Classical

Justin Salem Meyer Photography

The Des Moines-based Heartland Youth Choir is hosting their 11th annual Meet the Composer Festival in Des Moines! Young central Iowa singers in grades 4 through 8 collaborate with an internationally known composer to perform the composer’s works for a public concert. This year’s guest composer is Iowa native and Drake University graduate Elaine Hagenberg. The concert will mark the world-premiere of Hagenberg’s new work, “See How the Rose Unfolds,” a setting of a poem by fellow Iowan and poet Elaine Jungers.

“There are 1,000 ways to paint, why limit yourself to one manner?” – Charles Thwaites, 1947

The Wisconsin painter Charles Thwaites was the rare artist who excelled at both realist and abstract styles. His transition from one to the other was smooth and almost effortless, and he succeeded at both with confidence and originality. The Dubuque Museum of Art is showcasing 43 Thwaites paintings, drawings, and prints drawn from the collection of MOWA in West Bend, Wisconsin.

This Symphonies of Iowa features wcfsymphony’s “Serenades“ concert. The performance includes works by Mozart, Krommer, Beethoven, and Schubert.

Party like it’s 1799 with jovial music for entertaining written by Mozart and his Viennese contemporaries. Played for you by the virtuosic wcfsymphony winds in an intimate ballroom just like the ones where Mozart partied, the beautiful Brown Derby. Don’t miss this broadcast of IPR’s Symphonies of Iowa on Sunday, March 18th at 4 p.m. and again on Monday, March 19th at 7 p.m.!

PROGRAM

This week’s Symphonies of Iowa features the Des Moines Symphony’s “Ritual Fire Dance “concert. The performance includes works by Ravel, Rodrigo, and Falla.

If you listen to my daily program, you might notice that I can't resist English pastoral music. You might not guess that I once thought of it as an indulgence, a guilty pleasure like gooey brownies (or, more to the point, sticky toffee pudding). I learned early on to equate "greatness" in music with Germanic thoroughness, and "significance" with cutting-edge spikiness. Musicology back then wrote off the English pastoral style as "a reactionary mishmash of escapism, sentimentality and nostalgia—a refuge for dead-enders and also-rans."

This week’s Symphonies of Iowa features wcfsymphony’s “Gary Kelley’s Nachtmusik” concert. The Halloween-themed performance includes works by Gustav Mahler, Ferruccio Busoni, Hector Berlioz, Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonín Dvořák, and Charles Gounod.

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This week’s Symphonies of Iowa features Orchestra Iowa’s “Tchaikovsky’s Pathétique” concert. The orchestra performs works by Sibelius, Shostakovich and Tchaikovsky.

Jacqueline Halbloom

Tune in Wednesday, February 28th at noon and 10 p.m. for a special Performance Iowa featuring UNI and Cedar Valley musicians performing in our studio to honor Black History Month! Black History Month is an annual observance in remembrance of important people and events in the history of people of color. It was first proposed by the leaders of the Black United Students at Kent State University in February 1969, and first celebrated at Kent State one year later, in February 1970.

John Pemble

Many symphony orchestras are branching out in an effort to attract new music fans. Even if someone has never been to a orchestra concert before, they might want to go to Harry Potter Night at the Des Moines Symphony or enjoy an evening of “A Night of Symphonic Rock” as interpreted by Orchestra Iowa.

“I think it’s wonderful,” says Des Moines Symphony music director Joseph Giunta. “I think it’s a great way to expand audiences, and I think it’s a great way to stay in touch with your community.”

This week’s Symphonies of Iowa features the Des Moines Symphony’s “Masterworks 2: Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake” concert. The orchestra performs works by Wagner, Richard Strauss, and Tchaikovsky.

In September of last year, we released a historical story for the Symphonies of Iowa broadcast of Orchestra Iowa’s “American Mystics” concert. The version that we published was adapted from the Nathan Broder biography of Samuel Barber; the same source used by many major symphonies for their program notes for Barber’s Violin Concerto. However, it has come to light that the Broder version of events may not be accurate. Last year, we published the following:

We regret to inform listeners that due to circumstances beyond our control, this broadcast has been postponed until further notice. We will update the schedule with a new broadcast date when it has been determined. Be sure to tune in next week for the Des Moines Symphony's "Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake" concert!

Last September, concert violinist Jennifer Frautschi performed in Des Moines with the Des Moines Symphony Orchestra. As the Chicago Tribune noted, "violinist Jennifer Frautschi is molding a career with smart interpretations of both warhorses and rarities." Equally at home in the classic and contemporary repertoire, her recent seasons have featured innumerable performances and recordings of works ranging from Brahms and Schumann to Berg and Schoenberg.

www.triinruubel.com

Stephens Auditorium and the Ames International Orchestra Foundation (AIOFA) proudly welcome back the Estonian National Symphony Orchestra on Thursday, February 1st at 7:30 p.m. Founded as a small radio orchestra in 1926, ENSO has since grown to 100 musicians performing more than 60 concerts each year with a repertoire ranging from baroque music to premieres of contemporary works. They enjoy increasing acclaim for their Grammy award-winning recordings and festival appearances in Scandinavia, Europe and the former Soviet Union.

Nick Kaizer

The Russian-based collective Moscow Festival Ballet presents Giselle at Stephens Auditorium at Iowa State University on Thursday, January 25th at 7:30 p.m.! In the ballet, a peasant girl named Giselle dies of a broken heart after discovering her lover is betrothed to another. A group of supernatural women, who dance men to death, summon Giselle from her grave. They target her lover for death, but Giselle’s great love frees him from their grasp.

