Emily Woodbury

Talk Show Producer

Emily Woodbury has worked for Iowa Public Radio since 2011. She became a talk show producer in 2012. Her duties include researching show topics, booking guests, preparing news copy, editing audio, and directing live programming for IPR’s national-award winning shows River to River and Talk of Iowa.

She is also a member of Student Broadcasters Incorporated, which serves as an advisory board to the students who work at 89.7 FM KRUI in Iowa City. Prior to joining Iowa Public Radio, Emily worked as a news director for KRUI and as an intern for Chicago Public Media. She has won awards for her reporting and a couple of her news reports have been featured statewide on Iowa Public Radio's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Emily has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Iowa School of Journalism and Mass Communication and a minor in political science.

John Pemble

It’s been a month since the 2018 legislative session began. On this edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer talks with three statehouse reporters to discuss the many issues being debated at the capitol, including: changes to Iowa gun law, plans to get tough on so-called sanctuary cities, speed cameras getting the red light, and proposed budget cuts to Iowa’s judicial branch, state universities, and human services.

NASA/Van Allen Probes/Goddard Space Flight Center

60 years ago this week, the first U.S. satellite, Explorer One, launched into space. An instrument on the satellite, designed and built by University of Iowa physicist James Van Allen, discovered radiation belts around the Earth, a stunning discovery that made headlines worldwide.

On this River to River segment, Ben Kieffer talks with University of Iowa astrophysicist Allison Jaynes about how Van Allen’s discovery helps scientists today discover the dangerous areas for satellites and astronauts traveling in the near-Earth environment.

Emily Woodbury

Kevin "B.F." Burt of Coralville has been performing the blues for more than 20 years. He's beloved in Iowa, and has performed around the world.

This month, he won three first place awards at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis, Tennessee.

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks with Burt about his humble solo performance origins at Baldy's Wraps in Iowa City, what it's like to be discovered after his performance in Memphis, and where he's focusing his energy next. 

Nick Brincks

Majd Abdulghani spent two years recording her life, and eventually her story was edited into “Majd’s Diary: Two Years in the Life of a Saudi Girl,” which recently received the Best Documentary Silver award at the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

“I want to prove that being a Muslim, Saudi woman who wears a head scarf doesn’t stop me from being a scientist,” Abdulghani says in the piece.

Iowa Public Radio

This hour of River to River is a "Pints and Politics" edition and includes panelists Gazette reporter James Lynch, and Gazette columnists Todd Dorman, Lynda Waddington, and Adam Sullivan. The discussion covers legislation about water quality and the state budget shortfall.  

The panel is joined by University of Northern Iowa political scientist Chris Larimer to talk through state politics and how social media and political polling shapes our politics.

Hosts and moderators are Iowa Public Radio's Emily Woodbury and The Gazette's Erin Jordan.

Joseph Gruber

Millennials will oust Baby Boomers as the largest voting bloc as early as 2020. Dave Andersen, assistant professor of political science at Iowa State University, joins host Ben Kieffer in this River to River segment to discuss how Millennial voters may change politics in the decades to come.

“They are going to shift the focus of how we talk about government,” Andersen says. “Millennials seem to want lower taxes, more government. They are really in favor of smart government that is more efficient. We haven’t really talked about that yet as a country.”

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez

Last January, actor Woody Harrelson wrote, directed, and starred in a live feature film called Lost in London. The movie was shot in London and broadcast live into American theaters, with audiences watching the film in real time.

The movie is inspired by real life events, and while it is a comedy, it takes places entirely in what Harrelson describes as the worst night of his life: a 2002 incident when he was arrested for getting into a fight with a cab driver just days after a night of infidelity was exposed by a tabloid.

Dean Borg

This week, animal rescue organizations rushed to offer assistance to what appears to be a massive animal hoarding situation in eastern Iowa. Lonnie Viner of the Cedar Valley Humane Society says 898 live small animals came out of the Vinton home where the seizure was made.

