm primaries may mean for control of Congress and Trump’s rising poll numbers. 

This special edition of River to River is in partnership with Iowa's The Gazette. "Pints and Politics" was a lively discussion of local and national politics that was recorded at Big Grove Brewery in Iowa City on Thursday, May 10.  

Clay Masters / Iowa Public Radio

U.S. House Democratic Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi was in Des Moines Sunday to rally support among party activists for the midterm election. The minority leader was the featured speaker at the Polk County Democrats spring dinner fundraiser.

Pelosi says the party needs to focus on convincing the country Democrats have a “better deal” for Americans.

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