Lisa-Marie Mazzucco

We regret to inform listeners that due to circumstances beyond our control, this broadcast has been postponed until further notice. We will update the schedule with a new broadcast date when it has been  determined. Be sure to tune in next week for the wcfsymphony's "Project TRIO" concert!

Symphonies of Iowa is back for the New Year! You won’t want to miss our 2018 season debut, featuring the Des Moines Symphony’s “Invitation to the Dance” concert.

Rob Merritt

This Sunday, January 21st, IPR will be broadcasting the Cedar Rapids Opera Theatre’s production of Puccini’s “Turandot” at 2:00 p.m. The cast features Andrew McLaughlin, Nicholas Nestorak, Max Zander, Stephen Swanson, Alicia Jayourba, Jesse Donner, Tad Ennen, Rebecca Nash, Dustin Peterson, Christina Adams, Chloe Moore, and Ta’u Pupu’a. You can see the opera live at the Paramount Theatre in Cedar Rapids on Friday, January 19th at 7:30 p.m. or Sunday, January 21st at 2:00 p.m., or listen live with us on IPR Classical. Don’t miss it!

The University of Northern Iowa Opera’s production of Engelbert Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel will be on stage at the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center on Friday, January 26th at 7:30 p.m. and again on Sunday, January 28th at 2 p.m. Graduate voice students Megan Grey and Emily Secor star as Hansel and Gretel in this fully-staged production.

Due to inclement weather Thursday, this event regretfully had to be cancelled.

The Cedar Rapids Opera Theatre performances of Puccini’s Turandot will be held on Friday, January 19th at 7:30 and again on Sunday, January 21st at 2 p.m. at the Paramount Theatre in Cedar Rapids. Internationally acclaimed Australian Soprano Rebecca Nash stars in the title role and former NFL football player and CROT returning tenor, Ta’u Pupu’a captures the heart and soul of Prince Calaf.

 

CARL BROMBERG / VISIONS PHOTOGRAPHY

IPR's Performance Iowa is excited to bring you a special New Year’s Day broadcast from the front lawn of Brucemore Mansion in Cedar Rapids! Orchestra Iowa is celebrating 10 years of Brucemore concerts with “Brucemorechestra X.”

Chicago Field Museum

The Cedar Rapids Museum of Art is housing a two-gallery exhibition of the works of the illustrious sculptor Malvina Hoffman. From her early bust of her father Richard to her famous commission from Chicago’s Field Museum to create their “Hall of Man,” Malvina Hoffman: A Sculptor’s Journey traces Hoffman’s artistic roots from her teenage creations through apprenticeship with Auguste Rodin and into her arrival as an independent and gifted artist.

Irma René Koen was a true Renaissance woman of the arts, who was certainly ahead of her time. She was born in Rock Island, IL, and studied at the Art Institute of Chicago with prominent landscape painter Charles Francis Browne and with leading Danish-American portraitist John Christen Johansen. Irma’s talents and interests extended beyond painting over the course of her lifetime. In her youth, she danced in theatrical benefits and was an accomplished cellist. After moving to Mexico permanently in 1944, Irma continued painting and traveling.

Though coffee consumption was illegal in much of Germany during his lifetime, the great composer Johann Sebastian Bach was a known frequenter of Leipzig’s many coffee houses. His famously exuberant personality could have easily been attributed to his avid coffee drinking. So enthusiastic was he about the beverage that he composed a secular cantata about it entitled “Schweigt stille, plaudert nicht (Be still, stop chattering)” better known as the Coffee Cantata.

Ring in the holiday season with Orchestra Iowa’s 2016 “Holiday Spectacular” concert! The festive program includes holiday favorites and works by Rutter, John Williams, Leroy Anderson, and more!

Grant Wood’s painting American Gothic is second only to the Mona Lisa in terms of significance. The Iowan artist was extremely appreciative of Midwest traditions and culture, which he celebrated in 1930 through American Gothic and many other works. The painting is often understood as a satirical comment on the Midwestern character, and is now firmly fixated in the nation’s pop culture. Yet Wood intended it to be a positive statement about rural American values and an image of reassurance at a time of great dislocation and disillusionment.

Rachel Bearinger

Matthew Coley’s marimba music is taking over IPR’s Studio One on Wednesday, December 6th at noon! IPR’s Performance Iowa is excited to bring you the Heartland Marimba Festival’s Matthew Coley performing holiday favorites as well as impressive arrangements of Preludes and Fugues from Book Two of Bach’s The Well-Tempered Clavier. Tune in on Wednesday, December 6th at noon for this magical live Studio One Performance Iowa broadcast!

One of the world’s most celebrated violinists hails from our own state of Iowa.

Robert Zimansky received his first instruction from John Ferrell at the University of Iowa. He continued his studies with Sally Thomas and Ivan Galamian at the Juilliard School in New York. In 1972, Zimansky packed up his violin and moved to Europe, where he became first concertmaster in Spoleto, Munich, Stuttgart, the Lucerne Festival and the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande in Geneva.

IPR/Jacqueline Halbloom

Concert pianist and respected educator, Georgian native Dr. Vakhtang Kodanashvili joined UNI instructor of piano ranks this fall. Vakhtang and his UNI colleague and concert pianist Sean Botkin will fill us in on UNI’s December 2nd Keyboard Festival. Vakhtang will make his IPR Studio One debut performing works by Rachmaninoff on IPR’s Performance Iowa on Tuesday, November 28th at noon. Sean and Vakhtang will come together at the piano to perform Rachmaninoff's Six Pieces, Op. 11. Dr.

Many years ago, the Persian King Shahryar was betrayed by his wife. In anger, he vowed to marry a new woman each day and have the previous one beheaded, so that she would have no chance of being unfaithful to him. A man of his word, he executed 1,000 women before being visited by the young Scheherazade.

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