Chapendra/Flickr

The World Health Organization and the American Psychiatric Association will classify video game addiction as a mental disorder in the 11th International Classification of Diseases.

Iowa State University Psychologist Doug Gentile says that to tell the difference between a healthy passion for gaming and a damaging addiction, it's best to consider when it becomes dysfunctional.

NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

On this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with presidential historian Tim Walch and political scientist Rachel Caufield to mark one year of Trump in office.  They examine how he has defied convention when compared with other modern presidents.

They examine themes including: accomplishments and public approval at the one year mark, how presidents deal with criticism, their relationship to their cabinets, and how they have justified and spoken of the U.S. nuclear arsenal.

Emily Woodbury

Lauren Haldeman is a poet and illustrator who lives in Iowa City. She’s a Writer’s Workshop graduate and the winner of the Colorado Prize for Poetry.

On this Talk of Iowa segment, she talks about how her latest poetry collection, Instead of Dying, was inspired in part by the death of her younger brother, Ryan.

Honza Soukup

Pediatricians agree that breast milk is the healthiest source of nutrition for a newborn baby, and breast feeding rates are on the rise in the United States. But, nursing a baby isn’t always an option.

“Our daughter was full-term,” says Sarah Fillmore of Des Moines, “but she had to be in the NICU for about a week, and she had some breathing problems when she was born that made it difficult for her to learn how to latch.”

John Pemble

Governor Kim Reynolds delivered her first Condition of the State address today. She succeeded Governor Terry Branstad and has not been elected to the office she holds, so this is an important moment for her.

“What a country and state we live in, where a small town girl from rural Iowa can become governor and have the opportunity to serve Iowans at the highest level," Reynolds says in her speech.

Iowa Flu Update

Jan 5, 2018
Melanie Hayes/Flickr

Four more Iowans died of the flu this week. Iowa Department of Public Health medical director Patricia Quinlisk says this is a particularly bad strain of influenza, especially for the elderly.

"The particular strain we’re seeing right now can hit anybody of any age, but it hits older people particularly hard. We also know that older people are just more at risk of getting the flu and getting serious illness of the flu because their immune systems just don’t work as well.”

Alan Light/Flickr

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s report on homelessness shows that for the first time in seven years, the number of Americans experiencing homelessness increased by about seven-tenths of a percent.

Iowa ranks among the states with the lowest rates of homelessness. Homelessness decreased by 10 percent last year in the state compared to 2016. That means 1,500 people and 1,256 families were homeless in Iowa.

On this edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer explores what it’s like to be homeless in Iowa, particularly during this cold snap.

Iowa capitol
John Pemble / Iowa Public Radio

Lawmakers gavel in for the 2018 legislative session Monday, January 8 in Des Moines at the statehouse. After several controversial bills made it through in 2017, Republicans remain in control of both chambers and the governor's office. What are their plans for the 2018 session?

Iowans should keep an eye on the statehouse with regard to tax reform, according to Radio Iowa's News Director Kay Henderson. 

Tim Evanson/Flickr

On this edition of River to River, we listen back to conversations from 2017 about milestones.

2017 marked the 60th anniversary of the launch of the world’s first artificial satellite: Sputnik 1. In October, Ben Kieffer spoke with longtime space scientist Don Gurnett to talk about how that momentous event instilled fear in America and marked the start of the space race with the Soviet Union. 

Gurnett is a physics and astronomy professor at the University of Iowa.

Michael Taggart

In 2017, Iowa lost a number of remarkable Iowans. On this edition of River to River, we hear about severable notable Iowans who passed this year by speaking to people who knew them well.

U.S. Pacific Fleet

Both the U.S. and China have accused the other of militarizing the South China Sea—China has been creating islands to back its territorial claims, and the U.S. has sent military ships and planes near the disputed islands.

On this edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer talks with political scientist Sara Mitchell of the University of Iowa about various maritime disputes. She has reviewed patterns of maritime conflicts going back to the early 1900s.

Courtesy of Iowa State University Large Animal Hospital

If you’ve ever taken a psychology class, you’ve probably heard the story of Phineas Gage. He was a railroad worker who survived a terrible accident in which an iron rod was driven through his head. He’s remembered in the psychology books because that accident taught us a lot about how the brain works.

In this Talk of Iowa segment, Charity Nebbe hosts a conversation about an Iowa horse named Jamberry who had a very similar accident to Gage.

Emily Woodbury

Last month, head of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai, unveiled plans to repeal the landmark 2015 rules known as "net neutrality," which are Obama-era regulations that prohibit internet service providers from impeding consumer access to web content.

Pai argues the rules are too heavy-handed and have stifled innovation and investment in the broadband industry.

Tony Townsend, associate professor of Information Systems at Iowa State University, says it is likely that Pai’s plan will be voted through.

Artizone/Flickr

Iowa and 12 other states have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a California law that requires eggs sold in the Golden State to come from hens that have room to extend their limbs.

Missouri’s Attorney General filed a lawsuit this week on behalf of the 13 states, including Iowa, which is the largest egg-producing state in the country. It’s the latest challenge to the California regulations.

On this new buzz edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer talks about the lawsuit with Neil Hamilton, director of the Agricultural Law Center at Drake University.

Amos Ben Gershom GPO

Today, President Trump announces his formal recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

On this edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer asks political analysts about the president reversing nearly seven decades of resisting such policy.  Joining the conversation: Dennis Goldford of Drake University and Dave Andersen of Iowa State University.

They also talk about the tax overhaul, the possibility of a government shutdown, and the accusations of sexual harassment and assault involving several national politicians.

Russia’s relationship with China has strengthened in recent years following Moscow’s escalating tensions with the West after Russia’s annexation of Crimea.

On this edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer talks with geopolitical scholar Sharyl Cross about the changing world order. 

"Both Moscow and Beijing share the position that they oppose what they perceive as U.S. hegemony in the international system. They believe that the United States needs to have a counterweight in terms of influencing the international community," says Cross.

Emily Woodbury

Artist Rose Frantzen grew up in Maquoketa and started painting portraits when she was in high school. Since then, she’s gained national and international acclaim for her oil paintings. She lives and works with her husband, Chuck Morris, an acclaimed artist of his own right.

Iowa seems like an unlikely destination for two very successful artists who met in New York City’s Central Park, but Rose Frantzen and Chuck Morris have made Maquoketa their home, their workplace, and an artistic destination.

Didriks / Flickr

For many, listening to StoryCorps on Friday mornings has become routine—a few minutes to listen, learn, reflect, and often shed a few tears.

When StoryCorps debuted in 2003, it sounded unlike anything else on public radio.  They were stories not driven by news or cultural events, and they were stories that didn’t feature news-makers. These were stories of normal people sharing their memories. We quickly learned that those normal people were extraordinary, and that we all have stories to share.

Emily Woodbury

If you're looking to update your reading list or need gift suggestions for friends & family, this annual holiday book show has got you covered.

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Jan Weismiller and Tim Budd of Prairie Lights Books in Iowa City and Hunter Gillum of Beaverdale Books in Des Moines. They share their top picks for fiction and non-fiction books released this year.

TIM BUDD’S BEST OF FICTION:

Artemis by Andy Weir

Neil Turner

On this news buzz edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer hosts conversations on various Iowa news of the week:

Gage Skidmore

President Trump returns from Asia to political turmoil. 

On this edition of River to River, political analysts Steffen Schmidt of Iowa State University and Scott Peters of the University of Iowa discuss: Republican efforts to stay focused on a tax overhaul; the House and Senate visions for tax reform and the latest effort as part of it to repeal the health insurance mandate; Jeff Sessions' testimony on Russia meetings; and the Justice Department weighing a Clinton investigation. 

bird flew / Flickr

Thomas Olander of Louisiana has been a shrimper and fisherman for about 40 years. He says his livelihood and way of life is dying out because of the growing dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

“The guys that drag across that area, they absolutely cannot catch anything alive,” he says. “Nothing lives in it.”

 

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